Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16,517 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

William J. German

-traumatic cerebrospinal rhinorrhea.” Such a delayed onset was noted in each of the four traumatic examples in the present report. Two of these patients had recovered from pneumococcus meningitis, under intensive chemotherapy; the rhinorrhea was apparently unaltered by the meningeal infection. One instance of rhinorrhea from a nasal encephalocele is included in the present report, the nasal leak appearing after a considerable interval following intranasal “snare” excision of a “tumor.” Intracranial pneumatocele was noted in one of the traumatic cases. At present there is unanimity of

Restricted access

Joseph A. Mufson and Leo M. Davidoff

I n cushing's series 3 of 2,203 verified intracranial tumors, the meningiomas comprised 13.4 per cent. The incidence has been reported as somewhat higher by others (Olivecrona, 13 15.8 per cent; Craig, 16 14.9 per cent; Horrax, 10 19 per cent). Despite its frequent occurrence among brain tumors, the meningioma is rarely seen as a multiple growth unless one includes those cases of centralized neurofibromatosis, a manifestation of von Recklinghausen's disease, in which the dura is often studded with innumerable small meningiomas. Cushing and Eisenhardt 3

Restricted access

Gilbert Horrax

neurosurgical aspect was his discussion in this lecture of the first employment of electrosurgery in the removal of brain tumors. In introducing the subject, Cushing says, When I first had the good fortune to see this loop being used bloodlessly to scoop out bits of tissue from a malignant tumour for purposes of biopsy, I foresaw that a new tool had been put into our hands to facilitate the piecemeal removal of … tumours. With Dr. Bovie's cooperation, during the past few months I have gained sufficient familiarity with the instrument to realize that it holds out untold

Restricted access

The Use of Products Prepared from Human Fibrinogen and Human Thrombin in Neurosurgery

Fibrin Foams as Hemostatic Agents; Fibrin Films in Repair of Dural Defects and in Prevention of Meningocerebral Adhesions

Franc D. Ingraham and Orville T. Bailey

not amenable to treatment by application of muscle. For example, one such instance was in dealing with a blood vessel malformation exposed in the course of an operation for focal epilepsy. The foam proved to be strikingly effective even when such large venous channels had been opened. The same result has been achieved in dealing with openings in dural sinuses. TABLE I Tumor, intracranial or intraspinal 42 Lead encephalopathy 3 Congenital anomaly (Arnold-Chiari, etc.) 21 Depressed fracture 2 Jacksonian epilepsy 7

Restricted access

tumors; and today the coagulating- and cutting-current units are standard equipment in every large civilian and military American operating room. How fascinated and gratified Dr. Cushing would have been could he have known that his pupils in this war, following in his tradition, have similarly been inspired to positive achievement. Eagerly would he have read Hugh Cairns and Howard Florey's epic report 2 on the use of penicillin in the campaign in Sicily, particularly as it was applied in dealing with head injuries; and, more recently, he would have heartily welcomed

Restricted access

Intracranial Dural Cyst

With Report of a Case

Webb Haymaker and Miles E. Foster Jr.

. Schlesinger , H. Beiträge zur Klinik der Rückenmarks- und Wirbeltumoren. Jena: G. Fischer , 1898, 208 pp. 8. Schmidt , A. Cyste der Dura mater spinalis, einen extramedullärem Tumor vortäuschend, mit Erfolg operiert. Dtsch. Z. Nervenheilk. , 1904 , 26 : 318 – 323 . Schmidt , A. Cyste der Dura mater spinalis, einen extramedullärem Tumor vortäuschend, mit Erfolg operiert. Dtsch. Z. Nervenheilk. , 1904, 26: 318–323. 9. Voss , O. Rückenmarkskompression durch eine intradurale Cyste. Dtsch. Z. Chir. , 1936

Restricted access

A. H. S. Holbourn

“intracranial pressure,” having the same value throughout the brain does not adequately describe conditions in the brain where expanding tumours are present. It often appears somewhat as if the hydrostatic pressure were higher near the tumour than elsewhere. It is not sufficiently realised, however, that different hydrostatic pressures could not coexist at two points in the brain unless there also existed non-hydrostatic stresses at other points. It is convenient to divide the six components of stress into two sets of three which are of different types. Three consist of

Restricted access

W. M. Craig

purpose that was inexpensive, of relatively small size, and combined certain essential features that could be universally used by the Army as well as the Navy. At the Naval Medical Center in Bethesda where the usual operating tables were included in the surgical equipment, such an apparatus was designed and the rough model was tried. It proved so valuable for operations on the brain and cervical portion of the spinal cord that the original apparatus was modified by the manufacturer and is now available. † Removal of cerebellar tumors, resections of the eighth and

Restricted access

Franc D. Ingraham, Orville T. Bailey and Frank E. Nulsen

entirely normal. This should tend to indicate that the thrombin is rapidly dispersed by the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid. Before the development of fibrin foam, severe bleeding was treated with thrombin alone in a small group of patients. In one of these the lateral ventricle was entered in relieving a ventricular block caused by a huge glioblastoma multiforme of the left cerebrum, which occluded the left foramen of Monro. An incision was made through the tumor and enough neoplastic tissue was removed to restore the circulation of cerebrospinal fluid. Free

Restricted access

Franc D. Ingraham and Orville T. Bailey

M edulloblastomas are usually considered solid, midline cerebellar tumors of childhood with rapid progression 1 but with excellent, if usually temporary, response to roentgen therapy. Because these characteristics have become so firmly established, it may be of interest to record an instance of cerebellar medulloblastoma which departs clinically in almost all respects from the usual behavior of this tumor but has the typical histological appearance. REPORT OF CASE A single, American school girl of 15 was admitted to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital