Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 51 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

S. A. Skillicorn and Richard W. Garrity

The numerous eponyms and terms that have resulted from the study of sarcoidosis over the years reflect the protean clinical manifestations of this disease entity. Historical reviews 14, 22 reveal that in 1875 the first clinical report of a case was made by Hutchinson. In 1889 Besnier designated the skin changes “lupus pernio.” Boeck (1899) described the histologic features of the cutaneous lesions and introduced the term “sarcoid.” Heerfordt (1909) reported the uveoparotid fever syndrome, which later became identified as a manifestation of sarcoidosis

Restricted access

.1955.12.4.0403 Intracranial Boeck's Sarcoid Tumor Resembling Meningioma S. A. Skillicorn Richard W. Garrity July 1955 12 4 407 413 10.3171/jns.1955.12.4.0407 Arteriovenous Malformation of the Head of the Caudate Nucleus. Report of a Case with Total Removal Charles A. Carton William C. Hickey July 1955 12 4 414 418 10.3171/jns.1955.12.4.0414 Ossifying Chronic Subdural Hematoma. Report of a Case B. Griponissiotis July 1955 12 4 419 420 10.3171/jns.1955.12.4.0419 Congenital Spinal Extradural Cyst. Case Report and Review of

Restricted access

Harold R. Keegan and Sean Mullan

  Colloid cyst of 3rd ventricle 2   Neurinoma of 9th nerve 1   Pituitary adenoma 1   Craniopharyngioma 1   Tumor of 3rd ventricle (unclassified) 1 Miscellenous conditions   Intracranial hematoma 4   Cerebral abscess 2   Cerebral cyst (unclassified) 2   Cyst of 4th ventricle 1   Subdural empyema 1   Subdural hematoma 1   Extradural hematoma 1   Sarcoid (mass in 3rd ventricle) 1     Total 100 In 20 patients air failed to enter the ventricular

Restricted access

Timir Banerjee and William E. Hunt

chronic progressive form usually shows a negative Kveim reaction (sarcoid antigen skin test). In the remittent form there is involvement usually of multiple systems, and the associated neurological signs may be a part of the syndrome. In the chronic progressive form, if it selectively involves the nervous system, biopsy almost always is necessary for diagnosis of the disease. The Kveim test was not performed in our case. In 1905, Winkler 16 first reported the manifestation of this disease in the nervous system. Among 20 cases of sarcoidosis at autopsy, Askanazy 1

Restricted access

Emil Lee Weber

0 1  plasmacytoma 1 1 0 0 0 1 Cysts and hematomas:  colloid cyst 1 0 0 0 0 0  intracerebral hematoma 1 0 0 0 0 0  cyst of septum pellucidum 1 0 0 0 0 0  subdural hematoma 1 1 0 1 0 0  cyst of velum interpositum 1 1 0 1 0 1 Infections:  brain abscess 5 5 2 2 1 5  tuberculoma 2 2 0 1 0 2  sarcoid granuloma 2 2 0 0 0 2 Miscellaneous:  epidermoid

Restricted access

Howard Semins, G. Robert Nugent and Samuel M. Chou

perivascular cuffing and a dense astrocytosis between the granulomatous foci. Fig. 2. Photomicrographs of sarcoid granulomas of the spinal cord showing Langhans giant cells and perivascular lymphocytic infiltration. Left: H & E, × 100. Right: H & E, × 400. Postoperative Course The chest films remained negative for pulmonary disease, and further sputum specimens failed to grow any mycobacterium. A PPD done on the 10th postoperative day was negative at 24, 48, and 72 hours. Bladder and bowel incontinence persisted with predominately left

Restricted access

Robert Snyder, Javad Towfighi and Nicholas K. Gonatas

4 observed a patient with sarcoid disease who developed signs of a low cervical cord lesion. Moldover 10 reported a case of a 24-year-old man with widespread sarcoidosis and clinical evidence of spinal cord involvement. This patient was relieved of his symptoms by steroid therapy. None of these reports, however, included histological confirmation. Cases of spinal cord sarcoidosis verified by biopsy or autopsy are very rare. Longcope 8 included in a table of distribution of lesions one case of cervical cord sarcoidosis found at autopsy, but no further

Restricted access

by ectopic pinealoma in a girl with precocious puberty Osami Kubo Naomi Yamasaki Yasuo Kamijo Keiichi Amano Koichi Kitamura Reiko Demura July 1977 47 1 101 105 10.3171/jns.1977.47.1.0101 Preoperative diagnosis of brain-stem abscess by computerized tomography with survival Albert V. Messina Laurence J. Guido Arie L. Liebeskind July 1977 47 1 106 108 10.3171/jns.1977.47.1.0106 Sarcoid of the cauda equina James N. Campbell Perry Black Peter T. Ostrow July 1977 47 1 109 112 10.3171/jns.1977.47.1.0109 Anomalous course of the recurrent motor branch of

Restricted access

James N. Campbell, Perry Black and Peter T. Ostrow

C linically apparent involvement of the nervous system is estimated to occur in about 5% of all patients with sarcoid. 3, 8, 13, 14 When sarcoid affects the nervous system, the affected tissues are usually the meninges at the base of the brain and the cranial nerves, while the spinal cord is only rarely involved. In the infrequently reported cases with cord involvement, the presumptive diagnosis has generally been based on clinical grounds or proven at autopsy. 1, 4–7, 9–11, 14 In a few instances, however, the diagnosis was confirmed during life through

Restricted access

Michael Schaefer, Claude Lapras, Guenther Thomalske, Holger Grau and Ralf Schober

comparable case from our department. This patient was a young woman with sarcoid granulomas in the right temporal lobe. After operation in that case, there has also been no recurrence of the intracranial tumor nor any other organ manifestation of sarcoidosis. The prognosis of these isolated central nervous system granulomas appears favorable when totally removed. We feel that a direct surgical approach is justified even in cases of difficult access like the pineal region. Acknowledgment We are indebted to Professor W. Krücke for his diagnostic evaluation