Rate of instrumentation changes on postoperative and follow-up radiographs after primary complex spinal fusion (five or more levels) for adult deformity correction

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  • 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; and
  • | 2 Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
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OBJECTIVE

In the United States, healthcare expenditures have been soaring at a concerning rate. There has been an excessive use of postoperative radiographs after spine surgery and this has been a target for hospitals to reduce unnecessary costs. However, there are only limited data identifying the rate of instrumentation changes on radiographs after complex spine surgery involving ≥ 5-level fusions.

METHODS

The medical records of 136 adult (≥ 18 years old) patients with spine deformity undergoing elective, primary complex spinal fusion (≥ 5 levels) for deformity correction at a major academic institution between 2010 and 2015 were reviewed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and intra- and postoperative complication rates were collected for each patient. The authors reviewed the first 5 subsequent postoperative and follow-up radiographs, and determined whether revision of surgery was performed within 5 years postoperatively. The primary outcome investigated in this study was the rate of hardware changes on follow-up radiographs.

RESULTS

The majority of patients were female, with a mean age of 53.8 ± 20.0 years and a body mass index of 27.3 ± 6.2 kg/m2 (parametric data are expressed as the mean ± SD). The median number of fusion levels was 9 (interquartile range 7–13), with a mean length of surgery of 327.8 ± 124.7 minutes and an estimated blood loss of 1312.1 ± 1269.2 ml. The mean length of hospital stay was 6.6 ± 3.9 days, with a 30-day readmission rate of 14.0%. Postoperative and follow-up change in stability on radiographs (days from operation) included: image 1 (4.6 ± 9.3 days) 0.0%; image 2 (51.7 ± 49.9 days) 3.0%; image 3 (142.1 ± 179.8 days) 5.6%; image 4 (277.3 ± 272.5 days) 11.3%; and image 5 (463.1 ± 525.9 days) 15.7%. The 3rd year after surgery had the highest rate of hardware revision (5.55%), followed by the 2nd year (4.68%), and the 1st year (4.54%).

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that the rate of instrumentation changes on radiographs increases over time, with no changes occurring at the first postoperative image. In an era of cost-conscious healthcare, fewer orders for early radiographs after complex spinal fusions (≥ 5 levels) may not impact patient care and can reduce the overall use of healthcare resources.

ABBREVIATIONS

AFib = atrial fibrillation; BMI = body mass index; CAD = coronary artery disease; CHF = congestive heart failure; CKD = chronic kidney disease; COPD = chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; DVT = deep venous thrombosis; EBL = estimated blood loss; EMG = electromyography; HLD = hyperlipidemia; HTN = hypertension; IQR = interquartile range; LOS = length of hospital stay; MI = myocardial infarction; PE = pulmonary embolism; PRBC = packed red blood cell; PVD = peripheral vascular disease; SSEP = somatosensory evoked potential; SSI = surgical site infection; TcMEP = transcranial motor evoked potential; UTI = urinary tract infection.

Image from Barath et al. (pp 332–336).

 

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Contributor Notes

Correspondence Aladine A. Elsamadicy: Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. elsamadicy.aladine@gmail.com.

INCLUDE WHEN CITING Published online January 11, 2019; DOI: 10.3171/2018.9.SPINE18686.

Disclosures Dr. Karikari is a consultant for NuVasive/DePuy.

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