Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 25 items for :

  • "spinal cord rotation" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Sean N. Neifert, Lauren K. Grant, Jonathan J. Rasouli, Ian Thomas McNeill, Samuel K. Cho, and John M. Caridi

’s Cobb angle of 224.9°, he met the criteria for vertebral column resection to correct the deformity. 9 Utilizing this technique, excellent correction was accomplished and the present report supports the utilization of vertebral column resection, whereas other deformity correction options would not have provided enough mobility for adequate correction. Furthermore, given the inability of these curves to be corrected with halo traction, very few options other than vertebral column resection exist for these patients. Cases of spinal cord rotation have also been published

Restricted access

Neil A. Martin, Rohit K. Khanna, and Ulrich Batzdorf

degree of bone removal is important to permit subsequent spinal cord rotation ( Fig. 2 ). Next, the facets and pedicles immediately above and below the lesion are removed using a highspeed drill and rongeurs. It is important to remove the pedicle to the level of the floor of the spinal canal ( Fig. 2 ). In the thoracic region, removal of the head of the rib may be added to provide an even flatter angle to the lateral and ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. At the completion of the bone removal, the root sleeve and dorsal root ganglion at the level of the

Restricted access

Sagun K. Tuli, R. John Hurlbert, David Mikulis, and J. F. Ross Fleming

R otation of the spinal cord has been presented in only one published case report. 26 We describe a case of spinal cord rotation associated with excessive epidural lipomatous tissue, with no compression, in a patient with progressive myelopathy. Case Report History This 44-year-old man, a Haitian emigrant, presented with a 4-year history of progressive left leg weakness. He described a dragging heavy sensation in his legs with no sensory complaints or back pain, and was otherwise healthy. He denied use of any medication, smoking, use of ethanol, or

Restricted access

Peter D. Angevine, Christopher Kellner, Raqeeb M. Haque, and Paul C. McCormick

access involve the removal of more lateral bone, including the facet joint, pedicle, or even part of the posterolateral vertebral body. In addition, a paramedian dural incision and gentle spinal cord rotation following suture retraction of detached dentate ligaments are helpful maneuvers that further facilitate ventral exposure and access. In many instances, extramedullary mass lesions are eccentric in location, producing some degree of spinal cord rotation and lateral displacement that can further assist their resection. Even large ventral lesions can usually be

Restricted access

Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor M. Gazi Yaşargil , M.D. , T. Glenn Pait , M.D. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, Arkansas 891 892 We read with great interest the article by Martin and colleagues (Martin NA, Khanna RK, Batzdorf U: Posterolateral cervical or thoracic approach with spinal cord rotation for vascular malformations or tumors of the ventrolateral spinal cord. J Neurosurg 83: 254–261, August, 1995). The authors describe a technique

Restricted access

Hiroshi Ozawa, Takashi Kusakabe, Toshimi Aizawa, Takeshi Nakamura, Yushin Ishii, and Eiji Itoi

intracanal protrusion of the tumors compressing the lateral side of the spinal cord (rotation to the right [A and C] and rotation to the left [B and D] ). The arrowheads show the indentation of the dural tube. Operation We excised the tumors of the C1–2 interlaminar space following resection of the C-1 posterior arch and posterior fusion (occiput–C3) with segmental instrumentation. The tumors seemed to originate from the C-2 nerve root ganglion, and they did not adhere to the dura mater. The tumors were excised in a piecemeal manner. Histologically the tumors

Restricted access

Kazutoshi Hida, Yoshinobu Iwasaki, Satoshi Ushikoshi, Shin Fujimoto, Toshitaka Seki, and Kazuo Miyasaka

and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Neurosurgery 24 : 864 – 872 , 1989 Kojima T, Waga S, Kubo Y, et al: Anterior cervical vertebrectomy and interbody fusion for multi-level spondylosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Neurosurgery 24: 864–872, 1989 21. Martin NA , Khanna RK , Batzdorf U : Posterolateral cervical or thoracic approach with spinal cord rotation for vascular malformations or tumors of the ventrolateral spinal cord. J Neurosurg 83 : 254 – 261

Restricted access

Stephen T. Onesti, Ely Ashkenazi, and W. Jost Michelsen

thoracic and lumbar spine. J Neurosurg 45 : 628 – 637 , 1976 Larson SJ, Holst RA, Hemmy DC, et al: Lateral extracavitary approach to traumatic lesions of the thoracic and lumbar spine. J Neurosurg 45: 628–637, 1976 9. Martin NA , Khanna RK , Batzdorf U : Posterolateral cervical or thoracic approach with spinal cord rotation for vascular malformations or tumors of the ventrolateral spinal cord. J Neurosurg 83 : 254 – 261 , 1995 Martin NA, Khanna RK, Batzdorf U: Posterolateral cervical or thoracic approach

Restricted access

Alexis Victorien Konan, Jean Raymond, and Daniel Roy

. Martin NA , Khanna RK , Batzdorf U : Posterolateral cervical or thoracic approach with spinal cord rotation for vascular malformations or tumors of the ventrolateral spinal cord. J Neurosurg 83 : 254 – 261 , 1995 Martin NA, Khanna RK, Batzdorf U: Posterolateral cervical or thoracic approach with spinal cord rotation for vascular malformations or tumors of the ventrolateral spinal cord. J Neurosurg 83: 254–261, 1995 20. Merland JJ , Reizine D , Laurent A , et al : Embolization of spinal vascular

Free access

Keisuke Takai, Hiroki Kurita, Takayuki Hara, Kensuke Kawai, and Makoto Taniguchi

4 and corpectomy at the C3–T1 levels, 8 but an anterior approach in the thoracic and lumbar regions is difficult and highly invasive. A posterolateral approach (i.e., laminotomy with medial facetectomy and spinal cord rotation technique) can be used to access the ventral spinal cord. 9 Perimedullary AVFs on the ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord are a good indication for the posterolateral approach. With this technique, however, because the ventromedial limit of exposure is the ASA, contralateral branches from the ASA cannot be exposed, whereas