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Eric Arnaud, Dominique Renier and Daniel Marchac

S caphocephaly, or premature closure of the sagittal suture, is rarely associated with increased intracranial pressure (ICP) or mental retardation, as are most of the single craniosynostoses. 13–15 For the past decade, surgery has been performed on scaphocephalies for both functional and morphological reasons. Because of the tremendous decrease in the mortality and morbidity associated with modern craniofacial surgery techniques, remodeling of the scaphocephalic skull can be performed early in infancy in almost all cases, with minimal risks. The indication for

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10.3171/jns.2005.102.2.0253.0001 Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Deepak Agrawal , M.Ch. Paul Steinbok , M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S. (C) D. Douglas Cochrane , M.D., F.R.C.S.(C) British Columbia's Children's Hospital of the Children's and Women's Health Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 253 254 Object Scaphocephaly is a common craniofacial abnormality that results from craniosynostosis of the sagittal suture. The authors have treated a group of

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Deepak Agrawal , M.Ch. Paul Steinbok , M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S. (C) D. Douglas Cochrane , M.D., F.R.C.S.(C) British Columbia's Children's Hospital of the Children's and Women's Health Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 253 254 Object. Scaphocephaly is a common craniofacial abnormality that results from craniosynostosis of the sagittal suture. The authors have treated a group of infants who presented with nonsynostotic

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Herbert S. Bell, Frank B. Clare and Alan F. Wentworth

, there are very few documented cases of familial or hereditary craniosynostosis. It is the purpose of this paper to present two families with hereditary scaphocephaly, and to request other authors to add to the literature by bringing to light other instances and other varieties of the familial form of this disorder. In 1926, Greig 3 suggested that hereditary examples are restricted, since those slightly afflicted do not seek medical advice and those grossly affected are not acceptable in marriage. Since then, Duguid, 2 in 1929, reported familial scaphocephaly in 4

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James E. Baumgartner, Kelly Seymour-Dempsey, John F. Teichgraeber, James J. Xia, Amy L. Waller and Jaime Gateno

S caphocephaly is a common craniofacial abnormality that results from craniosynostosis of the sagittal suture. There are children, however, who present with nonsynostotic scaphocephaly, so-called sticky sagittal suture. These children exhibit the same abnormal head growth as those with sagittal synostosis, although CT scanning demonstrates a patent sagittal suture. They have no history of prematurity or lateral head positioning. Moreover, if the cranial deformity in these patients is left untreated, it progresses to the same clinical manifestation of sagittal

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Sagittal synostectomy

Technical note

Joan L. Venes and Martin P. Sayers

with interrupted Tevdek suture. Bulky or occlusive dressings are avoided. Postoperatively hematocrit is followed closely for the first 72 hours, but otherwise no special care is needed. Subgaleal effusions often occur, but have not been a problem and the infant is discharged 5 to 7 days postoperatively. Discussion It is generally accepted that scaphocephaly does not significantly alter brain growth and consequently the single indication for operative correction is cosmetic improvement. Any procedure designed to achieve this goal must, therefore, be

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Roger J. Hudgins, Fernando D. Burstein and William R. Boydston

colleagues 4 studied the families of children with sagittal synostosis and described a high incidence of anger and anxiety among those parents who elected no surgical correction for their child. Two marriages have “foundered” because of disputes regarding the child's deformity and lack of treatment. Nine of the 34 untreated children have been teased about their deformity and, in four cases, the child could no longer cope with the school environment. Our society places great significance on physical appearance and the importance of correction of the scaphocephaly deformity

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Christopher M. Bonfield, D. Douglas Cochrane, Ash Singhal and Paul Steinbok

postoperative helmeting are being used with reports of good cosmetic outcomes with decreased morbidity, shortened hospital stay, and less blood loss and transfusion. 1–3 , 5 , 8 The surgery is typically performed through 2 small (2–4 cm) skin incisions, one posterior to the anterior fontanelle and another anterior to the lambda ( Fig. 1 ). 2 For ease and safety of the operation, it is imperative that these incisions be placed correctly. Due to the scaphocephaly and the often deformed and pointed occipital region, the lambda is often hard to palpate through the skin. The

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Elizabeth Lajeunie, Darach William Crimmins, Eric Arnaud and Dominique Renier

C raniosynostosis (or craniostenosis) is a birth defect defined as premature closure of the skull sutures. There are two types that involve the midline sutures: scaphocephaly (sagittal synostosis) and trigonocephaly (metopic synostosis). The most common form of craniosynostosis, scaphocephaly, causes anteroposterior elongation of the skull. Trigonocephaly is characterized by a triangular appearance of the forehead and by hypotelorism. Frontal skull x-ray films demonstrate orbital hypotelorism and a high position of the medial portions of the orbital roofs

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Victoria Kuta, P. Daniel McNeely, Simon Walling and Michael Bezuhly

sutures. 25 , 46 Although the disorder’s impact on neurocognitive development remains in question, children with sagittal craniosynostosis may be faced with social and psychological barriers that negatively impact their self-esteem and social function because of their scaphocephalic appearance. 31 , 41 Although reports have documented the psychosocial aspects of scaphocephaly, no study to date has quantified the perceived burden of sagittal craniosynostosis and scaphocephaly by using standardized methods of obtaining health utility scores. Utility scores such as the