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Histologic Studies of the Brain Following Head Trauma

IV. Late Changes: Atrophic Sclerosis of the White Matter

Joseph P. Evans and I. Mark Scheinker

. Histologic studies of the brain following head trauma. I. Post-traumatic cerebral edema. (To be published) . Evans , J. P., and Scheinker , I. M. Histologic studies of the brain following head trauma. I. Post-traumatic cerebral edema. (To be published). 5. Evans , J. P. , and Scheinker , I. M. Histologic studies of the brain following head trauma. II. Post-traumatic petechial and massive intracerebral hemorrhages. (To be published) Evans , J. P., and Scheinker , I. M. Histologic studies of the brain following head trauma. II. Post

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Walter G. Haynes

under a normal social behavior. Some inhibitions were lost, on occasion, but the defect was not incapacitating. Complete bilateral loss of the frontal lobes, however, reduced the individual to a vegetative state. Extensive occipital lobe damage did not share this favorable outlook. This may have been due to the proximity of the midbrain and the wave of force reaching vital centers. On two occasions, swift resection of a macerated occipital lobe and evacuation of a large intracerebral hemorrhage, proved life saving. This was probably due to relief of pressure

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Intracranial Angiography

I. The Diagnosis of Vascular Lesions

Carl F. List and Fred J. Hodges

aneurysm if a covered perforation is present that is walled off by thickened leptomeninges (false aneurysm). As a rule intradural aneurysms remain clinically silent until they rupture or develop a slight leakage with resulting subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. A larger clot in the vicinity of the bleeding aneurysm can often be recognized on arteriograms by characteristic displacement of the arteries of the neighborhood. While spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage is frequently caused by a ruptured aneurysm, in not every such case should the patient be subjected

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Histologic Studies of the Brain Following Head Trauma

II. Post-traumatic Petechial and Massive Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Joseph P. Evans and I. Mark Scheinker

, particularly in the immediate vicinity of the hemorrhages ( Fig. 5 ). Loyez stains of the myelin sheaths showed numerous focal areas of myelin loss in the vicinity of the congested veins. In addition there were numerous small foci of tissue necrosis, just as are seen in anemic infarction. There was no glial reaction, nor was there proliferation of phagocytes. Case 2. A 66-year-old male. Fall from second-story window. Severe head and chest injuries. Coma. Death in three days. Necropsy. Massive and petechial intracerebral hemorrhage . History . J. M., a 66-year

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Thomas A. Weaver Jr. and Andrew J. Frishman

cases, but in 12 of these there were definite neurological abnormalities on examination and there was one death from intracerebral hemorrhage. In the entire series, 9 cases were complicated by extradural hematoma and 7 by subdural hematoma. Two of the latter were bilateral. In 3 cases the sagittal sinus was lacerated and in 4 the lateral sinus was torn. There were complicating fractures of the mastoid in 2 cases and of the frontal accessory sinuses in 10. Three patients developed postoperative generalized convulsions, all of which were controlled by the

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Arterio-Venous Angioma (Hamartoma) of the Brain with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Report of a Case with Operative Removal of the Hematoma and Recovery

Oscar A. Turner

intracerebral hematoma resulting from rupture of a deep vessel of an arterio-venous angioma (hamartoma) was removed surgically. It has been pointed out that acute symptoms of intracranial pressure in the presence of a vascular lesion may be caused in several ways and that intracerebral hemorrhage may not necessarily prove fatal. REFERENCES 1. Bergstrand , H. , Olivecrona , H. , and Tönnis , W. Gefässmissbildungen und Gefässgeschwülste des Gehirns. Leipzig : Georg Thieme , 1936 , 181 pp. Bergstrand , H., Olivecrona , H., and

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. McCorkle Helen Warmer November 1946 3 6 533 537 10.3171/jns.1946.3.6.0533 Cerebral Granuloma Due to Schistosomiasis Japonica Homer S. Swanson November 1946 3 6 538 542 10.3171/jns.1946.3.6.0538 Arterio-Venous Angioma (Hamartoma) of the Brain with Intracerebral Hemorrhage Oscar A. Turner November 1946 3 6 542 548 10.3171/jns.1946.3.6.0542 A New Method for the Control of Hemorrhage in Cerebral Surgery Mason Trupp November 1946 3 6 548 549 10.3171/jns.1946.3.6.0548 A Sponge Rubber Plaster Collar Robert Slemmer

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Cerebral Swelling

Histopathology, Classification and Clinical Significance of Brain Edema

I. Mark Scheinker

attempt to group such descriptions as are available results in apparent confusion. Until relatively stable histopathologic definitions are established, this confusion will persist. This presentation is based on a study of 125 cases of cerebral swelling caused by space-consuming lesions (brain tumor and brain abscess), cerebral injury and by circulatory disturbances such as massive intracerebral hemorrhage or thrombosis of larger blood vessels. HISTORY The term cerebral edema is one of long usage. Local edema of the brain has long been recognized as occurring in

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Arteriovenous Aneurysms of the Brain

Report of Ten Cases of Total Removal of the Lesion

Gösta Norlén

he had an epileptic fit, and was unconscious for some minutes. The last report was in August 1948. He was still rather aphasic and was not able to work. Comment . In this case the development of a large subdural haematoma in connection with the rupture of the arteriovenous aneurysm made an urgent operation necessary. An angiography was first done and the lesion considered operable. The clinical end result in this case was not good. The large intracerebral haemorrhage had destroyed too much of the brain tissue. An improvement of the hemiparesis occurred, but the

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Arthur R. Elvidge and William H. Feindel

exhibited the slightest residual internal rotation of the foot on walking. He was willing to work if he could be given a position without too much writing. His original occupation called for a great deal of close application. Case 2. Neurosurg. No. b938 and 6871. Sudden collapse from subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, localized clinically to left frontal region. Improvement. Discharge from hospital 1 month later with recurrence the same day and readmission. Diodrast angiography demonstrating aneurysm of right anterior cerebral artery. Excision of aneurysm and