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William R. Steffey May 1976 44 5 608 612 10.3171/jns.1976.44.5.0608 Spinal arterial malformation in a child with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Glen S. Merry D. Barry Appleton May 1976 44 5 613 616 10.3171/jns.1976.44.5.0613 Parietal intradiploic encephalocele Edward J. Kosnik John N. Meagher Lowell R. Quenemoen May 1976 44 5 617 619 10.3171/jns.1976.44.5.0617 Moyamoya disease as a cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage in a Negro patient Robert P. Meriwether Hugh G. Barnett II Dean H. Echols May 1976 44 5 620 622 10.3171/jns.1976

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Robert P. Meriwether, Hugh G. Barnett II and Dean H. Echols

N umerous reports during the last 15 years have described a syndrome of bilateral intracranial internal carotid artery occlusion associated with extensive intracranial collateral circulation. This was first described in detail in 1961 by Takeuchi; 7 in 1969 it was given the name “moyamoya,” meaning “puff of smoke,” by Suzuki and Takaku. 6 This term describes the angiographic appearance of the collateral arterial network that is characteristic of the disease. Moyamoya disease was first recognized in Japanese people, 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 but as noted by Lee and

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.3171/jns.1978.48.4.0560 Moyamoya disease associated with aneurysm Namio Kodama Jiro Suzuki April 1978 48 4 565 569 10.3171/jns.1978.48.4.0565 Aphasia and left thalamic hemorrhage Arden F. Reynolds Jr. A. Basil Harris George A. Ojemann Paul T. Turner April 1978 48 4 570 574 10.3171/jns.1978.48.4.0570 Cerebellar hemorrhage in adults John R. Little David E. Tubman Roméo Ethier April 1978 48 4 575 579 10.3171/jns.1978.48.4.0575 Variations in response of human brain tumors to BCNU in vitro Paul L

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Namio Kodama and Jiro Suzuki

T here have been few reported cases of moyamoya disease, 3–5, 7–10 and fewer still associated with aneurysms. 2, 5, 6 Up to now, we have experienced five such cases; in three patients the aneurysms arose from the posterior choroidal artery, and in two from the basilar artery. Based on these five cases, we discuss the formation process of these aneurysms and their symptomatic occurrence in moyamoya disease. Case Reports Case 1 This 16-year-old girl suddenly commenced vomiting on December 24, 1968, followed by loss of consciousness. On admission, the

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.3171/jns.1978.48.6.1015 Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematomas Frederick D. Brown Sean Mullan Eugene E. Duda June 1978 48 6 1019 1022 10.3171/jns.1978.48.6.1019 Complications following intraspinal injections of steroids John H. Dougherty Jr. Richard A. R. Fraser June 1978 48 6 1023 1025 10.3171/jns.1978.48.6.1023 Moyamoya syndrome as a complication of radiation therapy Antti Servo Matti Puranen June 1978 48 6 1026 1029 10.3171/jns.1978.48.6.1026 Death following external carotid artery embolization for a

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Antti Servo and Matti Puranen

T he etiology of the disease of multiple progressive intracranial arterial occlusion, also known as the moyamoya syndrome, is unclear. A congenital etiology has been suggested, 5, 6, 9, 18 but acquired forms have also been shown to exist. 1, 10, 11, 19, 20, 23 In the neurocutaneous syndromes of children, radiographic features similar to those in moyamoya are found. 14 Intracranial arterial occlusive disease in combination with neurofibromatosis has previously been reported in 14 cases. 21 Nine of these had the moyamoya appearance, and three of the nine

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Koreaki Mori, Fuji Takeuchi, Masatsune Ishikawa, Hajime Handa, Mitsuo Toyama and Tarumi Yamaki

hormonal replacement on July 16, 1977. Discussion From a review of over 30 cases, including those we have experienced and the cases reported in the literature, we have come to the conclusion that cerebrovascular “moyamoya” disease 22 is not a specific disease entity, but a neuroradiological syndrome caused by an occlusion of the circle of Willis, and may result from a variety of causes. 6 An abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain (moyamoya) apparently results from an occlusion of the circle of Willis; it is made up of highly developed

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tomography Mark L. Rosenblum Julian T. Hoff David Norman Philip R. Weinstein Lawrence Pitts November 1978 49 5 658 668 10.3171/jns.1978.49.5.0658 Microsurgical relationships of the superior cerebellar artery and the trigeminal nerve David G. Hardy Albert L. Rhoton Jr. November 1978 49 5 669 678 10.3171/jns.1978.49.5.0669 Treatment of moyamoya disease with STA-MCA anastomosis Jun Karasawa Haruhiko Kikuchi Seiji Furuse Junichiro Kawamura Toshisuke Sakaki November 1978 49 5 679 688 10

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Jun Karasawa, Haruhiko Kikuchi, Seiji Furuse, Junichiro Kawamura and Toshisuke Sakaki

M oyamoya disease is a rare chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease with distinct angiographic features. These include 1) either marked stenosis or complete occlusion of the distal internal carotid arteries (ICA's); 2) poorly visualized anterior cerebral and middle cerebral arteries (MCA's) at their proximal portions; and 3) well developed fine vascular networks at the base of the brain (basal “moyamoya”). By definition, these changes should be present bilaterally, if not symmetrically. The posterior circulation is not primarily involved, but the posterior

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Takashi Yoshimoto, Keita Uchida and Jiro Suzuki

other aneurysms 19 15   sclerotic 11 9   traumatic 3 3   mycotic 1 0   anomalous 2 1   giant cell arteritis 1 1 aneurysms complicated  with other CVD 18 13   moyamoya 5 1   AVM 10 9   HICH 3 3    total 1116 1027 * Abbreviations: CVD = cerebrovascular disease; AVM = arteriovenous malformation; HICH = hypertensive intracerebral hematoma. TABLE 2 Distribution of intracranial saccular aneurysms Sites * Total