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.3171/2008.8.JNS08236 2008.8.JNS08236 Collagen matrix duraplasty for posterior fossa surgery: evaluation of surgical technique in 52 adult patients Pradeep K. Narotam Fan Qiao Narendra Nathoo 8 2009 111 2 380 386 10.3171/2008.10.JNS08993 2008.10.JNS08993 Use of the h index in neurosurgery Janet Lee Kristin L. Kraus William T. Couldwell 8 2009 111 2 387 392 10.3171/2008.10.JNS08978 2008.10.JNS08978 Vascularized temporoparietal fascial flap for the treatment of a traumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistula in the middle cranial fossa Mahmoud Taha Thomas Carroll Jeremy McMahon

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Janet Lee, Kristin L. Kraus and William T. Couldwell

number of times that works by that author are cited by other authors. However, using a citation index alone also has some drawbacks: papers cited for reasons unrelated to the quality or utility of the study; 16 self citation; 7 and extremely highly cited papers (which could act as outliers that would distort the data). 21 Recently, new statistics have been proposed to provide more balanced methods of quantifying the publication record. These include the h index, 10 the g index, 3 and the AWCR. 14 Among these, the citation metric that has been most actively

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Francisco A. Ponce and Andres M. Lozano

methods through time and include various indices by which to quantify the impact of a work, an individual, or a journal. Currently, bibliometric informatics provides such data as the citation index for an article, the h index for individuals, and the impact factor for journals. The h index was first proposed only 4 years ago 10 and is now widely used in academia for such processes as evaluation for grant allocation, making offers of employment, promotion, tenure, and fellowship in medical or scientific societies. 3 As bibliometrics continues to advance, indices

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Francisco A. Ponce and Andres M. Lozano

T here is some interest in comparing and bench-marking relative rankings in academia, whether of universities, departments within universities, or among individuals. To this end, the h index was introduced in 2005 as a means for characterizing the scientific output of a researcher. 4 The h index is defined as the number of papers, h , by an individual with citation counts of h or higher. The citation count—the number of times an article has been cited by other works—is often used as a measure of impact, and we recently used this to identify and

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Academic impact and rankings of American and Canadian neurosurgical departments as assessed using the h index Francisco A. Ponce Andres M. Lozano 9 2010 113 3 447 457 10.3171/2010.3.JNS1032 2010.3.JNS1032 Editorial Robert R. Cima 9 2010 113 3 458 460 10.3171/2009.10.JNS091399 2009.10.JNS091399 Wrong-site craniotomy: analysis of 35 cases and systems for prevention Fred. L. Cohen Daniel Mendelsohn Mark Bernstein 9 2010 113 3 461 473 10.3171/2009.10.JNS091282 2009.10.JNS091282 Cause-specific mortality among neurosurgeons S. Scott Lollis Pablo A. Valdes

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Survey of the h index for all of academic neurosurgery: another power-law phenomenon? Christopher M. Spearman Madeline J. Quigley Matthew R. Quigley Jack E. Wilberger 11 2010 113 5 929 933 10.3171/2010.4.JNS091842 2010.4.JNS091842 Location, sidedness, and sex distribution of intracranial arachnoid cysts in a population-based sample Christian A. Helland Morten Lund-Johansen Knut Wester 11 2010 113 5 934 939 10.3171/2009.11.JNS081663 2009.11.JNS081663 Effectiveness of an epidural blood patch for patients with intracranial hypotension syndrome and

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Christopher M. Spearman, Madeline J. Quigley, Matthew R. Quigley and Jack E. Wilberger

W ith the widespread availability of online databases, bibliometrics are increasingly being used to evaluate academic faculty for promotion and tenure. Traditionally these metrics have included total number of publications, total number of citations, and average number of citations. In 2005, Hirsch, 7 a physicist at the University of California, San Diego, proposed a novel bibliometric to assess the impact of an individual researcher's scientific output. Termed the h index, he defined the metric as the number of publications in an individual's curriculum

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Mikhail Chernov, Yoshihiro Muragaki and Hiroshi Iseki

in some countries, including Japan, the IF of a journal in which an article has appeared plays a rather important role in the evaluation of individual academic activity, it may be insufficient, and therefore the assessment of other bibliographic parameters, for example, citation index or h index, 1–3 should also be used for such purposes. Second, reports on the results of randomized clinical trials seemingly have the greatest scientific impact in neurosurgery, which may be further increased if such papers are published in highly respected general medical

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Peter G. Campbell, Olatilewa O. Awe, Mitchell G. Maltenfort, Darius M. Moshfeghi, Theodore Leng, Andrew A. Moshfeghi and John K. Ratliff

published, clinical productivity, number of faculty, and the academic degrees held by the faculty. 12 , 19 A recently proposed measure, the h-index, is based on an author's most cited articles and the number of citations each of these articles receives. 11 This measurement evaluates the combination of quantity as well as the quality of papers produced, based on peers' citations. The above measures are often compared in aggregate to assess the contribution of each center to the current academic milieu. Little attention has been directed toward the ability of centers to

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Jason S. Hauptman, Daniel S. Chow, Neil A. Martin and Michael W. Itagaki

would be the h-index, g-index, or Eigenfactor score. The Netherlands, Switzerland, and Sweden also have notably high JIFs but significantly fewer publications. Some of mean JIFs for lower-producing countries may be skewed by smaller numbers of publications within extremely high–impact journals. Therefore, when assessing the productivity and impact factors, it is important to weigh the mean JIF by the number of total publications generated by a particular country. Article Type Over two-thirds of all general research articles, case reports, and reviews originated