Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,074 items for :

  • "pediatrics" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Full access

Berksu Curebal, Nazan Dalgic, and Banu Bayraktar

, Martino A , Bernardi S , Bernaschi P , : Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in children . BMJ Case Rep 2011 : bcr0220113807 , 2011 10.1136/bcr.02.2011.3807 3 Emiroglu M , Alkan G , Turk Dagi H : Tigecycline therapy in an infant for ventriculoperitoneal shunt meningitis . Pediatrics 139 : e20160963 , 2017 10.1542/peds.2016-0963 4 Fang YQ , Zhan RC , Jia W , Zhang BQ , Wang JJ : A case report of intraventricular tigecycline therapy for intracranial infection with extremely drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

Restricted access

Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Timothy R. Smith, and Shenandoah Robinson

preoperative laboratory testing before pediatric neurosurgical operations? 2) What are the predictors of critical laboratory values in this patient population? 3) Can a predictive scale help identify which patients have the greatest odds of an abnormal laboratory value? Methods Data Source Data were extracted from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program–Pediatrics (NSQIP-P, 2012–2014) registry. NSQIP-P is a prospective registry, where trained surgical reviewers collect data on more than 150 predefined variables, and patients are

Full access

Benjamin J. Kuo, Joao Ricardo N. Vissoci, Joseph R. Egger, Emily R. Smith, Gerald A. Grant, Michael M. Haglund, and Henry E. Rice

College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) has created landmark transformations in the ability to reliably predict risk-adjusted postoperative complications for adults. 4 , 6 Based on its success in the Veterans Affairs system and the private sector 7 to provide surgical quality benchmarks and inform QI interventions, the ACS has partnered with the American Pediatric Surgical Association to create a similar database platform for the pediatric population, the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program–Pediatrics (NSQIP-Peds). 3

Restricted access

Raymond I. Haroun, Daniele Rigamonti, and Rafael J. Tamargo

. Involvement of the dominant hemisphere may result in an expressive aphasia. In the majority of patients, these deficits tend to resolve completely over weeks or months. Despite numerous reports in which the anatomical variations of this artery have been described, little has been written in the neurosurgical literature about the German physician who first described it. Academic Achievements In 1876, when Heubner was appointed director of the district outpatient clinic in Leipzig, his interest in pediatrics increased as a result of a disproportionate pediatric patient

Restricted access

Joseph H. Piatt Jr.

T he National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatrics (NSQIP-P; http://www.pediatric.acsnsqip.org/about.jsp ) is a prospective project organized by the American College of Surgeons in collaboration with the American Pediatric Surgical Association. 6 Participating hospitals employ dedicated medical record analysts who abstract randomly selected surgical charts for a large number of demographic and clinical variables. The NSQIP-P calculates rates of adverse events—such as surgical site infection, transfusion, or readmission within 30 days—for each

Restricted access

Travis R. Ladner, Ashly C. Westrick, John C. Wellons III, and Chevis N. Shannon

have been conducted to assess the reliability and generalizability of HRQOL instruments used in adult CM-I patients, 12 , 30 , 31 very few instruments appropriately evaluate the pediatric population. For this reason we have developed the Chiari Health Index for Pediatrics (CHIP), a multidomain 45-item instrument that provides a quantitative score in the domains of somatic complaints and psychosocial function. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a reliable and simple questionnaire for pediatric patients with CM-I as a quantitative indicator of HRQOL

Restricted access

Philipp R. Aldana and Paul Steinbok

P ediatricians play a vital role in the diagnosis, initial workup, and long-term treatment of children with neurosurgical diseases. Despite this, the opportunities to learn about the medical treatment of a pediatric neurosurgical patient during pediatrics residency training are limited and variable. There are no provisions for formal neurosurgical education, such as neurosurgical clinical rotations or teaching sessions, in the pediatrics residency training curriculum. 1 Outside of residency training, other avenues for neurosurgical education for the

Restricted access

Georgina E. Sellyn, Alan R. Tang, Shilin Zhao, Madeleine Sherburn, Rachel Pellegrino, Stephen R. Gannon, Bradley S. Guidry, Travis R. Ladner, John C. Wellons III, and Chevis N. Shannon

outcome instruments and lack of validated scales being used present a problem for assessing CM-I outcomes. 3 HRQOL outcomes are important to study with CM-I, as the disorder can be debilitating and greatly affect patient HRQOL. 4 Thus, Ladner et al. 5 assessed general pediatric HRQOL instruments and found them to be less than optimal in effectively measuring HRQOL in the CM-I patient population. Therefore, in 2013 their group designed and validated the Chiari Health Index for Pediatrics (CHIP), a questionnaire that specifically measures and assesses HRQOL in

Full access

Carlito Lagman, Vera Ong, Lawrance K. Chung, Lekaa Elhajjmoussa, Christina Fong, Anthony C. Wang, Quinton Gopen, and Isaac Yang

of the National Institute for Health Research (CRD42017058160). Institutional review board approval was not required for this study. Consent for publication of details of the illustrative case was obtained from the patient’s parents. Data Sources Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane, and Embase databases were independently searched by the first (C.L.) and second (V.O.) authors through January 2017, using a strategic combination of search terms: “pediatrics,” “children,” “canal,” and “dehiscence.” Items were filtered by language (English), text availability

Restricted access

Joseph H. Piatt Jr.

The Section on Neurological Surgery (SONS) of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) occupies a distinct position in neurosurgical politics: it is not a clinical or a scientific organization but, rather, a service organization. Unlike its sister organizations, the Joint Section on Pediatric Neurological Surgery of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the American Society of Pediatric Neurosurgeons, the SONS does not hold an annual meeting and neurosurgeons are not the immediate beneficiaries of its