Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 5,896 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

will memorialize a great soldier, a great surgeon, and a great gentleman. Harvey Cushing was all of these and more. Military men admired him because he exemplified all that is noble in the service. He insisted on seeing the First World War from the front lines, activated not by any quest for glory, but by his desire to fulfill his Hippocratic oath with complete disregard for his own safety and comfort. He served with a Harvard ambulance unit in France in 1915 before the United States entered the war. Realizing that American participation was inevitable, he returned

Restricted access

Franc D. Ingraham, Orville T. Bailey and Frank E. Nulsen

the safety of the material and to compare its behavior with that of other hemostatic agents in neurosurgery, especially muscle. THROMBIN IN THE SUBARACHNOID SPACE In the application of fibrin foam soaked in thrombin solution to various parts of the central nervous system, it is probable that at times an excess of thrombin solution enters the subarachnoid space and from thence it may be disseminated by the cerebrospinal fluid. The concentration of thrombin thus circulated would of necessity be small unless the foam were applied with gross carelessness. It

Restricted access

Edgar F. Fincher, Bronson S. Ray, Harold J. Stewart, Edgar F. Fincher, T. C. Erickson, L. W. Paul, Franc D. Ingraham, Orville T. Bailey, Frank E. Nulsen, James W. Watts, Walter Freeman, C. G. de Gutiérrez-Mahoney, Frank Turnbull, Carl F. List, William J. German, A. Earl Walker, J. Grafton Love, Francis C. Grant, I. M. Tarlov, Thomas I. Hoen and Rupert B. Raney

neurosurgery. In addition, as the armed forces contract for fibrin foam and thrombin, neurosurgeons will be asked to collaborate in controlling the effectiveness and safety of the fibrin foam and thrombin submitted by testing each preparation in the operating room. As all will agree, the services must have prior claim on what material can be produced at this time. Dr. Joseph P. Evans : Is there danger that fibrin foam inserted into an opening in a large venous sinus might produce a propagating clot in the lumen of the vessel? Dr. Franc D. Ingraham : In one instance, we

Restricted access

W. K. Livingston, E. W. Davis and K. E. Livingston

safety, be based solely on the presence or absence of a fusiform neuroma. Denny-Brown's percussion experiments 5 demonstrated that a nerve so injured tends to form a “pseudo-neuroma” at the site, which may persist for as long as twelve weeks. This pseudo-neuroma might be indistinguishable from a true neuroma except by microscopic examination. Yet it does not appear to represent any permanent obstacle to regeneration. In fact, the degree of recovery in his experimental animals tended to approximate the normal, even in cases in which the pseudo-neuroma persisted for

Restricted access

Robert S. Dow, George Ulett and John Raaf

86 of the series of 213 patients. Fig. 1. Headband electrode holder. A history was elicited when the patient was brought to the First Aid Station or hospital. Opinions of the patient, witnesses of the accident, ambulance men, safety inspectors, and attending physicians were recorded and evaluated in an attempt to obtain an accurate account of the accident. The scene of the accident was visited in almost all instances by one of us (G.U.) and an attempt made to evaluate the physical factors responsible for the injury. When the patient had been struck

Restricted access

Richard Upjohn Light

–674. 30. Horsley , V. Remarks on ten consecutive cases of operations upon the brain and cranial cavity to illustrate the details and safety of the method employed. Brit. med. J. , 1887 , 1 : 863 – 865 . Horsley , V. Remarks on ten consecutive cases of operations upon the brain and cranial cavity to illustrate the details and safety of the method employed. Brit. med. J. , 1887, 1: 863–865. 31. Horsley , V. Antiseptic wax. Brit. med. J. , 1892 , 1 : 1165 . See also: University of London. Report to to

Restricted access

Richard U. Light

problem handicapped by an interdiction against free transfer of animal evidence into human conclusions, and by a wide personal choice of values ranging from the scientifically absolute to the clinically tolerable. In this paper I shall do no more than to marshall the available evidence, add a new sampling, and reach an obviously temporary opinion. The question of the safety of animal thrombin, however, is of the moment: the cancellation in large part of the production of serum albumin resulted unavoidably in reduction of the by-products from which up to now human

Restricted access

R. Rabinovitch

wore spruce little holsters on their belts. The pistol butts could not be mistaken for syringes. They took their front row places, and all waited in silence. Tall, erect, white-haired Clovis Vincent walked into the room. Dressed in a white laboratory coat fastened by safety pins, the open collar showing the top of his favorite turtle-necked pullover, the Professor asked that the first patient be brought in. Clovis Vincent leans over the stretcher, lifts away the sheets and presents his first case: This is a child about 4 years old, name and identity unknown

Restricted access

Donald D. Matson and Julius Wolkin

sufficiently to carry this out with safety. Such an exploratory burr hole is easily made under local anesthesia either before (Cases 3 and 4) or after (Cases 1 and 2) debridement of the wound of entrance and adds very little to the length or shock of the operative procedure. In cases in which the clinical picture of cerebral compression is out of proportion to the extent of the visible brain wound, this exploration for a distant hematoma is especially recommended before attacking the wound of entrance. Brief reports of cases illustrating this type of injury are presented

Restricted access

David F. James and Spencer Braden

, not comparable to the relaxing effect on the spastic muscles. We were thus enabled to achieve an appreciable decrease in spasticity and maintain a comfortable margin of safety in dosage. This margin was increased by the fact that we could attain as satisfactory relaxation of spasticity with moderate doses (0.070 to 0.100 grams). Larger doses (up to 0.140 grams) had a very annoying paralyzing action on normally innervated muscles but produced no greater degree of relaxation on spastic muscles. Interval between Doses . The available literature does not mention the