Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 448 items for :

  • "preoperative embolization" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ruben E. M. Hekster, Bartolomeo Matricali and Willem Luyendijk

D jindjian has demonstrated the value of preoperative embolization of tumors fed by branches of the external carotid artery. 1, 2 Since 1971, we have used the transfemoral catheter method to embolize feeding vessels of certain highly vascular tumors. 3, 4 In each case, no acceptable alternative method of treatment was available, which, in our opinion, justified the use of this still experimental procedure. Initially we used embolization only as an alternative to surgery. However, we now also use the procedure presurgically to control operative hemorrhage

Restricted access

Cordell E. Gross, Charles J. Hodge Jr., Eugene F. Binet and Irvin I. Kricheff

. Angiography should be performed prior to surgery in an attempt to distinguish those vessels feeding the tumor from those supplying the spinal cord. Those vessels supplying the tumor but not the spinal cord may be safely occluded either by preoperative embolization or ligation at surgery. This will reduce the risk of severe hemorrhage at the time of laminectomy. In 11 of 13 cases of extra-axial vascular lesions of the head, neck, and spine in which preoperative embolization was carried out, Hilal and Michelsen 4 found a significant reduction in blood loss at surgery. In

Restricted access

Bengt Nilsson Carl-Henrik Nordström August 1977 47 2 274 281 10.3171/jns.1977.47.2.0274 Resection of a vertebral hemangioma after preoperative embolization David C. Hemmy David M. McGee Frederick H. Armbrust Sanford J. Larson August 1977 47 2 282 285 10.3171/jns.1977.47.2.0282 Pneumocephalus secondary to cerebrobronchial fistula formed by a ventriculoatrial shunt James T. Stuntz Robert M. Shuman August 1977 47 2 286 289 10.3171/jns.1977.47.2.0286 The syndrome of acute central cervical spinal cord injury after a gunshot lesion Wolf I. Steudel William

Restricted access

David C. Hemmy, David M. McGee, Frederick H. Armbrust and Sanford J. Larson

M yelopathy secondary to a vertebral hemangioma has previously been treated by indirect approaches. Improvement in myelopathy has been reported following radiation therapy, laminectomy, selective embolization, and combinations of these methods. 3 These techniques, however, do not restore normal anatomic continuity of the spinal canal. We are describing the preoperative embolization of a vertebral hemangioma, which permitted resection of the tumor and correction of the anatomic deformity. Case Report A 52-year-old man was admitted to the hospital

Restricted access

Charles B. Wilson, Hoi Sang U and James Domingue

multiple small hematomas in the hemisphere that had harbored the AVM ( Fig. 4 ). An identical postoperative fatality occurred in the second case despite partial occlusion of the AVM by preoperative embolization. Subsequently, two malformations were excised successfully in two-stage operations: an initial craniotomy and clipping of all major arterial feeders was followed 7 to 10 days later by excision of the AVM. Immediately following the first stage, both patients developed major hemispheric deficits that cleared within a week; the subsequent excision of the

Restricted access

Miguel A. Faria Jr. and Alan S. Fleischer

the routine four vessels visualized in all cases of large cerebral AVM's. Magnification and subtraction techniques were performed routinely. Seven cases of giant AVM with a dual cerebral and meningeal supply were identified. All of these AVM's were located in the posterior temporal and parietal regions and received rapid blood flow. We did not include AVM's of the posterior fossa in this series. Six patients were treated surgically, and underwent preoperative embolization procedures in an attempt to decrease the vascularity of the lesion. Our embolization techniques

Restricted access

Joël Bonnal, André Thibaut, Jacques Brotchi and Jacques Born

vascularization was marked, and in Case 14 we carried out preoperative embolization of the feeding branches with strips of Gelfoam, thus affording easier removal of the mass and of the invaded bone without blood loss. Optic Nerve and Tract In many cases, the optic nerve and tract were shifted and compressed, but rarely embedded in the tumor. In two cases, the dural invasion spread to the jugum and the diaphragma sellae, and the ipsilateral optic nerve was embedded in the meningioma, which spread to the chiasm and to the contralateral optic nerve. Invasion of the

Restricted access

Robert P. Iacono, Michael L. J. Apuzzo, Richard L. Davis and Fong Y. Tsai

aspects and long-term prognosis of infratentorial intracranial tumours in infancy and childhood. Acta Neurol Scand 57: 31–52, 1978 14. Haymaker W , Rubinstein LJ , Miquel J : Brain tumors in irradiated monkeys. Acta Neuropathol 20 : 267 – 277 , 1972 Haymaker W, Rubinstein LJ, Miquel J: Brain tumors in irradiated monkeys. Acta Neuropathol 20: 267–277, 1972 15. Hieshima GB , Everhart FR , Mehringer CM , et al : Preoperative embolization of meningiomas. Surg Neurol 14 : 119

Restricted access

selective external carotid arteriography to visualize additional meningeal feeding vessels in cases of large posterior cerebral AVM's. Like Fardoun, et al. , we recommend that selective opacification of the internal and external carotid arteries be performed, to rule out the existence of AVM's with a dual meningeal and cerebral supply, not only in tentorial AVM's, but also in posterior fossa AVM's. Even though we found no benefit in preoperative embolization of large AVM's in our series, other authors have found this procedure a useful preoperative adjunct in the

Restricted access

Fumio Shima, Keiichi Mihara and Shoji Hachisuga

and blood clots. B: The left segmental artery of T-12 supplies the middle part of the angioma in the left paraspinal region. No nidus was shown in the spinal canal. B′: The angiomatous blush is reduced after embolization. Note disappearance of early venous filling of the external and internal vertebral plexuses. Operation . Eighteen days after the onset of symptoms, an exploratory laminectomy of T10–12 was performed with total removal of the angioma and hematoma in the epidural tissue. The paraspinal muscles appeared ischemic due to the preoperative