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Stephen C. Saris, Sandra H. Bigner and Darell D. Bigner

tissue culture before transplantation into nude Sprague-Dawley mice (nu/nu genotype, BALB/c background). * Tumors used for experiments were obtained from nude mouse passage levels 13 to 18. The mice were maintained as described previously. 6 Fourteen to 21 days after subcutaneous inoculation, the mice were killed by cervical dislocation, and their tumors removed under sterile conditions. Tumor fragments were minced with dissecting scissors, and passed through a modified tissue press with a bilayered 40/60 mesh cytosieve. This was mixed with Richter's improved zinc

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Toshiki Yamasaki, Hajime Handa, Junkoh Yamashita, Yoshihiko Watanabe, Masaaki Taguchi, Shigeki Kuwata, Yuziro Namba and Masao Hanaoka

cells without mitogen and tumor antigen. ‡ Little additional increase in the IFN production was observed with TCGF after stimulation with mitogen and tumor antigen. Discussion It is assumed that TCGF and gamma IFN, being lymphokines produced by T lymphocytes, play important roles in various immunological phenomena. T cell growth factor has been demonstrated to 1) enhance the proliferative response of thymocytes; 2) support the continuous growth of factor-dependent CTL's; 3) enhance the anti-sheep erythrocyte plaque-forming responses of nude-mouse

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Raymond Sawaya, Thaddeus Mandybur, Illona Ormsby and John M. Tew Jr.

specific inhibitor of plasminogen activator. 23 Like other protease inhibitors, EACA has been used in various animal models to evaluate their effect on the growth of a variety of malignant tumors. 1–3, 6, 7, 10, 13, 17, 18, 22, 28 In several studies, a definite antitumoral activity was associated with antifibrinolytic therapy. 1, 7, 13, 17, 22, 28 For this experiment, we selected the nude mouse model because of the ease with which brain tumors can be grown and measured subcutaneously, and because of the documented similarities of human tumors grown in mice, as

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Jeffrey J. Olson, David W. Beck, Janet A. Schlechte and Pao-Min Loh

This technique offers a physiological milieu for the long-term maintenance of tumor cell lines. Nevertheless, the physiological and immunological parameters present in the subcutaneous tissue of a nude mouse are quite different from those in the human cranial vault. The effects on hormone-binding proteins, tumor growth rate, and physiological response to hormonal manipulation in mice may not parallel the tumor response in humans, and these results must be interpreted in light of these factors. Although these are preliminary data, our findings justify a larger in

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Andrew H. Kaye, George Morstyn and Michael L. J. Apuzzo

number of animals required to obtain statistically significant data. There have been difficulties in developing an accurate mouse glioma model. Although the nude mouse model has been established for the study of glioma 60 it has disadvantages: as an immunosuppressed animal, it is not entirely representative of the clinical situation and there are difficulties in housing and handling these mice. An ependymoblastoma tumor has been used as an implantable intracerebral tumor model in normal mice, 5 but this is a rare tumor in humans. 34 We have found that the C6 rat

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Hoi Sang U, Patricia Y. Kelley, James D. Hatton and Jin Y. Shew

Lan-5. 24 The SKN-C cells were a subpopulation of the SN-SH neuroblastoma cells. The retinoblastoma cell line Y-79 was examined together with two primary retinoblastomas (SD RB-1 and SD RB-2), both obtained at UCSD. The neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, and glioblastoma cell lines were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection. Anchorage Dependence of Glioblastoma Cell Growth The anchorage dependence of glioblastoma cell growth, the best in vitro correlate to tumorigenesis in the nude mouse, was determined in the soft agar assay. 5 This assay is a

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Azedine Medhkour, Melinda Van Roey, Raymond A. Sobel, Howard J. Fingert, Jungkyo Lee and Robert L. Martuza

can be studied is needed. This report is of our initial studies of the growth and histological characteristics of human meningiomas derived from surgical specimens and tissue cultures implanted into the subrenal capsule of the nude mouse. Materials and Methods Preparation from Surgical Specimen Human meningiomas were obtained at surgery. After the initial diagnosis of meningioma by frozen section evaluation, further specimens were submitted for routine pathological studies. The remainder was divided into three portions; one was frozen at −80°C for hormonal

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the nude mouse Azedine Medhkour Melinda Van Roey Raymond A. Sobel Howard J. Fingert Jungkyo Lee Robert L. Martuza October 1989 71 4 545 550 10.3171/jns.1989.71.4.0545 Effect of nordihydroguaiaretic acid on cultured rat and human glioma cell proliferation Diana E. Wilson Anthony DiGianfilippo Frank G. Ondrey Kenning M. Anderson Jules E. Harris October 1989 71 4 551 557 10.3171/jns.1989.71.4.0551 Relaxant effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide on cerebral arterial spasm induced by

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M. Stephen Mahaley Jr., Edward J. Dropcho, Linda Bertsch, Tammy Tirey and G. Yancey Gillespie

: 503–508, 1985 (Jpn) 15. Nakamura O , Teramoto A , Yamamoto H , et al : [ Effect of human fibroblast interferon on malignant brain tumors. ] No To Shinkei 35 : 905 – 911 , 1983 (Jpn) Nakamura O, Teramoto A, Yamamoto H, et al: [Effect of human fibroblast interferon on malignant brain tumors.] No To Shinkei 35: 905–911, 1983 (Jpn) 16. Nobuhara M , Kanamori T , Ashida Y , et al : [ Basic study of interferon- β . Part IV. Antitumor effect on nude mouse-transplanted human tumors

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Walter A. Hall, Marsha J. Merrill, Stuart Walbridge and Richard J. Youle

neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) was grown from cells in tissue culture * in the flank of an athymic nude mouse (nu/nu genotype, National Institutes of Health). The animal was sacrificed and the tumor was placed on dry ice with storage at −70°C. Transferrin Preparation Human transferrin † was saturated with iron by the following method. 25 Six mg of transferrin was dissolved in 1 ml of 0.25 M Tris-Cl (pH 8.0)/10 mM NaHCO 3 . Next, 20 µ l of 100 mM disodium nitrilotriacetate/12.5 mM FeCl 3 was then added to the transferrin solution, which was incubated for 30 minutes at