Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 667 items for :

  • "patient-reported outcome" x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Restricted access

Seokchun Lim, Hsueh-han Yeh, Mohamed Macki, Sameah Haider, Travis Hamilton, Tarek R. Mansour, Edvin Telemi, Lonni Schultz, David R. Nerenz, Jason M. Schwalb, Muwaffak Abdulhak, Paul Park, Ilyas Aleem, Richard Easton, Jad G. Khalil, Miguelangelo Perez-Cruet, and Victor Chang

opioid abuse, there continues to exist considerable variability in prescribing patterns for elective surgical procedures. 20 This issue is further exacerbated in spine surgery, as many patients have chronic pain, and a significant number of patients are already on a regimen of daily opiates prior to surgery. 21 The goal of this study was to investigate how variations in postoperative opioid prescription dosage after elective spine surgery can influence outcomes. We hypothesized that increased opioid prescription is associated with poor patient-reported outcomes

Free access

Adham M. Khalafallah, Maureen Rakovec, Katemanee Burapachaisri, Shirley Fung, Sharon L. Kozachik, Benita Valappil, Hussam Abou-Al-Shaar, Eric W. Wang, Carl H. Snyderman, Georgios A. Zenonos, Paul A. Gardner, Mustafa K. Baskaya, David Dornbos III, Garret Choby, Edward C. Kuan, Christopher Roxbury, Jonathan B. Overdevest, David A. Gudis, Victoria S. Lee, Joshua M. Levy, Andrew Thamboo, Rodney J. Schlosser, Judy Huang, Chetan Bettegowda, Nyall R. London Jr., Nicholas R. Rowan, Albert W. Wu, and Debraj Mukherjee

that have previously been used in this patient population to evaluate postoperative QOL include generic, approach-specific, or site-specific surveys. 16–18 However, generic patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments may overlook conditions relevant to a specific diagnosis and be less sensitive to QOL changes over time. 19 We address this gap by developing a novel instrument, Suprasellar Meningioma Patient-Reported Outcome Survey (SMPRO), that captures common disease- and approach-specific PROs for use in patients who have undergone resection of suprasellar

Restricted access

Ibrahim Hussain, Ori Barzilai, Anne S. Reiner, Lily McLaughlin, Natalie M. DiStefano, Shahiba Ogilvie, Anne L. Versteeg, Charles G. Fisher, Mark H. Bilsky, and Ilya Laufer

“indeterminate” group (SINS 10–12) respond differently to surgery compared to patients with lower SINS in the “indeterminate” group (SINS 7–9). Methods Patient Selection Patients who underwent first-time instrumented fusion for metastatic spine disease were consecutively enrolled between July 2014 and August 2016. Patients without preoperative patient-reported outcome (PRO) data (including emergency cases) and those whose postoperative PRO data were collected less than 14 days or more than 180 days after surgery were excluded. Otherwise, no patients meeting inclusion criteria

Full access

Aditya Vedantam, Daniel Hansen, Valentina Briceño, Alison Brayton, and Andrew Jea

current health care environment have led to an increased focus on value-based interventions and quantifying patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after surgery. A recent review of the literature, however, revealed that few studies have reported such outcome measures for pediatric neurosurgical patients, even though the use of PROs and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes for other pediatric conditions is increasing. 10 To the best of our knowledge, the use of PRO and HRQOL tools has not been previously undertaken for pediatric patients undergoing surgery for

Free access

Philippe Beauchamp-Chalifour, Alana M. Flexman, John T. Street, Charles G. Fisher, Tamir Ailon, Marcel F. Dvorak, Brian K. Kwon, Scott J. Paquette, Nicolas Dea, and Raphaële Charest-Morin

Interestingly, a recent retrospective cohort study of the adult spinal deformity population suggested that frail patients also experienced worse baseline health-related quality of life but were more likely to achieve a greater substantial clinical benefit in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) (SF-36 and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]) than nonfrail patients. 7 The role of frailty in nondeformity spinal conditions has not been defined, including whether there is a relationship between frailty and PROs after spine surgery for common degenerative conditions in elderly patients

Free access

Philippe Beauchamp-Chalifour, Alana M. Flexman, John T. Street, Charles G. Fisher, Tamir Ailon, Marcel F. Dvorak, Brian K. Kwon, Scott J. Paquette, Nicolas Dea, and Raphaële Charest-Morin

Interestingly, a recent retrospective cohort study of the adult spinal deformity population suggested that frail patients also experienced worse baseline health-related quality of life but were more likely to achieve a greater substantial clinical benefit in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) (SF-36 and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]) than nonfrail patients. 7 The role of frailty in nondeformity spinal conditions has not been defined, including whether there is a relationship between frailty and PROs after spine surgery for common degenerative conditions in elderly patients

Restricted access

Brittany E. Haws, Benjamin Khechen, Mundeep S. Bawa, Dil V. Patel, Harmeet S. Bawa, Daniel D. Bohl, Adam B. Wiggins, Kaitlyn L. Cardinal, Jordan A. Guntin, and Kern Singh

T he evaluation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following surgery continues to be a prevalent topic in the spine literature. In spine surgery several PRO instruments have been validated to measure different aspects of health status including pain, disability, physical function, and mental health. 11 , 40 , 41 Referred to as legacy measures, these instruments allow for evaluation of a patient’s perception of their health status. However, these measurement tools do not come without limitations. Often, legacy measures are not validated across a variety of

Restricted access

Jawad M. Khalifeh, Christopher F. Dibble, Ammar H. Hawasli, and Wilson Z. Ray

intervention. 6 , 12 , 28 The assessment of outcomes in spine care is facilitated by multiple patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments. 6 , 12 “Legacy” PRO measures include global health status measures (e.g., the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36] for quality of life), pain instruments (e.g., visual analog scale [VAS] for pain intensity), and disease-specific functional status questionnaires (e.g., Neck Disability Index [NDI] for cervical spine disorders and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] for low-back pain). 6 , 12 , 23 , 26 Legacy PRO measures are widely

Free access

James P. Wondra II, Michael P. Kelly, Elizabeth L. Yanik, Jacob K. Greenberg, Justin S. Smith, Shay Bess, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Lawrence G. Lenke, and Keith Bridwell

, expensive, and risks life-threatening complications. 10–14 Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are patient-focused tools that are essential in both shared decision-making and the evaluation of success in a value-driven healthcare economy. 15–20 To date, few studies have examined the relationship between preoperative and postoperative PROMs in ASD. 21 , 22 Specifically, no study has used the baseline PROM to provide expected outcomes or improvements to patients after surgery. PROM change is often evaluated relative to established minimum clinically important

Free access

Joel A. Finkelstein and Carolyn E. Schwartz

I nnovation and technology have had a profound influence on our everyday lives, as well as on our health-related quality of life (QOL) through advances in medical and surgical treatments. Measurement of spine surgery outcomes has undergone an evolution. Millennial and postmillennial surgeons came into the field inheriting an established practice of collecting patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), often referred to as “legacy” measures. In the pre-PROM era, outcomes from surgery were evaluated without the patient’s perspective and, hence, they lacked