Volumetric quantification of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage independently predicts hydrocephalus and seizures

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  • 1 Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and
  • | 2 School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
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OBJECTIVE

Hydrocephalus and seizures greatly impact outcomes of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH); however, reliable tools to predict these outcomes are lacking. The authors used a volumetric quantitative analysis tool to evaluate the association of total aSAH volume with the outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus and seizures.

METHODS

Total hemorrhage volume following aneurysm rupture was retrospectively analyzed on presentation CT imaging using a custom semiautomated computer program developed in MATLAB that employs intensity-based k-means clustering to automatically separate blood voxels from other tissues. Volume data were added to a prospectively maintained aSAH database. The association of hemorrhage volume with shunted hydrocephalus and seizures was evaluated through logistic regression analysis and the diagnostic accuracy through analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).

RESULTS

The study population comprised 288 consecutive patients with aSAH. The mean total hemorrhage volume was 74.9 ml. Thirty-eight patients (13.2%) developed seizures. The mean hemorrhage volume in patients who developed seizures was significantly higher than that in patients with no seizures (mean difference 17.3 ml, p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, larger hemorrhage volume on initial CT scan and hemorrhage volume > 50 ml (OR 2.81, p = 0.047, 95% CI 1.03–7.80) were predictive of seizures. Forty-eight patients (17%) developed shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. The mean hemorrhage volume in patients who developed shunt-dependent hydrocephalus was significantly higher than that in patients who did not (mean difference 17.2 ml, p = 0.006). Larger hemorrhage volume and hemorrhage volume > 50 ml (OR 2.45, p = 0.03, 95% CI 1.08–5.54) were predictive of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. Hemorrhage volume had adequate discrimination for the development of seizures (AUC 0.635) and shunted hydrocephalus (AUC 0.629).

CONCLUSIONS

Hemorrhage volume is an independent predictor of seizures and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients with aSAH. Further evaluation of aSAH quantitative volumetric analysis may complement existing scales used in clinical practice and assist in patient prognostication and management.

ABBREVIATIONS

AED = antiepileptic drug; aSAH = aneurysmal SAH; AUC = area under the receiver operating characteristic curve; DCI = delayed cerebral infarction; EVD = external ventricular drain; IVH = intraventricular hemorrhage; ROI = region of interest; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage; WFNS = World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

Illustration from Kim et al. (pp 1164–1172). Copyright Eui Hyun Kim. Published with permission.

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