Examining the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System versus the Scoliosis Research Society–22r in adult spinal deformity

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OBJECTIVE

After using PROsetta Stone crosswalk tables to calculate Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) and Pain Interference (PI) scores, the authors sought to examine 1) correlations with Scoliosis Research Society–22r (SRS-22r) scores, 2) responsiveness to change, and 3) the relationship between baseline scores and 2-year follow-up scores in adult spinal deformity (ASD).

METHODS

PROsetta Stone crosswalk tables were used to converted SF-36 scores to PROMIS scores for pain and physical function in a cohort of ASD patients with 2-year follow-up. Spearman correlations were used to evaluate the relationship of PROMIS scores with SRS-22r scores. Effect size (ES) and adjusted standardized response mean (aSRM) were used to assess responsiveness to change. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association between baseline scores and 2-year follow-up scores.

RESULTS

In total, 425 (425/625, 68%) patients met inclusion criteria. Strong correlations (all |r| > 0.7, p < 0.001) were found between baseline and 2-year PROMIS values and corresponding SRS-22r domain scores. PROMIS-PI showed a large ES (1.09) and aSRM (0.88), indicating good responsiveness to change. PROMIS-PF showed a moderate ES (0.52) and moderate aSRM (0.69), indicating a moderate responsiveness to change. Patients with greater baseline pain complaints were associated with greater pain improvement at 2 years for both SRS-22r Pain (B = 0.39, p < 0.001) and PROMIS-PI (B = 0.45, p < 0.001). Higher functional scores at baseline were associated with greater average improvements in both SRS-22r Activity (B = 0.62, p < 0.001) and PROMIS-PF (B = 0.40, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

The authors found strong correlations between the SRS-22r Pain and Activity domains with corresponding PROMIS-PI and -PF scores. Pain measurements showed similar and strong ES and aSRM while the function measurements showed similar, moderate ES and aSRM at 2-year follow-up. These data support further exploration of the use of PROMIS–computer adaptive test instruments in ASD.

ABBREVIATIONS ASD = adult spinal deformity; aSRM = adjusted standardized response mean; BP = Bodily Pain; CAT = computer adaptive test; ES = effect size; HRQOL = health-related quality of life; ODI = Oswestry Disability Index; PCS = Physical Component Summary; PF = Physical Function; PI = Pain Interference; PROMIS = Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System; SF-36 = Short Form–36; SRM = standardized response mean; SRS-22r = Scoliosis Research Society–22r.
Article Information

Contributor Notes

Correspondence Michael P. Kelly: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. kellymi@wustl.edu.INCLUDE WHEN CITING Published online February 22, 2019; DOI: 10.3171/2018.11.SPINE181014.Disclosures Dr. Kelly reports receiving clinical or research support for the study described (includes equipment or material) from DePuy Synthes Spine. Dr. Shaffrey reports being a consultant for Medtronic, NuVasive, and EOS; direct stock ownership in NuVasive; and being a patent holder for Medtronic, NuVasive, and Zimmer Biomet. Dr. Smith reports being a consultant for Zimmer Biomet, NuVasive, K2M, AlloSource, and Cerapedics; receiving royalties from Zimmer Biomet; and receiving fellowship funding from NREF and AOSpine. Dr. Burton reports receiving clinical or research support for the study described (includes equipment or material) from DePuy Synthes Spine, Pfizer, and Bioventus; and being a consultant for DePuy Synthes Spine and AlloSource. Dr. Ames reports being an employee of UCSF; being a consultant for DePuy Synthes Spine, Medtronic, Stryker, Medicrea, K2M, and Biomet Zimmer; receiving royalties from Stryker, Biomet Zimmer, DePuy Synthes Spine, NuVasive, Next Orthosurgical, K2M, and Medicrea; performing research for Biomet Zimmer, DePuy Synthes Spine, and ISSG; serving on the editorial board of Operative Neurosurgery; receiving grant funding from SRS; serving on the Executive Committee of ISSG; and serving as director of Global Spine Analytics. Dr. Lafage reports direct stock ownership in Nemaris, Inc.; oversight of support of non–study-related clinical or research effort for DePuy Synthes Spine, NuVasive, K2M, and Stryker and of grants from NASS and SRS; and having speaking/teaching arrangements with AOSpine, DePuy Synthes Spine, and K2M. Dr. Schwab reports direct stock ownership in Nemaris, Inc.; oversight of support of non–study-related clinical or research effort for DePuy Synthes Spine, NuVasive, K2M, and Stryker and grants paid through ISSGF; being a consultant for Zimmer Biomet, K2M, MSD, NuVasive, and Medicrea; and having speaking/teaching arrangements with Zimmer Biomet, K2M, MSD, and NuVasive. Dr. Klineberg reports being a consultant for DePuy Synthes Spine, Stryker, K2M, Springer, Trevana, AlloSource, and AOSpine; and receiving a grant from AOSpine. Dr. Bess reports being a consultant for EOS, K2M, Misonix, and AlloSource; being a patent holder for K2M; receiving clinical or research support for the study described (includes equipment or material) from the International Spine Study Group Foundation; and oversight of support of non–study-related clinical or research effort for the International Spine Study Group Foundation.DePuy Synthes Spine provides direct research support to the International Spine Study Group Foundation.
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