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Paraplegia following thoracolumbar sympathectomy

Case report

Ronald F. Shallat and Thomas E. Klump

.5.418 7. Mosberg WH Jr , Voris HO , Duffy J : Paraplegia as a complication of sympathectomy for hypertension. Ann Surg 139 : 330 – 334 , 1954 Mosberg WH Jr, Voris HO, Duffy J: Paraplegia as a complication of sympathectomy for hypertension. Ann Surg 139: 330–334, 1954 10.1097/00000658-195403000-00010 8. Nathan PW : Reference of sensation at the spinal level. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiat 19 : 88 – 100 , 1956 Nathan PW: Reference of sensation at the spinal level. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiat 19

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Extradural spinal depositions of urates producing paraplegia

Case report

John Litvak and Walter Briney

granulomatous foci with central amphophilic material, and multinucleated giant cell reaction, and a slight histiocytic proliferation ( Fig. 2 ). Fig. 2. Needle-shaped urate crystals are seen surrounded by a granulomatous infiltrate containing foreign body giant cells. H & E, X 400. Postoperatively the patient regained sufficient leg function to permit walking with a cane. References 1. Koskoff YD , Morris LE , Lubic LG : Paraplegia as a complication of gout. JAMA 152 : 37 – 38 , 1953 Koskoff YD, Morris LE

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Paraplegia due to extramedullary hematopoiesis in thalassemia

Case report

Kirpal S. Mann, Chung P. Yue, Kwan H. Chan, Lily T. Ma, and Henry Ngan

complete regression of the spinal compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis. On the basis of this experience, it is recommended that spinal compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis may be treated by partial excision and hypertransfusion therapy. Radiation therapy should be reserved only for those patients who fail to respond to the above regimen; particularly because irradiation itself may produce pancytopenia 9 which can further aggravate the disease. References 1. Abbassioun K , Amir-Jamshidi A : Curable paraplegia due to

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Traumatic arachnoidal diverticulum associated with paraplegia

Case report

Edward P. Hoffman, John T. Garner, David Johnson, and C. Hunter Shelden

A n intraspinal cystic meningeal diverticulum due to avulsion injury of the brachial plexus has been previously reported. We are reporting here a unique situation in which a traumatic arachnoidal diverticulum was responsible for the delayed onset of paraplegia. Case Report This 12-year-old boy was hospitalized on September 3, 1970, for paraplegia and progressive truncal weakness. At the age of six he was unconscious for several months following an auto accident. Subsequent to that time he had had speech impairment and weakness of his left arm. Five years

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Postoperative paraplegia with preserved intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials

Case report

Howard H. Ginsburg, Andrew G. Shetter, and Peter A. Raudzens

I ntraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP's) have been used increasingly in recent years to monitor neurological function during scoliosis surgery and other high-risk spinal operations. 1, 2, 7, 14 Numerous cases have been reported in which early recognition of SSEP latency and amplitude changes appeared to have prevented permanent neurological deficits by alerting the surgeon to the need for appropriate corrective action. 3–5, 8, 13, 15, 18, 19 We report a case of postoperative paraplegia that occurred despite preserved intraoperative SSEP

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Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with paraplegia following lumbar puncture

Case report

Guus Koerts, Vincent Vanthuyne, Maxime Delavallee, Herbert Rooijakkers, and Christian Raftopoulos

P atients with SDAVFs may develop congestive myelopathy with progressive paraparesis, urinary disturbances, and gait ataxia. 3 , 14 , 16 , 23 These symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical differential diagnosis with polyneuropathy, demyelinating disease, and intramedullary tumor is difficult. 4 , 9 , 15 We present a patient initially treated at another institution who was suspected of having an intramedullary process and who developed an acute paraplegia after an LP. Her MRI study disclosed an SDAVF without hemorrhage. Fortunately the patient

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Spinal cord tethering after traumatic paraplegia with late neurological deterioration

Thorir S. Ragnarsson, Quentin J. Durward, and Richard E. Nordgren

association between posttraumatic cord tethering and late progressive posttraumatic myelopathy has, to our knowledge, not been described previously. Case Report This 49-year-old right-handed man was referred to the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center because of progressive cervical myelopathy. Thirty years before, he had suffered a T5–6 fracture dislocation with complete T-5 paraplegia. He gave a 10-year history of increasing numbness and weakness of his hands and forearms, and of neck and shoulder pain increased by neck movements but not by Valsalva maneuvers. Four

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Spinal subarachnoid hematoma after lumbar puncture causing reversible paraplegia in acute leukemia

Case report

Joan Bladé, Félix Gastón, Emili Montserrat, Pedro Marín, Albert Grañena, Agustí Bachs, and Ciril Rozman

H emorrhage into the spinal canal can be a complication of lumbar puncture. 2 The spinal subdural and epidural spaces are well recognized sites in which hematomas may appear, producing compressive myeloradiculopathy. However, a subarachnoid hematoma after lumbar puncture is exceedingly rare, even in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders. 3, 5–7 We report the case of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and thrombocytopenia who developed paraplegia following a lumbar puncture. The patient recovered after an emergency laminectomy

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Paraplegia due to posttraumatic pelvic arteriovenous fistula treated by surgery and embolization

Case report

Daniel N. Weingrad, John L. Doppman, Paul B. Chretien, and Giovanni Di Chiro

A rteriovenous malformations (AVM's) of the spinal cord produce neurological symptoms by diverting or “stealing” blood from the spinal cord, by compressing the cord with dilated arterial and venous channels, or by producing chronic venous hypertension in the cord. 1, 8, 12 Neurological dysfunction resulting from extra-spinal arteriovenous fistulas is rare. 5 In this case report of progressive paraplegia resulting from a longstanding acquired extra-spinal arteriovenous fistula, we describe a combined surgical-embolic approach to a difficult management

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An incomplete paraplegia following the dislocation of an artificial cervical total disc replacement

Case report

Lennart Viezens, Christian Schaefer, Jörg Beyerlein, Roland Thietje, and Nils Hansen-Algenstaedt

presented here demonstrates that new complications can occur with this method. In the English-language literature we could not find reports of paraplegia after CTDR due to implant dislocation after surgery; only cases of direct postoperative aggravation of neurological deficits are reported, none of them due to the implants. 3 , 4 Case Report History and Examination This 53-year-old patient with neck pain that had been present for approximately 2 months and a radiating pain into the left shoulder was examined in our outpatient clinic. In the clinical