Predictors of an academic career among fellowship-trained spinal neurosurgeons

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland;
  • | 2 Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; and
  • | 3 Department of Neurological Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Restricted access

Purchase Now

USD  $45.00

Spine - 1 year subscription bundle (Individuals Only)

USD  $376.00

JNS + Pediatrics + Spine - 1 year subscription bundle (Individuals Only)

USD  $612.00
Print or Print + Online

OBJECTIVE

Although fellowship training is becoming increasingly common in neurosurgery, it is unclear which factors predict an academic career trajectory among spinal neurosurgeons. In this study, the authors sought to identify predictors associated with academic career placement among fellowship-trained neurological spinal surgeons.

METHODS

Demographic data and bibliometric information on neurosurgeons who completed a residency program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education between 1983 and 2019 were gathered, and those who completed a spine fellowship were identified. Employment was denoted as academic if the hospital where a neurosurgeon worked was affiliated with a neurosurgical residency program; all other positions were denoted as nonacademic. A logistic regression model was used for multivariate statistical analysis.

RESULTS

A total of 376 fellowship-trained spinal neurosurgeons were identified, of whom 140 (37.2%) held academic positions. The top 5 programs that graduated the most fellows in the cohort were Cleveland Clinic, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, University of Miami, Barrow Neurological Institute, and Northwestern University. On multivariate analysis, increased protected research time during residency (OR 1.03, p = 0.044), a higher h-index during residency (OR 1.12, p < 0.001), completing more than one clinical fellowship (OR 2.16, p = 0.024), and attending any of the top 5 programs that graduated the most fellows (OR 2.01, p = 0.0069) were independently associated with an academic career trajectory.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased protected research time during residency, a higher h-index during residency, completing more than one clinical fellowship, and attending one of the 5 programs graduating the most fellowship-trained neurosurgical spinal surgeons independently predicted an academic career. These results may be useful in identifying and advising trainees interested in academic spine neurosurgery.

ABBREVIATIONS

ACGME = Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education; DO = Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine; MD = Medical Doctor; PhD = Doctor of Philosophy; VIF = variance inflation factor.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table 1 (PDF 407 KB)

Spine - 1 year subscription bundle (Individuals Only)

USD  $376.00

JNS + Pediatrics + Spine - 1 year subscription bundle (Individuals Only)

USD  $612.00
  • 1

    Sarkiss CA, Riley KJ, Hernandez CM, et al. Academic productivity of US neurosurgery residents as measured by h-index: program ranking with correlation to faculty productivity. Neurosurgery. 2017;80(6):975984.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    Ormond DR, Abozeid M, Kurpad S, Haines SJ. For the further training of individuals in neurosurgery II: the academic legacy of the William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship. J Neurosurg. 2021;134(1):304313.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3

    Ragel BT, Klimo P Jr, Grant GA, et al. Economic analysis of the military health professions scholarship program for neurosurgeons. Neurosurgery. 2011;69(3):525532.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4

    Crowley RW, Asthagiri AR, Starke RM, et al. In-training factors predictive of choosing and sustaining a productive academic career path in neurological surgery. Neurosurgery. 2012;70(4):10241032.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5

    Khalafallah AM, Jimenez AE, Caplan JM, et al. Predictors of an academic career among fellowship-trained open vascular and endovascular neurosurgeons. J Neurosurg. 2021;134(4):11731181.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6

    Khalafallah AM, Jimenez AE, Mukherjee D. Predictors of academic career trajectory among fellowship-trained neurosurgical oncologists. J Cancer Educ. Published online July 19, 2020. doi: 10.1007/s13187-020-01833-y

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7

    Daniels M, Garzon-Muvdi T, Maxwell R, et al. Preresidency publication number does not predict academic career placement in neurosurgery. World Neurosurg. 2017;101:350356.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8

    Choi BD, DeLong MR, DeLong DM, et al. Impact of PhD training on scholarship in a neurosurgical career. J Neurosurg. 2014;120(3):730735.

  • 9

    Khalafallah AM, Jimenez AE, Tamargo RJ, et al. Impact of master’s degree attainment upon academic career placement in neurosurgery. J Neurosurg. 2021;134(1):295303.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10

    Dorsey ER, Raphael BA, Balcer LJ, Galetta SL. Predictors of future publication record and academic rank in a cohort of neurology residents. Neurology. 2006;67(8):13351337.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11

    Grimm LJ, Shapiro LM, Singhapricha T, et al. Predictors of an academic career on radiology residency applications. Acad Radiol. 2014;21(5):685690.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12

    Khalafallah AM, Jimenez AE, Daniels M, et al. Educational program rankings are independently associated with residents’ academic career trajectory in neurological surgery. J Surg Educ. 2020;77(5):13121320.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13

    Sheather SJ. Diagnostics and transformations for multiple linear regression. In: Sheather SJ, ed. A Modern Approach to Regression with R. Springer; 2009:151225.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14

    Brem H, Amundson E. Preparing Hopkins medical students for a career in academic neurosurgery. Surgery. 2003;134(3):414415.

  • 15

    Karsy M, Henderson F, Tenny S, et al. Attitudes and opinions of US neurosurgical residents toward research and scholarship: a national survey. J Neurosurg. 2018;131(1):252263.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16

    Lawton MT, Narvid J, Quiñones-Hinojosa A. Predictors of neurosurgical career choice among residents and residency applicants. Neurosurgery. 2007;60(5):934939.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17

    Gelinne A, Zuckerman S, Benzil D, et al. United States Medical Licensing Exam Step I score as a predictor of neurosurgical career beyond residency. Neurosurgery. 2019;84(5):10281034.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18

    Campbell PG, Awe OO, Maltenfort MG, et al. Medical school and residency influence on choice of an academic career and academic productivity among neurosurgery faculty in the United States. Clinical article. J Neurosurg. 2011;115(2):380386.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19

    Park DK, Rhee JM, Wu B, Easley K. Factors related to choosing an academic career track among spine fellowship applicants. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013;38(5):425433.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20

    McClelland S III. Pre-residency peer-reviewed publications are associated with neurosurgery resident choice of academic compared to private practice careers. J Clin Neurosci. 2010;17(3):287289.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21

    Mahajan UV, Wadhwa H, Fatemi P, et al. Does double-blinded peer review impact gender authorship trends? An evaluation of two leading neurosurgical journals from 2010 to 2019. J Neurosurg. Published online November 13, 2020. doi: 10.3171/2020.6.JNS20902

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22

    Hauptman JS, Chow DS, Martin NA, Itagaki MW. Research productivity in neurosurgery: trends in globalization, scientific focus, and funding. J Neurosurg. 2011;115(6):12621272.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 434 434 23
Full Text Views 95 95 2
PDF Downloads 111 111 3
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0