Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 225 items for :

  • "transorbital" x
Clear All
Restricted access

William Beecher Scoville

various portions of both frontal lobes were surgically removed. Presented before New York Academy of Medicine , March 18–19, 1948 . Columbia-Greystone Associates . Problems of the human frontal lobe. (Pre- and post-operative studies of a group of psychotic patients from whom various portions of both frontal lobes were surgically removed. Presented before New York Academy of Medicine, March 18–19, 1948. 3. Freeman , W. Transorbital lobotomy. Preliminary report of ten cases. Med. Ann. Distr. Columbia , 1948 , 17 : 257 – 261

Restricted access

John R. Green, R. E. H. Duisberg and W. B. McGrath

procedures, others have been substituted and include: (1) Transorbital lobotomy, by Fiamberti 8 in 1937. (2) Lower quadrant frontal lobotomy, by Hofstatter et al. 12 in 1945. (3) Bilateral frontal gyrectomies, by Penfield 18 in 1947. (4) Thalamotomy, by Spiegel et al . 23, 24 in 1947. (5) Undercutting of various portions of the premotor cortex, by Scoville 22 in 1949. (6) “Topectomy” (the removal of Brodmann's areas 9 and 10), by Pool 6 in 1949. (7) Isolation of the anterior cingulate area (Area 24), by

Restricted access

Malcolm B. Parhad

. Freeman , W. Transorbital leucotomy. Lancet , 1948 , 2 : 371 – 373 . Freeman , W. Transorbital leucotomy. Lancet , 1948, 2: 371–373. 5. Freeman , W. Transorbital lobotomy (survey after from one to three years). Dis. nerv. Syst. , 1949 , 10 : 360 – 363 . Freeman , W. Transorbital lobotomy (survey after from one to three years). Dis. nerv. Syst. , 1949, 10: 360–363. 6. Fulton , J. F. Functional localization in relation to frontal lobotomy. New York & London

Restricted access

William A. Nosik

I n view of the large numbers of transorbital leukotomies being performed it is apparent that this operation is gaining in recognition, and may well account for approximately one-third of the lobotomies performed, according to Freeman and Watts. 3 In his appraisal of this procedure, which he has used in 300 cases, Moore 6, 7, 8 was of the opinion that it possesses a great advantage over other methods of lobotomy in that there are no untoward psychological effects, there is an ease of performance, the hospitalization period is short and nursing care is

Restricted access

Pseudotumor Cerebri George D. Zuidema Solomon J. Cohen September 1954 11 5 433 441 10.3171/jns.1954.11.5.0433 Percutaneous Vertebral Angiography Pierre Namin September 1954 11 5 442 457 10.3171/jns.1954.11.5.0442 Controlled Transorbital Leukotomy William A. Nosik September 1954 11 5 458 462 10.3171/jns.1954.11.5.0458 The Use Of Acth In Conjunction With Surgery For Neoplasms In The Parasellar Area John Raaf Donald L. Stainsby Wilbur L. E. Larson September 1954 11 5 463 470 10.3171/jns.1954

Restricted access

John Martin

), claimed improvement in 3 out of 4 patients, but, as so many reports reveal, there was no control series studied. Hoerster and Jaco 40 studied 21 patients operated upon by transorbital leucotomy, and matched them on age, sex, diagnosis and length of hospitalization with a group receiving electric shock therapy and insulin coma therapy in another state hospital. Distinctly better results were obtained in the leucotomized patients, not only as judged by a variety of clinical factors, but also in eleven functions of the Malamud-Sands scale. COMMENT Scanning world

Restricted access

J. Lawrence Pool, John N. Potanos and Erich G. Krueger

development prior to the stage that may occasion these complications. The method of excision has varied. The transorbital or direct external approach to the frontal sinuses has been utilized in a number of clinics. Gushing, 6 noting dural erosion, recommended frontal craniotomy for the excision of such osteomata to enable the operator to visualize the dura mater and permit its plastic repair, while Horrax 12 recommended frontal craniotomy even if no antecedent infection had occurred. The direct frontal approach through an incision in the brow or hairline to open the

Restricted access

W. B. Hamby

removed, if this is the indication for the operation. Fig. 3. View of extent of removal of bone ( left ) from above and ( right ) transorbitally. Preparation made on a plastic skull model; the inferior orbital fissure is depicted a little larger than usual and the optic foramens are not entirely accurate in this model. Complete hemostasis is secured. Any dural rent is closed. If individual anatomical variants have required the removal of bone of the surface beyond the area covered by the temporal fascia, the defect may be covered with a small prosthesis

Restricted access

Murray A. Falconer, Ian C. Bailey and Leo W. Duchen

; removal of tumor dome; long convalescence, meningitis radiation; no improvement chondroma died 5 yrs postop; static unimproved course 3 transorbital ethmoidectomy, temporary improvement; later radiation, no improvement frontal; partial intracapsular removal, later more radical intracapsular removal; long convalescence, meningitis — chordoma died 4 mos postop 4 radiation therapy, no improvement frontal; biopsy; long convalescence — chordoma died 6 mos postop 5 — lateral; intracapsular removal; marked improvement

Restricted access

Edgar M. Housepian

intraorbital surgical removal but that all other cases should be treated by irradiation. Later, Chutorian and his coworkers 2 at the same institution found four cases of recurrent optic nerve glioma following radiotherapy. One of these had been reported by Taveras, et al. , 11 as free of recurrence after 21 years. Some ophthalmological surgeons have advocated transorbital excision of optic nerve gliomas as adequate therapy. 10, 14 In one of the 13 cases in this report, the tumor recurred with chiasmal spread 6 years after orbital resection. These experiences lend