Occlusive hyperemia: a new way to think about an old problem

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Contributor Notes

Address reprint requests to: Charles B. Wilson, M.D., University of California, Department of Neurological Surgery, c/o The Editorial Office, 1360 Ninth Avenue, Suite 210, San Francisco, California 94122.
  • 1.

    Al-Rodhan NAF, , Sundt TM Jr, & Piepgras DG, et al: Occlusive hyperemia: a theory for the hemodynamic complications following resection of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations. J Neurosurg 78:167175, 1993 Al-Rodhan NAF, Sundt TM Jr, Piepgras DG, et al: Occlusive hyperemia: a theory for the hemodynamic complications following resection of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations. J Neurosurg 78:167–175, 1993

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  • 2.

    Morgan MK, , Johnston IH, & Hallinan JM, et al: Complications of surgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations of the brain. J Neurosurg 78:176182, 1993 Morgan MK, Johnston IH, Hallinan JM, et al: Complications of surgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations of the brain. J Neurosurg 78:176–182, 1993

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  • 3.

    Spetzler RF, , Wilson CB, & Weinstein P, et al: Normal perfusion pressure breakthrough theory. Clin Neurosurg 25:651672, 1978 Spetzler RF, Wilson CB, Weinstein P, et al: Normal perfusion pressure breakthrough theory. Clin Neurosurg 25:651–672, 1978

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