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Parisa Nicole Fallah and Mark Bernstein

These statistics have a profound implication for the global economy, with a projected $20.3 trillion loss between 2015 and 2030 due to lack of access to surgical care. Of that estimate, $12.3 trillion will be lost from LMICs, leading to decreased development potential for those countries. 24 The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery has defined the most basic surgical needs worldwide as the bellwether procedures: laparotomies, cesarean sections, and treatment of open fractures. 24 With these defined needs, the surgical specialties most commonly associated with global

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Parisa Nicole Fallah and Mark Bernstein

These statistics have a profound implication for the global economy, with a projected $20.3 trillion loss between 2015 and 2030 due to lack of access to surgical care. Of that estimate, $12.3 trillion will be lost from LMICs, leading to decreased development potential for those countries. 24 The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery has defined the most basic surgical needs worldwide as the bellwether procedures: laparotomies, cesarean sections, and treatment of open fractures. 24 With these defined needs, the surgical specialties most commonly associated with global

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Ryan T. Muir, Shelly Wang and Benjamin C. Warf

understanding of its etiology and characteristics, and the initiation of programs by a number of groups and organizations to increase access to treatment for these children. This narrative literature review attempts to summarize what is known, highlight what is being done, and encourage broader engagement from the pediatric neurosurgery community. Methods A literature search was performed using MEDLINE and Embase from database inception to the present, using terms pertaining to global surgery, developing countries and pediatric hydrocephalus, limited to English

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Chiazor U. Onyia and Omotayo A. Ojo

TO THE EDITOR: We read with keen interest the recent article by Fallah and Bernstein 4 ( Fallah PN, Bernstein M: Barriers to participation in global surgery academic collaborations, and possible solutions: a qualitative study. J Neurosurg [epub ahead of print April 6, 2018. DOI: 10.3171/2017.10.JNS17435] ). We commend the efforts of the authors in carrying out this study, especially for suggesting solutions to the barriers between surgeons in high-income countries and those in low- and middle-income countries as revealed by the study. In addition to their

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Swagoto Mukhopadhyay, Maria Punchak, Abbas Rattani, Ya-Ching Hung, James Dahm, Serena Faruque, Michael C. Dewan, Sophie Peeters, Sonal Sachdev and Kee B. Park

WHO, the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS), and the Global Neurosurgery Initiative under the Program for Global Surgery and Social Change (PGSSC) at Harvard Medical School. Methods This study involved 3 key steps: 1) global survey/literature review to obtain the number of working neurosurgeons per WHO-recognized country, 2) regression to interpolate any missing data, and 3) a calculation of workforce densities and comparison to available historical data by WHO region. Global Survey From February 2016 to July 2017, primary data were collected and

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Gail Rosseau, Walter D. Johnson, Kee B. Park, Peter J. Hutchinson, Laura Lippa, Russell Andrews, Franco Servadei and Roxanna M. Garcia

T he World Health Assembly (WHA), a forum for the decision-making body of the World Health Organization (WHO), is attended by its 194 Member States and focuses on specific agenda items prepared by the Executive Board. It occurs annually to determine policies within the WHO, appoint the director-general, supervise finances for global health priorities, and approve program budgets. Last year, we reported a summary of the WHA and the significant momentum that continues to build around the field of global neurosurgery. 14 Global surgery as a formal area of

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Michael C. Dewan, Abbas Rattani, Graham Fieggen, Miguel A. Arraez, Franco Servadei, Frederick A. Boop, Walter D. Johnson, Benjamin C. Warf and Kee B. Park

I n 2015, the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery offered a summary of the surgical burden and described existing gaps in the provision of safe and affordable surgical care worldwide. 11 More than two-thirds of the world’s population lack access to appropriate surgical and anesthetic care, equating to an estimated 143 million necessary surgical procedures that are left undone. This untreated surgical disease results in extreme economic costs and profound disability and death. 17 Within this tremendous burden of surgical disease resides the contribution of

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Gail Rosseau, Walter D. Johnson, Kee B. Park, Miguel Arráez Sánchez, Franco Servadei and Kerry A. Vaughan

, however, was long considered a luxury in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where progress has stagnated or even regressed in the past 25 years. The perception of surgery as the “neglected stepchild of public health” led to the launch of The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. In April 2015, the Commission reported 5 key messages: 1) 5 billion people do not have access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care; 2) 143 million additional surgical procedures are needed in LMICs each year to save lives and prevent disability; 3) 33 million people face

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Global neurosurgery: innovators, strategies, and the way forward

JNSPG 75th Anniversary Invited Review Article

Michael M. Haglund and Anthony T. Fuller

. 15 , 17 Equitable distribution of healthcare advancements and overall improvement of quality healthcare has been and continues to be a major global challenge. 25 , 57 Global health as an area of intellectual engagement began, in part, as a response to solving this problem. Most of the early work in global health focused on infectious disease, and only within the last 10–15 years have global health efforts shifted to be fully inclusive of surgery, moving global surgery from its position as the “neglected stepchild.” 18 The landmark work pushing global surgery into

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Jihad Abdelgadir, Cyrus Elahi, Jacquelyn Corley, Kevin C. Wall, Josephine N. Najjuma, Alex Muhindo, Joao Ricardo Nickenig Vissoci, Michael M. Haglund and David Kitya

108 : 844 – 849 , 849.e1–849.e4, 2017 28826868 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.08.045 18 Popp A : Neurosurgical workforce: Examining the physician supply controversy . AANS Bull 9 : 7 – 9 , 2000 19 Rosman J , Slane S , Dery B , Vogelbaum MA , Cohen-Gadol AA , Couldwell WT : Is there a shortage of neurosurgeons in the United States? Neurosurgery 73 : 354 – 366 , 2013 10.1227/01.neu.0000430762.08458.49 20 Sader E , Yee P , Hodaie M : Barriers to neurosurgical training in Sub-Saharan Africa: the need for a phased approach to global surgery