Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 287 items for :

  • "skull base lesion" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Shinichiro Miyazaki, Takanori Fukushima and Takamitsu Fujimaki

with giant aneurysms and advanced occlusive disease in both the anterior and posterior circulation. Their distal bypass grafting site was the proximal posterior cerebral artery or a major branch of the middle cerebral artery. Skull Base Surgery In the past 10 years, new surgical approaches have been reported which permit more aggressive management of tumors and aneurysms involving the skull base. 2, 4, 9, 16 Fish, et al. , 4 described their lateral approach to radical surgery of skull base lesions with carotid artery bypass in five cases, including three

Restricted access

H. Wisoff Rick Abbott Fred Epstein November 1990 73 5 661 667 10.3171/jns.1990.73.5.0661 Zygomatic approach to skull-base lesions Ossama Al-Mefty Vinod K. Anand November 1990 73 5 668 673 10.3171/jns.1990.73.5.0668 Surgical treatment of thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas Ian E. McCutcheon Bruce D. Weintraub Edward H. Oldfield November 1990 73 5 674 683 10.3171/jns.1990.73.5.0674 Long-term follow-up review of 31 children with severe closed head trauma Hanan Costeff Zeev Groswasser

Restricted access

Ossama Al-Mefty and Vinod K. Anand

perfected the infratemporal approach and applied it in the management of a variety of skull-base lesions, including tumors of the infratemporal fossa. This approach is posterior, however, and requires extensive temporal bone drilling to reach anteriorly located masses. Additional disadvantages are conductive hearing loss as a result of blind sac closure of the external auditory canal and the need to sacrifice the lower division of the trigeminal nerve. Recently, a preauricular lateral approach with various modifications has been advocated as the route of choice to this

Restricted access

Ossama Al-Mefty

Adegbite AB, Khan MI, Paine KWE, et al: The recurrence of intracranial meningiomas after surgical treatment. J Neurosurg 58: 51–56, 1983 2. Al-Mefty O : Supraorbital-pterional approach to skull base lesions. Neurosurgery 21 : 474 – 477 , 1987 Al-Mefty O: Supraorbital-pterional approach to skull base lesions. Neurosurgery 21: 474–477, 1987 3. Al-Mefty O : Surgery of the Cranial Base. Boston : Kluwer , 1988 Al-Mefty O: Surgery of the Cranial Base. Boston: Kluwer, 1988 4. Al-Mefty O

Restricted access

Richard A. Bronen and Gordon Sze

, postcontrast T 1 weighted images are generally used in conjunction with T 2 -weighted images for screening purposes. For example, inactive multiple sclerosis plaques often do not enhance with contrast medium. 25, 26 Nevertheless, detection of these lesions on the T 2 -weighted sequence is often very important, particularly in the initial diagnosis. As with iodinated contrast material, Gd-DTPA may obscure certain types of pathology. On contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images, hemorrhage within a lesion may be missed ( Fig. 3 ). Enhancing skull-base lesions, such as glomus

Restricted access

Felix Umansky, Josef Elidan and Alberto Valarezo

petrosal sinus inside the canal. In our study, we found that the sinus opened in close proximity to but never within the osteofibrous channel itself. Thus, we agree with the classic description of the canal boundaries but emphasize the fact that it is located inside a large dural space occupied by a venous confluence into which the inferior petrosal sinus opens and in which Gruber's ligament represents a large fibrous trabecula. References 1. Al-Mefty O : Supraorbital-pterional approach to skull base lesions. Neurosurgery 21 : 474

Restricted access

Laligam N. Sekhar, Anil Nanda, Chandra N. Sen, Carl N. Snyderman and Ivo P. Janecka

brain retraction and a wider exposure. This approach is an extension of previously described approaches; the concept of performing an ethmoidectomy via the cranial exposure to approach middle and posterior skull base lesions is new. Clinical Material and Methods Patient Population During the period from April, 1986, to June, 1990, the extended frontal approach was used in a total of 49 patients. The patients ranged in age from 14 to 73 years, with a mean age of 46 years. There were 20 males and 29 females. The lesions for which the approach was used included

Restricted access

Robert G. Ojemann

microsurgical techniques to skull-base lesions previously thought to be inoperable. Al-Mefty 1 has also reported on the technique of extensive resection of these tumors. While technical achievements are well documented, the use of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, including electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, brain-stem evoked responses, and at times cranial nerve testing, is only briefly mentioned. Monitoring can be helpful but it is expensive. Møller, 5 who is from the same institution as the authors, has published extensively on

Restricted access

any publication, we do not see any originality in the papers of Dr. Raveh that deserves acknowledgment, even belatedly. References 1. Alaywan M , Sindou M : Fronto-temporal approach with orbito-zygomatic removal. Surgical anatomy. Acta Neurochir 104 : 79 – 83 , 1990 Alaywan M, Sindou M: Fronto-temporal approach with orbito-zygomatic removal. Surgical anatomy. Acta Neurochir 104: 79–83, 1990 2. Al-Mefty O : The supraorbital-pterional approach to skull base lesions. Neurosurgery 21 : 474

Restricted access

Roberto Delfini, Antonino Raco, Marco Aritco, Maurizio Salvati and Pasquale Ciappetta

complications related to the surgical technique are negligible. Reconstruction leaves no unsightly marks and, most important, the exposure is excellent. References 1. Al-Mefty O : Supraorbital-pterional approach to skull base lesions. Neurosurgery 21 : 474 – 477 , 1987 Al-Mefty O: Supraorbital-pterional approach to skull base lesions. Neurosurgery 21: 474–477, 1987 2. Benedict WL : Surgical treatment of tumors and cysts of the orbit: eleventh de Schweinitz lecture. Am J Ophthalmol 32 : 763 – 773