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Henry T. Wycis

. There was a Hoffmann sign on the right side with bilateral Babinski responses, more easily elicited on the right side. There was marked weakness in motor power of the right upper and lower limbs. The motor weakness was mild on the left side. There was a bilateral dysmetria and dyskinesia of the upper limbs, more pronounced on the right side. Ataxia was pronounced in both lower limbs, but also was more exaggerated on the right side. Sensory disturbances to pain and temperature were not distinct. However, he was able to appreciate an ice tube more acutely on the

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Paul F. A. Hoefer and Sidney M. Cohen

. Hoefer , P. F. A. Physiology of motor innervation in the dyskinesias. Res. Publ. Ass. nerv. ment. Dis. , 1942 , 21 : 502 – 528 . Hoefer , P. F. A. Physiology of motor innervation in the dyskinesias. Res. Publ. Ass. nerv. ment. Dis. , 1942, 21: 502–528. 8. Hoefer , P. F. A. Electromyographic study of the motor system in man. Mschr. Psychiat. Neurol. , 1949 , 117 : 241 – 256 . Hoefer , P. F. A. Electromyographic study of the motor system in man. Mschr. Psychiat. Neurol. , 1949, 117: 241–256. 9

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H. T. Wycis

elicited. The Babinski sign could not be demonstrated on either side. Sensation to pain and temperature was decreased bilaterally from C3 to T5. Touch sensation was decreased over the same areas but particularly over the 4th thoracic dermatome. Position and vibration sensations were decreased in both upper limbs but more so in both lower limbs. There was marked dyskinesia in the right upper limb and dysmetria in both upper limbs. Fig. 1. Photograph of patient showing low hair line, short neck and the pad of fat posteriorly. Spinal puncture revealed a

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M. Hunter Brown and M. N. Walsh

, M. Nonne , and B. Pfeifer , Ed. Berlin : S. Karger , 1923 , 7th ed. , 2 : 1056 – 1077 . Oppenheim , H. Lehrbuch der Nervenkrankheiten für Ärzte und Studierende. R. Cassirer, K. Goldstein, M. Nonne, and B. Pfeifer, Ed. Berlin: S. Karger , 1923, 7th ed., 2: 1056–1077. 7. Putnam , T. J. The surgical treatment of the dyskinesias. Ann. west. Med. Surg. , 1949 , 3 : 407 – 409 . Putnam , T. J. The surgical treatment of the dyskinesias. Ann. west. Med. Surg. , 1949, 3: 407

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William A. Nosik and Andre A. Weil

W e are concerned here with the existence of hemifacial spasm as an apparent neurological or psychoneurological disturbance characterized by paroxysmal twitching of all, or part, of the musculature of the face. A review of the extensive literature on this subject has been presented by the authors 18 in another publication, and reveals a wide divergence of opinion regarding the etiology, classification, and treatment of the facial dyskinesias. Considering these discrepancies it seems strange that clinicians have not made more effective use of the aid proffered

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Richard E. Strain and Irwin Perlmutter

treatment of athetosis by section of extrapyramidal tracts in the spinal cord. Arch. Neurol. Psychiat., Chicago , 1938, 39: 258–272. 15. Putnam , T. J. The surgical treatment of the dyskinesias. Ann. west. Med. Surg. , 1949 , 3 : 407 – 409 . Putnam , T. J. The surgical treatment of the dyskinesias. Ann. west. Med. Surg. , 1949, 3: 407–409. 16. Talairach , J. , Paillas , J. E. , and David , M. Dyskinésie de type hémiballique traitée par cortectomie frontale limitée, puis par

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Edgar M. Housepian and Malcolm B. Carpenter

brains with pathology were omitted from the tabulation, but it is notable that the calculated “geographic center” of the globus pallidus obtained for these brains was the same as for the normal brains, although greater variation was seen in the pallidal configuration. DISCUSSION Recent experimental studies as well as clinical observations indicate that localized lesions of the globus pallidus may ameliorate and in some instances abolish dyskinesia and disorders of muscle tonus associated with certain specific extrapyramidal disorders. In the rhesus monkey

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José M. R. Delgado

from a rapidly progressive disease process. We feel that such patients are victims of widespread cerebral pathology, as indicated by clinical and psychometric studies, pneumoencephalography, and the gross pathological appearance of the brain at operation. However, in 2 other such patients having no significant relief of tremor or rigidity, pallidal surgery led to distinct lasting psychological improvement. May we ask Dr. Bertrand and other speakers if they have noted a similar dissociation of postoperative effects suggesting that dyskinesia, hypo- or bradykinesia

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Russell Meyers, William J. Fry, Frank J. Fry, Leroy L. Dreyer, Donald F. Schultz and Robert F. Noyes

. Carpenter , M. B. Neuroanatomical basis of dyskinesia. Presented at 6th annual meeting of Houston Neurological Society , Houston, Texas , March 13, 1958 . (In press) Carpenter , M. B. Neuroanatomical basis of dyskinesia. Presented at 6th annual meeting of Houston Neurological Society, Houston, Texas, March 13, 1958. (In press) 12. Cooper , I. S. , and Bravo , G. Chemopallidectomy and chemothalamectomy. J. Neurosurg. , 1958 , 15 : 244 – 250 . Cooper , I. S., and Bravo , G. Chemopallidectomy

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Eldon L. Foltz, Lawrence M. Knopp and Arthur A. Ward Jr.

instances of spasmodic torticollis in humans, therapy resulted not only in objective reduction of torticollis when the patients were under emotional stress but the functional disability was reduced to a point where they were able to return to their previous occupations. It may be of some importance that the dyskinesia in both these instances was confined to a simple nonprogressing spasmodic torticollis. In the other 3 cases, only minor degrees of improvement were obtained with anticholinergic therapy, and the spasmodic abnormal movements gradually spread to involve axial