Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 842 items for :

  • "vestibular schwannoma" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Robert G. Ojemann, Robert A. Levine, William M. Montgomery and Patricia McGaffigan

I t is well established that in some patients with an acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) useful hearing can be retained following removal of the tumor, but in others there is no hearing postoperatively even though the cochlear nerve is left apparently anatomically intact. In 1977, we began using click-evoked potentials during surgery to provide more immediate feedback about the status of the inner ear, cochlear nerve, and brain stem, to study whether this adjunct would help improve the ability to preserve hearing. The initial technique of monitoring has

Restricted access

Derek S. Gordon and Alan G. Kerr

: Common complications following removal of vestibular schwannoma. Adv Otorhinolaryngol 31 : 228 – 239 , 1983 Montgomery WW: Common complications following removal of vestibular schwannoma. Adv Otorhinolaryngol 31: 228–239, 1983 3. Rhoton AL Jr : Microsurgery of the internal acoustic meatus. Surg Neurol 2 : 311 – 318 , 1974 Rhoton AL Jr: Microsurgery of the internal acoustic meatus. Surg Neurol 2: 311–318, 1974

Restricted access

Lindsay Symon and Malcolm F. Pell

: 258–261, 1982 9. King TT : Results and complications of translabyrinthine and transtentorial approaches to 60 acoustic tumours. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 38 : 411 , 1975 (Abstract) King TT: Results and complications of translabyrinthine and transtentorial approaches to 60 acoustic tumours. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 38: 411, 1975 (Abstract) 10. Montgomery WW : Common complications following removal of vestibular schwannoma. Adv Otorhinolaryngol 31 : 228 – 239 , 1983 Montgomery WW

Restricted access

1992 76 6 10.3171/jns.1992.76.6.1047a Major Histocompatibility Antigens in Murine Tumors June 1992 76 6 10.3171/jns.1992.76.6.1048 Pathogenesis of Sickle-Cell Anemia and Aneurysm June 1992 76 6 10.3171/jns.1992.76.6.1050 Intracranial Aneurysms in Sickle-Cell Anemia June 1992 76 6 10.3171/jns.1992.76.6.1051 Mesencephalotomy for Cancer Pain June 1992 76 6 10.3171/jns.1992.76.6.1052 Vestibular schwannomas C. Keith Whittaker Charles M. Luetje June 1992 76 6 897 900 10.3171/jns.1992.76.6.0897 Current results of the retrosigmoid

Restricted access

C. Keith Whittaker and Charles M. Luetje

the total number of cases. In the series of Fischer, et al. , 3 postoperative results showed that eight patients had “good” hearing (speech reception threshold (SRT) < 30 dB and SDS > 70%) and four patients had “serviceable” hearing (SRT < 50 dB and SDS > 50%), from a total of 99 cases with preoperative hearing (“not deaf” = pure tone average on audiogram > 70 dB). This translates to a success score for useful hearing of 13% by the authors' criteria. TABLE 1 Postoperative hearing in published series of patients with vestibular schwannoma

Restricted access

surgery. J Neurosurg 76: 910–917, June, 1992), regarding hearing preservation techniques and results for acoustic neurinoma surgery as well as the accompanying guest editorial (Whittaker CK, Luetje CM: Vestibular schwannomas. Guest editorial. J Neurosurg 76: 897–900, June, 1992). Both series and the editorial provide excellent descriptions and comments on modern microsurgical techniques for attempts at hearing preservation in patients with preoperative hearing and acoustic tumors. These large series represent state-of-the-art reports for the management of acoustic

Restricted access

Mark E. Linskey, A. Julio Martinez, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, Ann H. Maitz, Theresa Whiteside and L. Dade Lunsford

D espite extensive clinical experience, 20, 22–25, 29, 30 the radiobiological mechanisms leading to tumor control after stereotactic radiosurgery of acoustic (vestibular) schwannomas remain largely unknown. Current dose selection criteria goals are empirically based on clinical studies suggesting that single radiation doses to the tumor margin of between 12 and 20 Gy are sufficient to control tumor growth in 86% to 95% of patients and are associated with minimal risk to adjacent cranial nerves. 22–25, 29, 30 There are two main reasons for the lack of

Restricted access

Stephen J. Haines and Samuel C. Levine

neurinomas. Neurosurgery 29 : 189 – 199 , 1991 Samii M, Matthies C, Tatagiba M: Intracanalicular acoustic neurinomas. Neurosurgery 29: 189–199, 1991 16. Schuknecht HF : Pathology of vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neurinoma) , in Silverstein H , Norrell H (eds): Neurological Surgery of the Ear. Birmingham, Ala : Aesculapius , 1977 , pp 193 – 197 Schuknecht HF: Pathology of vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neurinoma), in Silverstein H, Norrell H (eds): Neurological Surgery of the Ear. Birmingham

Restricted access

Juha Jääskeläinen, Anders Paetau, Ilmari Pyykkö, Göran Blomstedt, Tauno Palva and Henry Troupp

, such a plane is usually achievable by meticulous dissection. Indeed, it has often been suggested that the plane is always there and finding it separates the excellent from the ordinary surgeon. This microsurgical clarity is obscured by histological studies of the interface of vestibular schwannoma and the cochlear nerve. 7–9, 19, 20 Marquet, et al. , 7 studied 10 medium-sized acoustic neurinomas removed en bloc with the cochlear nerve, using immunoperoxidase staining (monoclonal antibody 2F11) against neurofilament protein to identify cochlear nerve fibers in

Restricted access

Kalmon D. Post, Mark B. Eisenberg and Peter J. Catalano

I n today's era of advanced microsurgical techniques and availability of facial nerve monitoring systems, total removal of vestibular schwannomas with preserved facial function can be routinely achieved except in the most difficult of cases. Having overcome many previous hurdles, attention has now been placed on the prediction and eventual preservation of “good” postoperative hearing. In the past it was difficult to analyze hearing preservation results because there was no agreement as to what constituted “hearing.” Some authors considered preservation of