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Intracranial epithelial cysts

Report of two cases

Beth J. L. MacGregor, Jeffrey Gawler and John R. South

these lesions has usually been unsuspected before surgical exploration or necropsy. We found computerized tomography with the EMI scanner of considerable diagnostic assistance in both our patients, as it was possible to identify the presence of a fluid-filled cyst prior to operation. Case Reports Case 1 This 38-year-old man was first admitted to the National Hospital in 1964 with a 6-month history of right-sided focal epilepsy; he had also noted weakness of the right arm and face prior to admission. First Admission The patient had a mild right

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evoked spinal electrogram Yasuhiko Matsukado Mamoru Yoshida Tomokazu Goya Koki Shimoji April 1976 44 4 435 441 10.3171/jns.1976.44.4.0435 Glioblastoma multiforme in children George J. Dohrmann Jacqueline R. Farwell John T. Flannery April 1976 44 4 442 448 10.3171/jns.1976.44.4.0442 Tumor volume, luxury perfusion, and regional blood volume changes in man visualized by subtraction computerized tomography Richard D. Penn Randal Walser Diane Kurtz Laurens Ackerman April 1976 44 4 449 457 10.3171/jns.1976.44.4.0449 Computer mapping of brain-stem sensory

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Richard D. Penn, Randal Walser, Diane Kurtz and Laurens Ackerman

different. Computerized tomography scanning requires 4 to 5 minutes, and angiographic pictures may be taken in fractions of seconds. The spatial resolution of CAT scanning is also much less precise than angiography. For example, the large arteries at the base of the brain are rarely delineated on CAT infusion scans. On the other hand, the CAT scan is able to measure extremely small changes in overall tissue density. The infused contrast material distributed in all the blood vessels of the central nervous system is detected even though the blood volume is only 3.0% of the

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agents, but only indicate that some caution is necessary in the interpretation of these responses, especially if the factors mentioned above are not rigidly controlled in a randomized study. Our inability to control these factors and to develop accurate clinical criteria for tumor activity have made survival time the only objective evaluation, however inadequate, of the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on the patient's tumor. Currently we, as well as others, are cautiously optimistic that computerized tomography may give us a truly objective measure of tumor activity

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Glen G. Glista, Ross H. Miller, Leonard T. Kurland and Mark L. Jereczek

performed by the Department of Neurosurgery, the numbers reported probably reflect accurately the incidence of surgically treated disc disease in residents of Olmsted County. Discussion Table 2 shows that the number of pneumoencephalograms performed declined in 1973 and 1974. This decline is most probably explained by introduction of the computerized tomography (CT) scanner at this clinic in July, 1973. Patients with such problems as presenile dementia or seizures, who previously might have undergone pneumoencephalography, are being scanned by CT which

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George D. Zuidema

importance of diagnostic studies in neurosurgical work loads, it is fair to point out that the further development of computerized tomography of the brain, and its increasing availability in medical centers throughout the United States, may have a significant effect upon the numbers and kinds of diagnostic procedures performed in the future. Another approach to the examination of work loads is included in the SOSSUS area studies. These reviews were conducted by research teams under the direction of Dr. Osler Peterson, and the approach involved visits to four geographical

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Richard D. Penn and Diane Kurtz

M ass lesions within the intracranial cavity may cause damage due to local pressure, distortion of cerebral blood vessels and circulation, and cerebral edema. Measurement of these effects in man has been difficult and involves invasive techniques such as the intracarotid injection of radioactive tracers to determine regional blood flow and the implantation of intracranial pressure monitors. With the advent of computerized tomography (CT), many of these factors can now be studied in vivo non-invasively, and the precise size and location of a mass lesion and

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Stanley Tchang, Guiseppe Scotti, Karel Terbrugge, Denis Melançon, Gary Bélanger, Curt Milner and Romeo Ethier

T he value of computerized tomography (CT) in the demonstration of intracranial neoplasms has been widely demonstrated. 1, 5, 10–12 The accuracy of CT in detecting and outlining cerebral tumors is significantly improved after intravenous injection of contrast material. 2, 3, 6, 8 Several authors have recently attempted to differentiate major groups of tumors such as gliomas, meningiomas, and metastasis on the basis of CT appearance. However, no systematic attempt has yet been made to find a possible correlation between the CT appearance and the histological

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Joseph C. Maroon, William O. Bank, Burton P. Drayer and Arthur E. Rosenbaum

T he neurodiagnostic approach to intracranial tumors has been markedly advanced by the use of computerized tomography (CT). Assessment of relative tissue absorption and integrity of the physiological blood-brain barrier allows visualization of tumor capsules, cysts, infiltrative patterns, structural displacement, and cerebral edema. With such precision in intracranial localization, CT seems to be extremely valuable for interventional techniques such as tumor biopsy, cyst aspiration, and abscess drainage. Although only a two-dimensional display is now generally

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.46.6.0731 Computerized tomography as a possible aid to histological grading of supratentorial gliomas Stanley Tchang Guiseppe Scotti Karel Terbrugge Denis Melançon Gary Bélanger Curt Milner Romeo Ethier June 1977 46 6 735 739 10.3171/jns.1977.46.6.0735 Intracranial biopsy assisted by computerized tomography Joseph C. Maroon William O. Bank Burton P. Drayer Arthur E. Rosenbaum June 1977 46 6 740 744 10.3171/jns.1977.46.6.0740 The mechanism of spinal cord cavitation following spinal cord transection Chun C. Kao Louis W. Chang James M. B. Bloodworth Jr. June 1977 46 6