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Paul C. Bucy and Ben W. Lichtenstein

Left 0 Biceps Rt. ++ Left + Pathological Hoffmann Rt. +++ Left + Babinski Rt. 0 Left 0 Spinal puncture performed on Nov. 17, 1943 revealed a complete subarachnoidal block, the initial fluid pressure being 40 mm. of fluid. The cerebrospinal fluid was clear, colorless, and contained only one cell per c. mm. The Pandy and Wassermann reactions were negative and the total protein was 40 mg. per cent. Because of the spinal block, diagnoses of syringobulbia and of intramedullary tumor at the level of the foramen

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James L. Pool and Oscar A. Turner

Differential diagnosis, according to most writers on the subject of intramedullary cord neoplasms, constitutes an acknowledged difficulty. For example, Lichtenstein 3 speaks of remissions reminiscent of multiple sclerosis, and emphasizes the fact that multiple intramedullary tumors of the cord sometimes occur, making diagnosis still more difficult. The present case report illustrates many of the features common to reports in the literature; e.g. (1) the difficulty of diagnosis, illustrated by the fact that conversion hysteria, pernicious anemia and amyotrophic lateral

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Olan R. Hyndman and William F. Gerber

-standing, usually benign and probably congenital lesion. This would limit the diagnostic possibilities considerably. It would not be impossible for the syndrome to be simulated in all of its features by syringomyelia. Kyphoscoliosis is commonly associated with syringomyelia. It is also conceivable that local enlargement of the spinal canal could be caused by a slow expansion of the spinal cord due to an intramedullary accumulation of fluid, although we have never encountered such a case. Intramedullary tumors may rarely grow to such large proportions and slowly enough to

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Mason Trupp and Ernest Sachs

. Probably intramedullary tumor.” Operation . Laminectomy from D10 to L1. No tumor was found. There were numerous enlarged vessels over the conus ( Fig. 7 ). Nothing was done; closure as usual. He made an uneventful recovery, without improvement. Fig. 7. Case 16. Showing a very early stage of an angiomatous lesion. Diagnosis: Telangiectasis of the cord. Case 17 . J.M., male, aged 27 (B.H. No. 57764). Referred by Dr. J. F. Reilly, Vincennes, Indiana. Admitted Oct. 23, 1936, complaining of progressive difficulty in vision during past 7 years. His

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John R. Russell and Paul C. Bucy

51 cases of intramedullary spinal cord tumor operated upon at the Mayo Clinic and found 2 (4 per cent) oligodendrogliomas. Up to Jan. 1, 1939, the Mayo Clinic series included 64 intramedullary tumors, 3 of which were oligodendrogliomas, an incidence of 5 per cent. 9 The same group 7 reported 25 gliomas of the conus medullaris and filum terminale, of which 1 was an oligodendroglioma. In 1944 Woods and Pimenta 11 made a study of 30 histologically verified spinal cord gliomas, and classified 1 as an oligodendroglioma. Oljenick 8 has also reported 1 case, giving a

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Paul C. Bucy and H. R. Oberhill

a late development of syphilis, but is rarely seen now. Formerly it was considered the process to be ruled out first and foremost in any case of suspected space-occupying lesion of the central nervous system. It is only a part of a more generalized disease process but may be the only manifestation thereof even to the extent of negative serological tests. Nonne 10 (1913) stated, “In general, one can think of the possibility of a gumma whenever the symptoms of an extra- or intramedullary tumor are present.” Today the rare occurrence of a gumma in the spinal cord or

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Rafael Castillo and Edgar A. Kahn

lamina. A mass of grayish-black scar tissue lay in the cord substance in the midline. It seemed fairly well encapsulated and was part of the sinus tract. It was firm in consistency. The cord substance around it, however, seemed softened and was yellow. This mass lay exactly like a small midline intramedullary tumor, and measured 0.8 by 2.0 cm. It was completely removed ( Fig. 2 ). It could now be established that the knife had entered the spinal cord in the midline and had completely pierced it and had reached the anterior part of the vertebral canal where it was

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Paul F. A. Hoefer and Sidney M. Cohen

.................. 2 Paget's disease......................................... 1 Osteoid osteoma....................................... 1 Sarcoma.............................................. 3 Multiple melanomata................................... 1 Metastatic carcinoma................................... 7 Dermoid cyst.......................................... 2 Myelomalacia.......................................... 2 Intramedullary tumor................................... 9 Intramedullary angioma

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Nils Antoni

Berücksichtigung der quantitativen mikromorphologischen Verhältnisse. Acta path. microbiol. scand. , 1944, suppl. 53, x, 276 pp. 6. Haberfeld , W. Zur Histologie des Hinterlappens der Hypophyse. Anat. Anz. , 1909 , 35 : 98 – 104 . Haberfeld , W. Zur Histologie des Hinterlappens der Hypophyse. Anat. Anz. , 1909, 35: 98–104. 7. Kernohan , J. W. , Woltman , H. W. , and Adson , A. W. Intramedullary tumors of the spinal cord. A review of fifty-one cases, with an attempt at histologie classification. Arch

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Tokuso Taniguchi and Joseph A. Mufson

12th thoracic vertebrae was carried out. Upon opening the dura, a fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was found at the level of the 11th thoracic vertebra ( Fig. 1 ). This swelling was produced by a well circumscribed, lobulated, intramedullary tumor, measuring approximately 3×2 cm., which had a distinct yellow color. The cord in this area was almost entirely replaced by the tumor, with only a small amount of neural tissue present anteriorly and laterally. The pia-arachnoid covered the posterior surface of the tumor. While the tumor appeared to be well