Tumor location and IDH1 mutation may predict intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy

Clinical article

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Object

Intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy may interfere with patients' ability to cooperate throughout the procedure, and it may affect their outcome. The authors have assessed the occurrence of intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy in regard to tumor location and the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) status of the tumor.

Methods

Data were collected in 137 consecutive patients who underwent awake craniotomy for removal of a brain tumor. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the incidence of seizures based on the tumor location and its IDH1 mutation status, and then compared the groups for clinical variables and surgical outcome parameters.

Results

Tumor location was strongly associated with the occurrence of intraoperative seizures. Eleven patients (73%) with tumor located in the supplementary motor area (SMA) experienced intraoperative seizures, compared with 17 (13.9%) with tumors in the other three non-SMA brain regions (p < 0.0001). Interestingly, there was no significant association between history of seizures and tumor location (p = 0.44). Most of the patients (63.6%) with tumor in the SMA region harbored an IDH1 mutation compared with those who had tumors in non-SMA regions. Thirty-one of 52 patients (60%) with a preoperative history of seizures had an IDH1 mutation (p = 0.02), and 15 of 22 patients (68.2%) who experienced intraoperative seizures had an IDH1 mutation (p = 0.03). In a multivariate analysis, tumor location was found as a significant predictor of intraoperative seizures (p = 0.002), and a trend toward IDH1 mutation as such a predictor was found as well (p = 0.06). Intraoperative seizures were not associated with worse outcome.

Conclusions

Patients with tumors located in the SMA are more prone to develop intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy compared with patients who have a tumor in non-SMA frontal areas and other brain regions. The IDH1 mutation was more common in SMA region tumors compared with other brain regions, and may be an additional risk factor for the occurrence of intraoperative seizures.

Abbreviations used in this paper:AED = antiepileptic drug; HGG = high-grade glioma; KPS = Karnofsky Performance Scale; LGG = low-grade glioma; LOS = length of hospital stay; SMA = supplementary motor area; 2-HG = 2-hydroxyglutarate.
Article Information

Contributor Notes

Ms. Gonen and Dr. Grossman contributed equally to this work.

Address correspondence to: Zvi Ram, M.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizmann St., Tel Aviv 64239, Israel. email: zviram@tasmc.health.gov.il.Please include this information when citing this paper: published online August 29, 2014; DOI: 10.3171/2014.7.JNS132657.
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