Results of the AANS membership survey of adult spinal deformity knowledge: impact of training, practice experience, and assessment of potential areas for improved education

Clinical article

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  • 1 Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, California;
  • 2 Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois;
  • 3 Neurosurgery Service, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland;
  • 4 Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia;
  • 5 Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; and
  • 6 Department of Neurological Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
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Object

Adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery is increasing in the spinal neurosurgeon's practice.

Methods

A survey of neurosurgeon AANS membership assessed the deformity knowledge base and impact of current training, education, and practice experience to identify opportunities for improved education. Eleven questions developed and agreed upon by experienced spinal deformity surgeons tested ASD knowledge and were subgrouped into 5 categories: 1) radiology/spinopelvic alignment, 2) health-related quality of life, 3) surgical indications, 4) operative technique, and 5) clinical evaluation. Chi-square analysis was used to compare differences based on participant demographic characteristics (years of practice, spinal surgery fellowship training, percentage of practice comprising spinal surgery).

Results

Responses were received from 1456 neurosurgeons. Of these respondents, 57% had practiced less than 10 years, 20% had completed a spine fellowship, and 32% devoted more than 75% of their practice to spine. The overall correct answer percentage was 42%. Radiology/spinal pelvic alignment questions had the lowest percentage of correct answers (38%), while clinical evaluation and surgical indications questions had the highest percentage (44%). More than 10 years in practice, completion of a spine fellowship, and more than 75% spine practice were associated with greater overall percentage correct (p < 0.001). More than 10 years in practice was significantly associated with increased percentage of correct answers in 4 of 5 categories. Spine fellowship and more than 75% spine practice were significantly associated with increased percentage correct in all categories. Interestingly, the highest error was seen in risk for postoperative coronal imbalance, with a very low rate of correct responses (15%) and not significantly improved with fellowship (18%, p = 0.08).

Conclusions

The results of this survey suggest that ASD knowledge could be improved in neurosurgery. Knowledge may be augmented with neurosurgical experience, spinal surgery fellowships, and spinal specialization. Neurosurgical education should particularly focus on radiology/spinal pelvic alignment, especially pelvic obliquity and coronal imbalance and operative techniques for ASD.

Abbreviations used in this paper:AANS = American Association of Neurological Surgeons; ASD = adult spinal deformity; HRQOL = health-related quality of life; PPA = percent positive agreement; SANS = Self-Assessment in Neurological Surgery.

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Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to: Christopher P. Ames, M.D., University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurological Surgery, 505 Parnassus Ave., Rm. M779, San Francisco, CA 94143-0112. email: amesc@neurosurg.ucsf.edu.

Please include this information when citing this paper: published online July 18, 2014; DOI: 10.3171/2014.5.SPINE121146.

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