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The Use of Products Prepared from Human Fibrinogen and Human Thrombin in Neurosurgery

Fibrin Foams as Hemostatic Agents; Fibrin Films in Repair of Dural Defects and in Prevention of Meningocerebral Adhesions

Franc D. Ingraham and Orville T. Bailey

agent. 5 The protein part, which makes up from 20 to 60 per cent of the films by weight, is at least 90 per cent fibrin. At the time the films are prepared, the remainder is composed of glycerol. However, the immersion of the films in water or saline removes the glycerol and the water which the film takes up should be regarded as the final plasticizer under these conditions. The films are smooth, translucent, uniform sheets with a considerable amount of elasticity. They are sufficiently strong to be sutured without tearing and can be easily trimmed to fit the dural

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Marcus Singer

Department of Physical Chemistry, Harvard Medical School in the course of fractionation of human blood plasma and have been described elsewhere. 3, 5, 6 The type of film employed in these studies contains the protein fibrin in highly concentrated form and a glycerol plasticizer which is readily replaced by water or saline upon immersion. Sheets of film from which appropriate lengths can be cut have been made available in a range of thicknesses characterized by the weight of fibrin per sq. cm. The 3-mg. film, used in most experiments reported here, is among the thinnest

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William H. Sweet and Manucher Javid

the parent atom of B 10 or to the cells in its immediate vicinity. Our results to date suggest that boron may be given intravenously in man in a form that will concentrate in brain tumors to a clinically useful degree. We have given i.v. to 23 adults with brain tumor 5.0 g. of borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ⋅10H 2 O), containing 0.57 g. of boron. In another 35 patients the injected agent contained 6.3 g. of glycerol to each 5.0 g. of borax. A loose bond is said to be formed between the two and we hoped that this might diminish their entry into normal brain but not into

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Ayub K. Ommaya and Maitland Baldwin

technique, local cooling of exact areas can be achieved 29 ( Fig. 3 ). Air under pressure but controlled by a flowmeter passes through a copper cooling coil and enters a small metal chamber. Here it is allowed to expand and escape through side vents. In doing so, the cold air becomes much colder and this low temperature is transmitted by the metal chamber to a small amount (10 to 12 cc.) of 10 per cent glycerol in water in a flaccid latex sac attached to the base of the chamber. When this sac is placed against the brain, its fluid-filled shape adjusts itself closely and

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Experimental Concussion Ayub K. Ommaya S. David Rockoff Maitland Baldwin Walter S. Friauf April 1964 21 4 249 265 10.3171/jns.1964.21.4.0249 Assessment of the Natural History of Anterior Communicating Aneurysms Alan E. Richardson John A. Jane Peter M. Payne April 1964 21 4 266 274 10.3171/jns.1964.21.4.0266 Continuous Spinal Drainage in the Treatment of Postoperative Cerebrospinal-Fluid Fistulae R. R. Aitken C. G. Drake April 1964 21 4 275 277 10.3171/jns.1964.21.4.0275 Oral Glycerol for the

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Giampaolo Cantore, Beniamino Guidetti and Michele Virno

L iterature of recent years reports several works on the clinical use of hypertonic solutions administered by slow intravenous infusion for reduction of intracranial pressure. 3, 7–9, 13, 19 Among the numerous osmotic agents tested to reduce experimentally induced cerebral edema in the animal, 15 glycerol has proved particularly effective both by intravenous and oral route. 18 Considering such experimental results, glycerol has been applied on neurological, 2 ophthalmological 16, 17 and, chiefly, neurosurgical 2 patients. Glycerol (1,2,3-propanetriol

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John L. Fox

. Increase vascular osmotic pressure—infusion of osmotic agents (urea, mannitol, salts, sugars, albumin, glycerol, dextran, THAM) 4. Reduce osmotic pressure of brain water and impermeability of cell membrane (surface tension) a) Limitation of iatrogenic physical and physiological brain trauma b) Administration of cortisone drugs c) Reduction of CO 2 pressure (same methods as II, B, 4, a–c) 5. Reduce metabolism of brain cells a) Prevent hyperthermia b) Induce

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Manucher Javid, David Gilboe and Thomas Cesario

manometers were filled with sterile nonpyrogenic isotonic saline with the zero base line at the level of the cisterna magna. The dogs were divided into 6 groups: Group I—50 control dogs whose cerebrospinal-fluid pressure was recorded for periods ranging from 12–36 hrs. Group II—35 dogs received 1 gm./kg. body weight of 30 per cent urea in 10 per cent invert sugar. Group III—8 dogs received 20 per cent mannitol. Group IV—6 dogs received 48 per cent glycerol. Group V—5 dogs received 15 per cent glycine. All agents in Groups III–V were given on an equimolar basis with 1 gm

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S. Mandell, J. M. Taylor, D. G. Kotsilimbas and L. C. Scheinberg

I t is hardly necessary to enumerate the various symptoms and signs of cerebral edema in a neurosurgical journal, but its management in many clinical conditions still remains a problem. Since the rediscovery of the efficacy of intravenous hypertonic urea solutions, 5 there has been a search for other less toxic substances. These have included hypertonic sodium chloride, hypertonic sucrose, magnesium sulphate, mannitol and sorbitol. Glycerol has been tried, as it has an osmotic action, and also has the advantage of low toxicity and versatility of

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Blood Supply of Cervical Spinal Cord in Man Ian M. Turnbull Alf Brieg Ove Hassler June 1966 24 6 951 965 10.3171/jns.1966.24.6.0951 Angiographic End-Results of Carotid Ligation in the Treatment of Carotid Aneurysm Fredric M. Somach Henry A. Shenkin June 1966 24 6 966 974 10.3171/jns.1966.24.6.0966 Acute Brain Swelling in Neurosurgical Patients Thomas W. Langfitt Neal F. Kassell June 1966 24 6 975 983 10.3171/jns.1966.24.6.0975 The Effect of Glycerol on Cerebral Edema Induced by Tri-ethyltin Sulphate in Rabbits S. Mandell J. M. Taylor D. G