Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 259 items for :

  • "neural tube defect" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Genya Odake, Tarumi Yamaki and Shoji Naruse

meningomyelocele is one of them, and its etiology is not well understood. According to Matson, 9 the basic causes include failure of vertebral fusion or neural groove, local herniation, and abnormal proliferative overgrowth of neural elements in the embryo. We think that the association of meningomyelocele and neurenteric cyst must be explained by a single event. Patten 11 stated that overgrowth of the neural plate in the early stages of its development might be a factor in the genesis of meningomyelocele. This overgrowth was induced by a neural tube defect that was

Restricted access

Ken Winston, Parker Mickle and Samuel Schuster

M ost open neural tube defects of the spine are amenable to closure by simple proven techniques. 2, 3 Large skin defects are often considered impossible to close primarily with full-thickness skin and are either managed with open techniques using split-thickness skin grafts, 4 or with rotation of skin flaps. 1, 5 These techniques require prolonged hospitalization and result in extensive cosmetic deformity. This is a report of a premature infant with thoracolumbar rachischisis in whom a new method of management resulted in rapid closure of a large skin

Restricted access

David C. McCullough and Lynn A. Balzer-Martin

hydrocephalus. N Engl J Med 304: 1021–1023, 1981 2. Bottcher J , Jacobsen S , Gyldensted C , et al : Intellectual development and brain size in 13 shunted hydrocephalic children. Neuropaediatrie 9 : 369 – 377 , 1978 Bottcher J, Jacobsen S, Gyldensted C, et al: Intellectual development and brain size in 13 shunted hydrocephalic children. Neuropaediatrie 9: 369–377, 1978 3. Campbell S , Thoms A : The use of ultrasound in the antenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects. Birth Defects 13 ( 3D

Restricted access

David D. Cochrane and S. Terence Myles

technique by Campbell 6 and colleagues in the early 1970's. Amniotic fluid analysis for the diagnosis of neural tube defects became available in the mid-1970's. Currently, these techniques, when combined with fetoscopy and intrauterine CT scanning in selected cases, allow reliable prenatal diagnosis of a variety of conditions. 6, 8, 12, 16 On the basis of this capability, prenatal treatment decisions can be made. The anatomy of the fetal cranium is well within the reach of currently available B-mode ultrasound units. Scanning in the transverse plane can outline the

Restricted access

Todd L. Helle, John W. Hanbery and Dennis H. Becker

patients was generally poor. Only one patient was cured of the tumor. Two patients who were alive at the time of the reports had evidence of metastatic disease. The remaining six patients died from either metastatic disease or infection 2 to 15 months after diagnosis of their tumor. None of the patients had repair of the congenital defect prior to the discovery of their tumor. Seven of nine tumors were associated with some form of chronic irritation to the neural tube defect, either mechanical in nature or from a persistently draining fistula. Of these seven cases, five

Restricted access

William C. Hanigan, Jack Gibson, Nicholas J. Kleopoulos, Thomas Cusack, George Zwicky and Robert M. Wright

showed that the majority of these infants had associated anomalies of the central nervous system. Pretorius, et al. , 17 reported on 40 cases of fetal hydrocephalus. Ultrasonography failed to reveal neural tube defects in three of 12 positive cases, and ancillary CT imaging was used in five patients; however, the diagnostic specificity of ultrasonography was not mentioned. Other investigators have described in single case reports the use of CT scanning as a primary means of diagnosis or as an aid in the planning of obstetrical management. 2, 11, 15, 16 Magnetic

Restricted access

Robert A. Brodner, Ronald S. Markowitz and Howard J. Lantner

principles. Neurosurgery 14 : 553 – 556 , 1984 Brodner RA, Markowitz RS: Feasibility of intracranial surgery in the rat fetus: model and surgical principles. Neurosurgery 14: 553–556, 1984 3. Campbell S : Early prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects by ultrasound. Clin Obstet Gynecol 20 : 251 – 359 , 1977 Campbell S: Early prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects by ultrasound. Clin Obstet Gynecol 20: 351–359, 1977 4. Caritis SN , Edelstone DI , Mueller-Heubach E : Pharmacologic

Restricted access

Shizuo Oi, Hideyoshi Saya and Satoshi Matsumoto

the neural tube, while myeloschisis is the product of a rupture at the lower end. These ruptures would occur during the 2nd or 3rd month of intrauterine life. Morgagni, 19 Padget, 23 and McLone (DG McLone, personal communication) supported the hypothesis that overdistention of the neural tube can lead to rupture of the distal end and the formation of secondary neural tube defects. Browne 2 proposed a theory of fetal compression in utero as the cause of late development of myeloschisis. Politzer 25 suggested that cord defects observed in embryos might be

Restricted access

Subtorcular occipital encephaloceles

Anatomical considerations relevant to operative management

Paul H. Chapman, Brooke Swearingen and Verne S. Caviness

vaginal delivery, possibly with rupture of the sac or serious brain-stem compression. References 1. Campbell LR , Dayton DH , Sohal GS : Neural tube defects: a review of human and animal studies on the etiology of neural tube defects. Teratology 34 : 171 – 187 , 1986 Campbell LR, Dayton DH, Sohal GS: Neural tube defects: a review of human and animal studies on the etiology of neural tube defects. Teratology 34: 171–187, 1986 2. Caviness VS Jr , Evrard P : Occipital encephalocele. A

Restricted access

Shizuo Oi, Takashi Kokunai, Yasuhiro Okuda, Matsuto Sasaki and Satoshi Matsumoto

Mutagen 8: 377–391, 1988 6. Finnell RH , Moon SP , Abbott LC , et al : Strain differences in heat-induced neural tube defect in mice. Teratology 33 : 247 – 252 , 1986 Finnell RH, Moon SP, Abbott LC, et al: Strain differences in heat-induced neural tube defect in mice. Teratology 33: 247–252, 1986 7. Gardner WJ : The Dysraphic State: From Syringomyelia to Anencephaly. Amsterdam : Excerpta Medica , 1973 , pp 1 – 201 Gardner WJ: The Dysraphic State: From Syringomyelia to Anencephaly