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Jasmine A. Thum

It is not possible to capture all the depth that composes Dr. Linda Liau: chair of the Neurosurgery Department at the University of California, Los Angeles; second woman to chair a neurosurgery program in the United States; first woman to chair the American Board of Neurological Surgery; first woman president of the Western Neurosurgical Society; and one of only a handful of neurosurgeons elected to the National Academy of Medicine. Her childhood and family history alone could fascinate several chapters of her life’s biography. Nonetheless, this brief biography hopes to capture the challenges, triumphs, cultural norms, and spirit that have shaped Dr. Liau’s experience as a successful leader, scientist, and neurosurgeon. This is a rare story. It describes the rise of not only an immigrant within neurosurgery—not unlike other giants in the field, Drs. Robert Spetzler, Jacques Marcos, Ossama Al-Mefty, and a handful of other contemporaries—but also another type of minority in neurosurgery: a woman.

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Juan Maiguel-Lapeira, Ivan Lozada-Martinez, Daniela Torres-Llinás, and Luis Moscote-Salazar

TO THE EDITOR: We read with great interest the article by Morcos 1 ( Morcos JJ. Brief encounters that last a lifetime: an immigrant neurosurgeon’s reflections on American exceptionalism, George Floyd, sunlight, and race. J Neurosurg . 2020;133[5]:1612–1615 ). The author, through lived experiences, tries to make us aware of the importance that small moments play in the life of an immigrant professional, focusing on his devotion to the career of medicine as he crossed all the barriers that appear on that complex road. First of all, we want to thank the

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Juan Maiguel-Lapeira, Ivan Lozada-Martinez, Daniela Torres-Llinás, and Luis Moscote-Salazar

TO THE EDITOR: We read with great interest the article by Morcos 1 ( Morcos JJ. Brief encounters that last a lifetime: an immigrant neurosurgeon’s reflections on American exceptionalism, George Floyd, sunlight, and race. J Neurosurg . 2020;133[5]:1612–1615 ). The author, through lived experiences, tries to make us aware of the importance that small moments play in the life of an immigrant professional, focusing on his devotion to the career of medicine as he crossed all the barriers that appear on that complex road. First of all, we want to thank the author for