Production of Focal Destructive Lesions in the Central Nervous System With Ultrasound

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With the contemporary development of surgical methods of treating the symptoms of painful, psychiatric, and basal ganglion disorders, the neurosurgeon is frequently called upon to produce a focal destructive lesion in the nervous system. The universal and obvious objective is to create a localized lesion in the desired area with no damage to adjacent or intervening tissues. Recorded experiences of neurosurgeons attest to the fact that this ideal has not yet been attained. Paraparesis and bladder dysfunction following anterolateral chordotomy, vegetation following prefrontal lobotomy, and hemiplegia following surgical treatment of basal ganglion disorders are examples of damage to

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Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

© AANS, except where prohibited by US copyright law.

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    Schematic diagram of multibeam irradiator.

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    Closeup view of multibeam irradiator, saline container and exposed brain of a monkey.

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    General view of stereotaxic apparatus with animal and irradiator in position.

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    Transverse section of brain of cat #101 in a plane of irradiation. Left internal capsule was irradiated at 210 watts/cm.2 for 4.0 seconds. Three days postoperative. Weil stain.

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    Transverse section through pyramid of cat #76. Lesion illustrated in Fig. 6. Marchi stain.

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    Transverse section of brain of cat #76 in a plane of irradiation. Left internal capsule was irradiated at 210 watts/cm.2 for 4.0 seconds. Thirty days postoperative. Thionin stain.

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    Transverse section of brain of cat #80 in a plane of irradiation. Left internal capsule was irradiated at 180 watts/cm.2 for 7.0 seconds. Thirty-two days postoperative. Thionin stain.

References

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