Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,259 items for :

  • "lumbar disc" x
Clear All
Restricted access

J. Grafton Love

intradural neurofibroma, removal of which resulted in relief. Fig. 5. Postero-anterior roentgenogram after subarachnoid injection of pantopaque, revealing a defect in the column of pantopaque at the third lumbar interspace due to protrusion of the third lumbar disk, which produced sciatic pain. The patient who has a tumor of the spinal cord ordinarily gives a history of insidious onset of pain that gradually progressed, without intermittency, until he became more or less incapacitated by it. The physical findings frequently are scant but the

Restricted access

Edgar F. Fincher, Bronson S. Ray, Harold J. Stewart, Edgar F. Fincher, T. C. Erickson, L. W. Paul, Franc D. Ingraham, Orville T. Bailey, Frank E. Nulsen, James W. Watts, Walter Freeman, C. G. de Gutiérrez-Mahoney, Frank Turnbull, Carl F. List, William J. German, A. Earl Walker, J. Grafton Love, Francis C. Grant, I. M. Tarlov, Thomas I. Hoen and Rupert B. Raney

after operation there was an average elevation to 50, 70 or sometimes 150 mg. per 100 cc. Usually such a reaction subsides within 76 hours. In spinal fluid examined two years after injection of lipiodol, we feel that the value for total protein is reliable and is not due to the lipiodol. The answer to Dr. Semmes' question is yes. The first case in this series was that of an old man with paraplegia, all five of whose lumbar discs had undergone protrusion and who had a tumor in addition. Recently I removed a neurofibroma from a woman a few months after a protruded

Restricted access

William G. Peacher and Robert C. L. Robertson

level of the lesion. Dandy, 11 for example, states that in the presence of a diminished or absent ankle jerk the lesion in most cases will be found at lumbar 5. Discs at lumbar 4 rarely cause alteration in the Achilles reflex according to Echols. 13 Craig and Walsh 10 have shown in a series of 449 lumbar discs that the ankle jerk was altered in 68 per cent at lumbar 5, 37 per cent at lumbar 4 and 52 per cent at lumbar 3. The patellar reflex was diminished to absent in 49 per cent of the cases at lumbar 3, 20 per cent at lumbar 4 and 9 per cent at lumbar 5. Sensory

Restricted access

Benjamin B. Whitcomb and George M. Wyatt

disc herniations. Brit. J. Radiol. , 1944 , 17 : 343 – 348 . Eaglesham , D. C. Observations on opaque myelography of lumbar disc herniations. Brit. J. Radiol. , 1944, 17: 343–348. 4. Haggart , G. E. , Albers , J. H. , and Zintl , W. J. The introduction and removal of lipiodol for spinogram studies. Surg. Clin. N. Amer. , June 1942 , 22 : 857 – 864 . Haggart , G. E., Albers , J. H., and Zintl , W. J. The introduction and removal of lipiodol for spinogram studies. Surg. Clin. N. Amer. , June 1942

Restricted access

J. Jay Keegan

herniation is at the same stage as that of herniation of a lower lumbar disc ten years ago when the diagnosis of sciatic neuritis was in vogue, with many hypothetical explanations of its cause, now discarded. The cervical spine and the lumbar spine are similar in their mobility, with frequent forward-bending strain placed upon them and occasional fracture or dislocation in these regions from violent force. In the lumbar region heavy weight bearing on a poor mechanical angle with the sacrum is the most important factor in causation of posterolateral herniation of the

Restricted access

Spinal Nerve Injury in Dorso-Lateral Protrusions of Lumbar Disks K. Lindblom Bror Rexed September 1948 5 5 413 432 10.3171/jns.1948.5.5.0413 Tumors of the Septum Pellucidum John D. French Paul C. Bucy September 1948 5 5 433 449 10.3171/jns.1948.5.5.0433 Clinical Experiences with Nerve Grafting G. af Björkesten September 1948 5 5 450 463 10.3171/jns.1948.5.5.0450 Curare in Spastic Paraplegia Irving S. Cooper Thomas I. Hoen September 1948 5 5 464 465 10.3171/jns.1948.5.5.0464 The Acute Effects on the

Restricted access

K. Lindblom and Bror Rexed

T he fact that in some cases of sciatica there are no signs of disk herniation at myelography and operative inspection of the spinal canal, prompted Lindblom 4 to make an anatomic study of the incidence of lumbar disk degenerations on cadavers. The specimens were taken from 160 patients of 14 to 87 years of age, regardless of clinical symptoms and cause of death. Among these, 60 nerve compressions were found, most of them by dorso-lateral protrusions against the lateral part of the intervertebral canal, where the nerves with their ganglions cross the

Restricted access

R. Glen Spurling and Everett G. Grantham

patients whose occupations are known fell into this group. The housewives, who comprised 20 per cent of the patients, constituted another group whose work requires a great deal of activity even if it cannot properly be termed heavy. In 5 of the 378 cases there were two ruptured discs, the ruptures in each instance occurring in the 4th and 5th lumbar discs. Negative Explorations In the long-term group of cases, in which operation was carried out before 1942, there were 28 negative explorations. In the short-term group, in which operation was carried out after 1945

Restricted access

Dean H. Echols and Frederick C. Rehfeldt

operation of a ruptured disk. Of the 151 cases, 34 were discarded as being equivocal herniations, non-disk lesions or negative explorations. The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of these 34 cases. The 151 cases comprised all the private patients suspected of having a ruptured lumbar disk who had primary intraspinal explorations during the 5-year period ending December 31, 1944. The only patients excluded from this study were those who had had previous spinal operations elsewhere. All the operations were performed by one of us (D. H. E). In the combined

Restricted access

Aidan A. Raney, R. B. Raney and C. R. Hunter

. Headache may be regarded as the “lumbago” of cervical disc lesions, corresponding to “lumbago” of the low back which usually precedes the radicular symptoms of lumbar disc herniation. 34, 36 More recently Jackson, 13 in her report on 200 patients with cervical spine lesions causing shoulder disability, states that in 100 patients headache was one of the principal symptoms and 35 per cent had roentgenographic evidence of ruptured cervical disc. Development or exacerbation of symptoms of disc origin commonly results from trauma, even though the trauma is slight