Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 772 items for :

  • AO Spine B3 x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Free access

An updated management algorithm for incorporating minimally invasive techniques to treat thoracolumbar trauma

Jacob K. Greenberg, Stephen Shelby Burks, Christopher F. Dibble, Saad Javeed, Vivek P. Gupta, Alexander T. Yahanda, Roberto J. Perez-Roman, Vaidya Govindarajan, Andrew T. Dailey, Sanjay Dhall, Daniel J. Hoh, Daniel E. Gelb, Adam S. Kanter, Eric O. Klineberg, Michael J. Lee, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Paul Park, Charles A. Sansur, Khoi D. Than, Jon J. W. Yoon, Michael Y. Wang, and Wilson Z. Ray

Classification and Severity Score (TLICS). 3–5 These systems are compared in Table 1 . While these classifications help stratify injury severity and distinguish operative from nonoperative injuries, the optimal approach to treating surgical injuries remains an ongoing source of controversy. TABLE 1. A comparison of AO Spine, TLICS, and McAfee grading systems for thoracolumbar trauma McAfee TLICS AO Spine Burst w/o definite PLC injury 2–4 + N A3–4 + N Burst w/ PLC injury 5 + N A3–4 + B1–2 + N Distraction injury 7 + N B

Free access

An updated management algorithm for incorporating minimally invasive techniques to treat thoracolumbar trauma

Jacob K. Greenberg, Stephen Shelby Burks, Christopher F. Dibble, Saad Javeed, Vivek P. Gupta, Alexander T. Yahanda, Roberto J. Perez-Roman, Vaidya Govindarajan, Andrew T. Dailey, Sanjay Dhall, Daniel J. Hoh, Daniel E. Gelb, Adam S. Kanter, Eric O. Klineberg, Michael J. Lee, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Paul Park, Charles A. Sansur, Khoi D. Than, Jon J. W. Yoon, Michael Y. Wang, and Wilson Z. Ray

Classification and Severity Score (TLICS). 3–5 These systems are compared in Table 1 . While these classifications help stratify injury severity and distinguish operative from nonoperative injuries, the optimal approach to treating surgical injuries remains an ongoing source of controversy. TABLE 1. A comparison of AO Spine, TLICS, and McAfee grading systems for thoracolumbar trauma McAfee TLICS AO Spine Burst w/o definite PLC injury 2–4 + N A3–4 + N Burst w/ PLC injury 5 + N A3–4 + B1–2 + N Distraction injury 7 + N B

Free access

Abstracts of the Ninth Annual Meeting of the Lumbar Spine Research Society Chicago, Illinois • April 14–15, 2016

.3171/2016.4.FOC-LSRSabstracts 2016.4.FOC-LSRSABSTRACTS Abstracts Paper #13. Predictors of Discharge to a Non-Home Facility in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Decompression without Fusion for Degenerative Spine Disease: An ACS-NSQIP Study Meghan Murphy , M.D. 1 , Patrick Maloney , M.D. 2 , Brandon McCutcheon , M.D. 2 , Panagiotis Kerezoudis , M.D. 2 , Daniel Ubl , B.A. 3 , Cynthia Crowson , M.S. 3 , and Mohamad Bydon , M.D. 4 1 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, 2 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Free access

Abstracts of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the Lumbar Spine Research Society Chicago, Illinois • April 9–10, 2015

scan to upright radiographs over time. Measurements were correlated with initial fracture direction, region of injury, demographic data, and injury severity using the TLICS and AO classification systems. Results Ninety-nine eligible patients were included with a mean age of 45.8 years (±20.1). Overall, the average change initially was 4.5 degrees and at twelve weeks 7.8 degrees. AO type A fractures initially demonstrated 4.0 degrees of change that increased to 6.3 degrees by twelve weeks. Conversely, AO type B fractures had 6.3 degrees of change initially that

Free access

Oral Presentations 2015 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting Washington, DC • May 2–6, 2015

Published online August 1, 2015; DOI: 10.3171/2015.8.JNS.AANS2015abstracts

Introduction Simulated practice may improve performance in endoscopic Neurosurgery. Using the NeuroTouch haptic simulation platform, we evaluated resident performance and assessed the effect of training on performance in the operating room. Methods First-(N=3) and second-(N=3) year residents were assessed using 6 measures: A) endoscope orientation, B) arm position, C) pedal placement/operation, D) instrument handling, E) instrument following with endoscope, and F) performance of the designated task (locating/drilling the sphenoid ostia and introducing the endoscope

Open access

Effect of surgical experience and spine subspecialty on the reliability of the AO Spine Upper Cervical Injury Classification System

Mark J. Lambrechts, Gregory D. Schroeder, Brian A. Karamian, Jose A. Canseco, F. Cumhur Oner, Lorin M. Benneker, Richard J. Bransford, Frank Kandziora, Shanmuganathan Rajasekaran, Mohammad El-Sharkawi, Rishi Kanna, Andrei Fernandes Joaquim, Klaus Schnake, Christopher K. Kepler, Alexander R. Vaccaro, and the AO Spine Upper Cervical Injury Classification International Members

. TABLE 1. Total number of upper cervical spine injuries evaluated as categorized by the AO Spine Upper Cervical Injury Classification System Classification No. of Validation Cases Injury location  I 4  II 10  III 11 Injury type  A 10  B 7  C 8 Injury subtype  IA 2  IB 0  IC 2  IIA 4  IIB 4  IIC 2  IIIA 4  IIIB 3  IIIC 4 Comparison to the Gold Standard—Surgical Experience When evaluating the

Restricted access

Arachnoiditis ossificans of the cauda equina

Case report and review of the literature

Alexis Faure, Mansour Khalfallah, Brigitte Perrouin-Verbe, Florence Caillon, Cedric Deschamps, Eric Bord, Jean-François Mathe, and Roger Robert

level. Fig. 3. Magnetic resonance images of the lumbosacral spine. Left: Sagittal T 1 -weighted image. Right: Sagittal T 2 -weighted image. Note the fusion of the graft in L-4, with obliteration of the L3–4 and L4–5 disc space, and posttraumatic pseudomeningocele with nerve roots lying posteriorly. Marked hypointensity resulting from the calcification is apparent around the nerve roots. Discussion The true incidence of spinal AO is uncertain; all series are based on cases published in the literature. 11, 19, 24, 26 Generally, AO extends

Open access

Evolution of the AO Spine Sacral and Pelvic Classification System: a systematic review

Barry Ting Sheen Kweh, Jin W. Tee, F. Cumhur Oner, Klaus J. Schnake, Emiliano N. Vialle, Frank Kanziora, Shanmuganathan Rajasekaran, Marcel Dvorak, Jens R. Chapman, Lorin M. Benneker, Gregory Schroeder, and Alexander R. Vaccaro

coccygeal or ligamentous avulsion injuries. Sacral A2 subtype fractures are nondisplaced transverse fractures below the level of the sacroiliac joint, whereas sacral A3 subtype fractures are displaced transverse fractures below the level of the sacroiliac joint. © AO Spine, AO Foundation, published with permission. Figure is available in color online only. Second, on superficial inspection of type B posterior pelvic injuries within the AO system it would seem that this category merely consists of the familiar unilateral vertical sacral fractures without disruption

Restricted access

Is there a regional difference in morphology interpretation of A3 and A4 fractures among different cultures?

Gregory D. Schroeder, Christopher K. Kepler, John D. Koerner, Jens R. Chapman, Carlo Bellabarba, F. Cumhur Oner, Max Reinhold, Marcel F. Dvorak, Bizhan Aarabi, Luiz Vialle, Michael G. Fehlings, Shanmuganathan Rajasekaran, Frank Kandziora, Klaus J. Schnake, and Alexander R. Vaccaro

ability of TLICS to provide guidance for these patients has been criticized as the major flaw of the system as well as other contemporary classification systems. 8 , 12 , 18 In 2013, Vaccaro et al. published the new AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System, 24 which incorporates the strengths of the previous Magerl/AO system 11 and the TLICS. 23 The AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System first categorizes fractures by morphological type. Type A injuries are compression injuries; Type B injuries indicate a disruption of the anterior

Free access

Does displacement of cervical and thoracolumbar dislocation-translation injuries predict spinal cord injury or recovery?

Mark J. Lambrechts, Nicholas D. D’Antonio, Brian A. Karamian, Arun P. Kanhere, Azra Dees, Bright M. Wiafe, Jose A. Canseco, Barrett I. Woods, I. David Kaye, Jeffrey Rihn, Mark Kurd, Alan S. Hilibrand, Christopher K. Kepler, Alexander R. Vaccaro, and Gregory D. Schroeder

T he AO Spine Subaxial Injury Classification System and the AO Spine Thoracolumbar Injury Classification System denote type C injuries as dislocation-translation injuries, defined as translation of a vertebral body in any plane. 1 , 2 The predominant injury mechanism is high-energy trauma, often a result of motor vehicle collisions. 3 , 4 Due to the significant and severe bony and/or ligamentous disruption associated with these injuries, type C injuries are highly unstable and require urgent operative decompression and stabilization because patients are