Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 367 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

L. W. Freeman, J. MacDougall, C. C. Turbes and D. E. Bowman

correlated rather directly with the functional status. DISCUSSION As was indicated in the introduction, the purpose of these experiments was to explore the possibility of reversing the usual unfavorable trend of lesions of the spinal cord. It is clear that the functional results are distinctly positive. The possibility of influencing functional regeneration is definitely seen. Trypsin was chosen as a logical agent for trial because of its fibrinolytic qualities. However, in view of the hypotensive properties shown by this protease when injected intravenously, the

Restricted access

S. Mullan and J. Dawley

coagulation disorders in pregnancy. Clin. Obstet. Gynec. , 1964 , 7 : 372 – 389 . Beller , F. K. Treatment of coagulation disorders in pregnancy. Clin. Obstet. Gynec. , 1964, 7: 372–389. 3. Beller , F. K. , Epstein , M. D. , and Kaller , H. Distribution, half life time and placental transfer of the protease inhibitor trasylol. Thromb. Diath. Haemorrh. , 1966 , 16 : 302 – 310 . Beller , F. K., Epstein , M. D., and Kaller , H. Distribution, half life time and placental transfer of the protease inhibitor trasylol

Restricted access

Cerebral Arterial Spasm

Part 3: Partial Purification and Characterization of a Spasmogenic Substance in Feline Platelets

John Kapp, M. S. Mahaley Jr. and Guy L. Odom

subarachnoid hemorrhage . Fields, W. S., and Sahs, A. L., Eds., Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, 1965, 518 pp. (See pp. 70–84.) 5. Hagihara , B. Bacterial and mold proteases. In: The enzymes. Boyer , P. D. , Lardy , H. , and Myrbäck , K. , Eds., New York : Academic Press , 5 vols , 1960 . (See vol . 4 , 2nd ed. , pp. 193 – 213 .) Hagihara , B. Bacterial and mold proteases. In: The enzymes . Boyer, P. D., Lardy, H., and Myrbäck, K., Eds., New York: Academic Press, 5 vols, 1960. (See vol. 4, 2nd ed., pp

Restricted access

Russel H. Patterson Jr. and Peter Harpel

as the release of proteases from polymorphonuclear leukocytes that infiltrate the thrombus are among the current speculations. Mullan and Dawley 4 proposed that EACA acid might inhibit the activation of the fibrinolytic enzyme system and thereby stabilize the thrombus, which would reduce the incidence of recurrent hemorrhage. They administered the drug to 35 patients and identified a recurrent hemorrhage in just two, which suggests that the effects of the drug were beneficial. Norlén and Thulin 6 have reported similar results in patients receiving either EACA

Restricted access

Patrick F. Golden and John A. Jane

volume is defined as the total amount of blood removed to bring the pressure to the desired level, and thus in the calculation of percent uptake represents the maximum volume removed.) The failure of a protease enzyme inhibitor (Trasylol) to protect the gut from the lesions of enteritis has been previously discussed. 4 Excess lactate levels were also significant. All animals of both experimental and control groups therefore satisfied the usual criteria for hemorrhagic shock. The uptake of bled volume in animals with the clamp, however, was at a significantly lowered

Restricted access

Clark Watts, Robert Knighton and George Roulhac

Macnab I, McCullough JA, Weiner DS, et al: Chemonucleolysis. Can J Surg 14: 280–288, 1971 21. McCluskey RT , Thomas L : The removal of cartilage matrix in vivo by papain. Identification of crystalline papain protease as the cause of the phenomenon. J Exp Med 108 : 371 – 383 , 1958 McCluskey RT, Thomas L: The removal of cartilage matrix in vivo by papain. Identification of crystalline papain protease as the cause of the phenomenon. J Exp Med 108: 371–383, 1958 22. Mitchell PEG , Hendry

Restricted access

W. Eugene Stern and Walter F. Coulson

mucopolysaccharidase enzymes facilitate the spread of the collagenase? If the aim is to eliminate the predominantly mucopolysaccharide nucleus pulposus, would a simple mucopolysaccharidase without a protease be sufficient? The interpretations offered in this study must be considered tentative and the speculations only conjectural. Acknowledgments The authors acknowledge the participation of Dr. Theodore G. Obenchain in the performance of the second-stage operative procedures of the Protocol B animals. References 1. Bornstein P : Comparative

Restricted access

Immunobiology of primary intracranial tumors

Part 1: Studies of the cellular and humoral general immune competence of brain-tumor patients

M. Stephen Mahaley Jr., William H. Brooks, Thomas L. Roszman, Darell D. Bigner, Lynn Dudka and Sheila Richardson

meningiomas, usually totally resected at surgery and not otherwise treated postoperatively, did not show any striking elevation in skin-test responses or lymphocyte counts during serial tests, although their values all along were generally closest to normal. Future studies will concentrate on attempts to effect positively immune reactions in glioma patients. In a group of patients being treated with Protease I (Brinase), Thornes 20 has reported one glioma patient who converted skin-test DHR's from negative to positive within 1 week, with a duration of conversion of 26

Restricted access

Athanasios Smokovitis and Tage Astrup

mounted with glycerin-jelly. A total of 100 to 120 serially cut sections from each specimen was prepared and examined. To test for unspecific protease activity, fibrin slides were also prepared with plasminogen-free fibrinogen. Inhibitor Effect The presence of inhibitors of plasmin was examined by the fibrin slide “sandwich” technique of Noordhoek Hegt and Brakman 12, 13 as follows. Frozen sections (16 µ thick) were collected as above and covered by a plasminogen-free fibrin film by spreading and mixing 100 µl of a 0.7% solution of plasminogen-free bovine

Restricted access

Michael T. Smith, John P. Wissinger, Carol Grace Smith and Howard W. Huntington

(lumbo-sacral spina bifida cystica) in a five millimeter (Horizon XIV) human embryo. Anat Rec 152: 9–16, 1965 8. Lucy JA , Dingle JT , Fell HB : Studies on the mode or action of excess vitamin A. 2. A possible role of intracellular proteases in the degradation of cartilage matrix. Biochem J 79 : 500 – 508 , 1961 Lucy JA, Dingle JT, Fell HB: Studies on the mode or action of excess vitamin A. 2. A possible role of intracellular proteases in the degradation of cartilage matrix. Biochem J 79: 500–508, 1961 9