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The Torkildsen Procedure

A Report of 19 Cases

Edgar F. Fincher, Gordon J. Strewler and Homer S. Swanson

, although substantially extirpated, netted no operative evidence of a release of the ventricular obstruction and a lateral ventricle fluid shunt was effected. An autopsy 24 hours later changed our appraisal of what had been considered a primary brain tumor to a diagnosis of a metastatic neurogenic sarcoma from the cecum. There were present five multicentric areas of sarcoma in this intestine and a second brain metastatic growth within the postparietal lobe opposite the cavity into which the cerebral end of the catheter had been inserted. In Case 15, moribund on hospital

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Harvey Gass and William P. Van Wagenen

We wish to chronicle the present record of two tumors in the same patient, a meningioma and an oligodendroglioma, not only on account of their co-existence but because of the striking feature of their juxtaposition in the same hemisphere. The literature on multiple primary brain tumors has been brought up to date in three recent reports. 1, 3, 4 Ours is the seventh recorded case of glioma and meningioma in co-existence. In none of the previously reported cases was there a combination of oligodendroglioma and meningioma. Although in Feiring and Davidoff

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Dwight Parkinson, Winchell Mck. Craig and James W. Kernohan

hence they would extend beyond this small, fairly silent lobe before data were secured in any reports for statistics. The 275 cases in which the occipital lobe was involved by tumor represent a much higher percentage of the total brain tumors than the percentage of the supratentorial brain which is occupied by the occipital lobe. Thus, it is felt that the occipital lobe is probably involved by tumor as often as any other region of equal volume in the cerebrum. Because of its small size, however, it is rarely the exclusive site of a primary brain tumor. The types

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Tore Patrick Störtebecker

given. Frequency of Brain Metastasis . The problems of metastatic lesions in the brain have been referred to by many authors. Opinions regarding the frequency of brain metastasis differ widely. Statistical analyses of large general autopsy materials have been published (Krasting, 16 Rau, 19 Rudershausen, 20 Gutting 14 ). The relation of brain metastasis to the total number of intracranial tumors was estimated by Rudershausen 20 to be 18 per cent and by Gutting 14 to be 25 per cent. In a total of 28,831 autopsies Gutting found 243 primary brain tumors and 85

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J. D. French, P. M. West, F. K. von Amerongen and H. W. Magoun

results of 4 injections of HN 2 into the carotid artery in 3 patients are summarized in Table 2 . The improvement in patient A.B. with metastasis from bronchogenic carcinoma was highly gratifying after the first injection. This improvement, however, lasted only 5 weeks, and a second injection resulted in a fatality. Little transient improvement resulted in patient G.H. who had a primary brain tumor (malignant oligodendroglioma). Patient E.H., with multiple metastases in the brain from a bronchogenic carcinoma, died of acute cerebral edema 15 hours after injection

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Tore Patrick Störtebecker

cure (1 of our patients with hypernephroma is still alive 17 years postoperatively 29 ). According to Cushing, 7 in cases with a long latency to onset of cerebral symptoms, we may question if the symptoms are caused by a primary brain tumor and not by a metastatic lesion. Meagher and Eisenhardt, 24 and Oldberg 25 described cases in which a primary body growth had been removed, and in which at intracranial operation the suspected brain metastasis proved to be a meningioma. SURVIVAL PERIODS The common point of view with regard to the neurosurgical

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Leonard T. Kurland

Incidence and average annual incidence rates for newly diagnosed intracranial and intraspinal neoplasms in Rochester, Minnesota, resident population, 1945 to 1954, inclusive, by age Age Group 1950 Population Primary Brain Tumor, Certain and Probable Intraspinal * and Intracranial Metastasis Primary Intraspinal Neoplasm Pituitary Total No. Rate † No. Rate † No. Rate † No. Rate † No. Rate † 0–24 11,391 3 2.6 0 0 1 0.9 1 0.9 5 4.4 25–44 8,899 7 7.9 3 3

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D. M. Perese, A. Slepian and G. Nigogosyan

Spontaneous dissemination of primary spinal cord tumors is extremely rare 1 in comparison with primary brain tumors metastasizing along the neural axis 4, 5, 7, 9–11, 13 as well as to other organs. 3, 5, 8, 14 Postoperative spread of spinal cord tumors is also uncommon. We have been able to find only two references of such a spread. Kernohan and Fletcher-Kernohan 2 reported 2 cases of ependymomas of the spinal cord which metastasized in the leptomeninges and to the muscles overlying the operative site in one patient, and up and down the subarachnoid space

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R. Glen Spurling

Winchell McKendree Craig was born in Washington Court House, Ohio, April 27, 1892, one of the six children (four brothers and a sister) of Eliza Orlena Pine Craig and Thomas Henry Craig. He died at St. Mary's Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota, with which he had been associated professionally for 31 years, February 12, 1960. By the same sort of unhappy coincidence so often observed in this and other medical specialties, this distinguished neurosurgeon died of a primary brain tumor, arising from the third ventricle and the hypothalamus and histologically

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D. M. Perese and G. E. Moore

in fowl (Jackson 40 ). In addition, considerable information can be gained from individual case reports of brain tumors in dogs by Dawes, 18 in cows by Fankhauser 21 and Barboni, 7 in fowl by Jackson 39, 40 and Belmonte, 9 in silver fox by Schlotthauer and Kernohan, 73 in white mice by Ngowyang, 58 and in monkeys by Sellheim. 75 These reports give the preponderance of brain tumors to horses, cows, and dogs. A short report by McGrath 51 indicates that the incidence of primary brain tumors is 1.46 per cent in a series of 3,410 necropsies in dogs. The