The transorbital keyhole approach: early and long-term outcome analysis of approach-related morbidity and cosmetic results

Technical note

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  • 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Universitätsklinik Düsseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf; and
  • 2 Department of Neurosurgery, University of Münster, Germany
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Object

In 2003 the authors introduced a minimally invasive transorbital keyhole approach. Because this approach requires removal of the orbital rim and orbital roof, there have been concerns regarding perioperative morbidity, long-term morbidity, and cosmetic results. The authors evaluated approach-related morbidity and cosmetic results in their patients to determine the rate of complications and compared this to published reports of similar approaches.

Material

Seventy-one patients (41 female, 30 male) underwent operations using this approach between 2004 and 2008. Immediate approach-related morbidity was recorded after the operation. Late morbidity was determined after 7 months by an independent examiner while cosmetic results were self-rated by the patient using a questionnaire.

Results

Fifty-one (72%) of 71 patients had no postoperative complications and 12 (16.9%) had minor complications, the most common of which was subgaleal CSF collection (7.0%). Other minor complications included facial nerve palsy (2.8%), hyposphagma (2.8%), periorbital swelling due to periorbital hematoma (2.8%), and subdural hematoma (1.4%). Major complications requiring surgical revision occurred in 4 patients (5.6%); these were CSF fistulas in 2 patients, pneumocephalus in 1 patient, and a hematoma in 1 patient. Forty-nine (90.7%) of all 54 examined patients rated the cosmetic results as very good or good. Major long-term morbidity was hyposmia or anosmia (14 patients) followed by hypoesthesia around the scar (9 patients).

Conclusions

The transorbital keyhole approach is a feasible approach with a low-risk profile for postoperative or long-term morbidity and excellent cosmetic outcome.

Abbreviations used in this paper: ACoA = anterior communicating artery; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to: Kerim Beseoglu, M.D., Department of Neurosurgery, Universitätsklinik Düsseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany. email: beseoglu@med.uni-duesseldorf.de.

Please include this information when citing this paper: published online October 29, 2010; DOI: 10.3171/2010.9.JNS1095.

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