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Cover Neurosurgical Focus: Video

Flow diversion of a dissecting PICA aneurysm

Tyler Lazaro, Viren Vasandani, Ariadna Robledo, Nisha Gadgil, and Peter Kan

A 47-year-old female with a history of a ruptured left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysm, status post coil embolization and retreatment for recurrence, presented with evidence of a recurrent dissecting PICA aneurysm. Given that these aneurysms are considered high risk and have a greater propensity for rupture than anterior circulation aneurysms, retreatment was recommended. With the patient’s strong preference for endovascular therapy, flow diversion with a Silk Vista Baby was performed. Given the low-profile design of the device, a radial artery approach and coaxial technique were used to deploy the flow diverter. The device was successfully placed, with complete obliteration of the aneurysm after 1 year.

The video can be found here: https://stream.cadmore.media/r10.3171/2022.7.FOCVID2247

Open access

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Cover Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons

Removal of a flanged ventricular catheter: illustrative case

M. Benjamin Larkin, Tyler T. Lazaro, Howard L. Weiner, and William E. Whitehead

BACKGROUND

Flanged ventricular catheters were created in the 1970s to decrease shunt failure by preventing the holes at the catheter tip from contacting the choroid plexus. However, the flanges on the catheter frequently scarred within and tether to the choroid plexus, resulting in higher rates of intraventricular hemorrhage when removed. Today, flanged catheters are rarely encountered.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors describe an illustrative case of a 7-year-old girl recently adopted from another country with a history of myelomeningocele and shunted hydrocephalus. She had been treated with a flanged catheter at birth. She presented with a shunt infection, which required removal of the flanged catheter tethered to the choroid.

LESSONS

The authors illustrate the safe removal of a posterior-entry flanged ventricular catheter tethered to the choroid plexus using monopolar flexible electrocautery. The removal was monitored with a flexible endoscope inserted from an ipsilateral anterior burr hole and was followed by an endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

Free access

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Cover Journal of Neurosurgery

Editorial. Is the grass greener with night float?

Jonathan J. Yun and John A. Jane Jr.

Open access

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Cover Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons

PulseRider-assisted embolization of a distal anterior cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm: illustrative case

Huy Dang, Patrick Cotton, Tyler Lazaro, A. Basit Khan, Alex N. Hoang, Omar Tanweer, and Daniel M. S. Raper

BACKGROUND

PulseRider is an endovascular device that can be a useful adjunctive device for wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms. However, its use in distal vessels such as the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) has not been widely reported.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors reported the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent coiling of a 6.9-mm distal ACA aneurysm with PulseRider assistance. Using a partially intraaneurysmal deployment technique, the wide-necked aneurysm was successfully embolized, resulting in Raymond-Roy class II occlusion without intra- or periprocedural complications.

LESSONS

This case illustrates a novel approach to treatment for wide-necked distal ACA aneurysms, which can be challenging to treat via traditional endovascular means. PulseRider can be safely used to treat distal ACA aneurysms with minimal residual aneurysm.

Free access

nlm-article

Cover Neurosurgical Focus

Letter to the Editor. Social media in neurosurgery recruitment during COVID-19 and beyond

Nolan J. Brown, Chidinma M. Wilson, and Donald K. E. Detchou

Free access

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Cover Neurosurgical Focus

Virtual education in neurosurgery during the COVID-19 pandemic

Tyler Lazaro, Visish M. Srinivasan, Maryam Rahman, Ashok Asthagiri, Garni Barkhoudarian, Lola B. Chambless, Peter Kan, Ganesh Rao, Brian V. Nahed, and Akash J. Patel

OBJECTIVE

Neurosurgical education in the US has changed significantly as a consequence of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Institutional social distancing requirements have resulted in many neurosurgical programs utilizing video conferencing for educational activities. However, it is unclear how or if these practices should continue after the pandemic. The objective of this study was to characterize virtual education in neurosurgery and understand how it should be utilized after COVID-19.

METHODS

A 24-question, 3-part online survey was administered anonymously to all 117 US neurosurgical residency programs from May 15, 2020, to June 15, 2020. Questions pertained to the current use of virtual conferencing, preferences over traditional conferences, and future inclinations. The Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly agree) was used. Comparisons were calculated using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistical significance was set at 0.05.

RESULTS

One-hundred eight responses were recorded. Overall, 38 respondents (35.2%) were attendings and 70 (64.8%) were trainees. Forty-one respondents (38.0%) indicated attending 5–6 conferences per week and 70 (64.8%) attend national virtual conferences. When considering different conference types, there was no overall preference (scores < 3) for virtual conferences over traditional conferences. In regard to future use, respondents strongly agreed that they would continue the practice at some capacity after the pandemic (median score 5). Overall, respondents agreed that virtual conferences would partially replace traditional conferences (median score 4), whereas they strongly disagreed with the complete replacement of traditional conferences (median score 1). The most common choices for the partial replacement of tradition conferences were case conferences (59/108, 55%) and board preparation (64/108, 59%). Lastly, there was a significant difference in scores for continued use of virtual conferencing in those who attend nationally sponsored conferences (median score 5, n = 70) and those who do not (median score 4, n = 38; U = 1762.50, z = 2.97, r = 0.29, p = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS

Virtual conferences will likely remain an integral part of neurosurgical education after the COVID-19 pandemic has abated. Across the country, residents and faculty report a preference for continued use of virtual conferencing, especially virtual case conferences and board preparation. Some traditional conferences may even be replaced with virtual conferences, in particular those that are more didactic. Furthermore, nationally sponsored virtual conferences have a positive effect on the preferences for continued use of virtual conferences.

Free access

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Cover Journal of Neurosurgery

The impact of a night float system on operative experience in neurosurgery residency

Tyler T. Lazaro, Kalman A. Katlowitz, Patrick J. Karas, Visish M. Srinivasan, Ellen Walls, Gina Collier, Shaan M. Raza, Daniel J. Curry, Alexander E. Ropper, Alfonso Fuentes, Shankar P. Gopinath, Ganesh Rao, and Akash J. Patel

OBJECTIVE

Since the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented duty-hour restrictions in 2003, many residency programs have adopted a night float system to comply with time constraints. However, some surgical subspecialities have been concerned that use of a night float system deprives residents of operative experience. In this study, the authors describe their training program’s transition to a night float system and its impact on resident operative experience.

METHODS

The authors conducted a single-program study of resident surgical case volume before and after implementing the night float system at 3 of their 5 hospitals from 2014 to 2020. The authors obtained surgical case numbers from the ACGME case log database.

RESULTS

Junior residents received a concentrated educational experience, whereas senior residents saw a significant decrease from 112 calls/year to 17. Logged cases significantly increased after implementation of the night float system (8846 vs 10,547, p = 0.04), whereas cases at non–night float hospitals remained the same. This increase was concurrent with an increase in hospital cases. This difference was mainly driven by senior resident cases (p = 0.010), as junior and chief residents did not show significant differences in logged cases (p > 0.40). Lead resident cases increased significantly after implementation of the night float system (6852 vs 8860, p = 0.04). When normalized for increased hospital cases, resident case increases were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS

Transitioning to a night float call system at the authors’ institution increased overall resident operative cases, particularly for lead resident surgeons. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend the use of a night float call system to consolidate night calls, which increases junior resident–level educational opportunities and senior resident cases.

Restricted access

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Cover Journal of Neurosurgery

2017 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting Los Angeles, CA • April 22–26, 2017