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Yun-Sik Dho, Yong Hwy Kim, Young-Bem Se, Doo Hee Han, Jung Hee Kim, Chul-Kee Park, Kyu-Chang Wang and Dong Gyu Kim

on these outcomes. We categorized craniopharyngiomas according to their spatial and anatomical relationships with the pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, diaphragma sellae, and infundibulum, as suggested by previous studies, and we analyzed the surgical outcome of EEA. Methods After receiving approval from the institutional review board, we retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records and imaging data of patients who underwent endoscopic endonasal resection of craniopharyngiomas. Between July 2010 and March 2016, 90 adult patients underwent surgery at our

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Akira Shintani, Nicholas T. Zervas, Akio Kuwayama, Johanna Pallotta and Richard Spark

E xperimental section of the pituitary stalk is often required for study of the interaction of the nervous and endocrine systems. A subtemporal approach to hypophysectomy, or section of the pituitary stalk in primates, has been described by Kendall and Roth. 9 However, intracranial operation requires manipulation of the brain and consequently may introduce new variables. We have previously described stereotaxic hypophysectomy through the orbit in primates in which ablation of the pituitary gland was achieved with minimal side effects. 14 This report

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Kanaris P. Panagopoulos, Ferenc A. Jolesz, Mustapha El-Azouzi and Peter McL. Black

S mall mucinous cysts within the pituitary gland have been reported in as many as 22% of normal postmortem specimens. 11 Like craniopharyngiomas, they appear to derive from Rathke's pouch but are lined with cuboidal or columnar rather than squamous epithelium and often contain cilia and goblet cells. There is controversy over whether they should be considered neoplasms. 2, 5 Cysts of the pituitary stalk are much less common. Clinical manifestations are usually the result of pressure on the optic pathways, hypothalamus, and pituitary gland. 4, 8 Two cases

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Catherine Lafitte, Bruno Aesch, Françoise Henry-Lebras, Franck Fetissof and Michel Jan

pituitary stalk (42 cases) and in the posterior hypophysis (49 cases). In 1951, Luthy and Klinger 18 reported the first case of symptomatic granular cell tumor of the posterior hypophysis, which was treated by partial surgical ablation. Since the initial description of granular cell tumors, their histogenesis has been the object of considerable conjecture and, consequently, various terms have been used to name them including: choristoma, granular myoblastoma, and granular pituicytoma. Due to advances in electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, the histogenesis is

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Russell R. Lonser, John A. Butman, Ruwan Kiringoda, Debbie Song and Edward H. Oldfield

, retina, cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord) and are seldom seen in the supratentorial compartment of the CNS. 11 Despite the uncommon occurrence of hemangioblastomas in the supratentorial compartment of the CNS, recent reports suggest that when these tumors occur in this anatomical region, they may be found in the pituitary stalk. Current understanding of these lesions is derived from isolated case reports. Because of the limited information on the natural history of pituitary stalk hemangioblastomas, their true incidence, their clinical effects, and optimal

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Juji Takeuchi, Kiyoshi Kikuchi, Yuta Shibamoto and Ichiro Fujisawa

Recently, we treated a small juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma of the pituitary stalk in a 6-year-old girl. The tumor completely disappeared 6 months after irradiation. Case Report This 6-year-old girl first presented with polyuria and polydipsia at the age of 3 years. Her urine output was 3500 to 4200 ml/day. A 4-hour water deprivation test produced mild urinary concentration (from 63 to 163 mOsm/liter), whereas intravenous Pitressin (vasopressin) administration caused remarkable concentration (from 58 to 487 mOsm/liter). Examination Computerized tomography (CT

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Hussam Metwali, Venelin Gerganov and Rudolf Fahlbusch

C raniopharyngiomas are tumors in the central skull base originating from the pituitary stalk. Although patients with intrasellar craniopharyngiomas usually have hormonal disturbances at the time of presentation, in patients with supradiaphragmatic craniopharyngioma, the visual symptoms dominate. 1 , 2 , 4 , 8–18 , 20 , 24 , 32–35 The choice of operative approach for craniopharyngioma resection depends on the surgeon's preference and experience, considering the location and configuration of the tumor. Our current concept of management of

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Edgar G. Ordóñez-Rubiano, Jonathan A. Forbes, Peter F. Morgenstern, Leopold Arko, Georgiana A. Dobri, Jeffrey P. Greenfield, Mark M. Souweidane, Apostolos John Tsiouris, Vijay K. Anand, Ashutosh Kacker and Theodore H. Schwartz

neurovascular structures. 4 , 30 , 31 , 45 There are some cases in which the tumor appears separable from the stalk and stalk preservation is possible. Stalk sacrifice is the alternative strategy that presumably leads to higher rates of endocrinopathy and GTR, but lower rates of recurrence. However, the actual rates of GTR, endocrinopathy, progression, and recurrence after stalk sacrifice are not well understood and are critical to making informed decisions prior to and during surgery. We present a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort of patients who were treated

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Paolo Perrini, Antonio Scollato, Enrico Guidi, Nicola Benedetto, Anna Maria Buccoliero and Nicola Di Lorenzo

T he term tethered cervical spinal cord has broadened with time to include tethering of the cervical cord related to trauma, intradural surgery, and congenital anomalies. 1,–4, 6, 8–10 Congenital tethered cervical spinal cord is a very rare entity and is usually due to a dermal sinus tract stalk entering the subarachnoid space and attaching to neural elements. 1 Patients with tethered cervical cord present with myelopathy, multiradicular pain in upper limbs, numbness, neck pain, Lhermitte sign, and bowel and bladder changes. We present the case of a 20-year

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Paolo Perrini, Antonio Scollato, Enrico Guidi, Nicola Benedetto, Anna Maria Buccoliero and Nicola Di Lorenzo

T he term tethered cervical spinal cord has broadened with time to include tethering of the cervical cord related to trauma, intradural surgery, and congenital anomalies. 1,–4, 6, 8–10 Congenital tethered cervical spinal cord is a very rare entity and is usually due to a dermal sinus tract stalk entering the subarachnoid space and attaching to neural elements. 1 Patients with tethered cervical cord present with myelopathy, multiradicular pain in upper limbs, numbness, neck pain, Lhermitte sign, and bowel and bladder changes. We present the case of a 20-year