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Sylvia Shitsama, Nunthasiri Wittayanakorn, Humphrey Okechi and A. Leland Albright

H ydrocephalus is the most common neurosurgical condition presenting for treatment in many hospitals in East Africa. 11 Infants with severe hydrocephalus or hydranencephaly often present with extreme macrocephaly, poor feeding, malnutrition, and scalp ulceration. Their risks associated with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts, particularly the risks of infection, CSF leakage and wound breakdown, are appreciably increased in these patients—to 50% in one series. 9 Choroid plexus coagulation (CPC) is one treatment option to manage hydrocephalus and

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Atsushi Okano and Hideki Ogiwara

S hunt surgery is the most common treatment for children with infantile hydrocephalus. However, it can be associated with several long-term complications, such as shunt infection, shunt malfunction, and shunt dependency. Endoscopic choroid plexus coagulation (CPC) and endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) are alternative surgeries that may avoid the need for shunt surgery. It is known that the success rate for ETV is rather low, especially in pediatric patients younger than 2 years of age. 4 , 7 , 12 , 14 More recently, Warf reported that ETV combined with CPC

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Michael D. Cusimano , M.D., F.R.C.S.(C) University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada 982 982 I read the report of Whitfield, Guazzo, and Pickard with interest (Whitfield PC, Guazzo EP, Pickard JD: Safe removal of retained ventricular catheters using intraluminal choroid plexus coagulation. Technical note. J Neurosurg 83: 1101–1102, December, 1995). They have had outstanding success with a technique that we have also used previously. Readers should be

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Michael J. Chaparro , M.D. The Children's Medical Center Dayton, Ohio 981 982 I would like to comment on the paper by Whitfield and colleagues (Whitfield PC, Guazzo EP, Pickard JD: Safe removal of retained ventricular catheters using intraluminal choroid plexus coagulation. Technical note. J Neurosurg 83: 1101–1102, December, 1995). I have used this technique of monopolar cauterization of choroid plexus for freeing retained catheters for 8 years and

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Joseph H. Piatt , Jr. , M.D. Oregon Health Sciences University Portland, Oregon 982 982 I expect that you have been deluged with letters from former trainees of E. Bruce Hendrick regarding the cover article of the December 1995 issue (Whitfield PC, Guazzo EP, Pickard JD: Safe removal of retained ventricular catheters using intraluminal choroid plexus coagulation. Technical note. J Neurosurg 83: 1101–1102, December, 1995). Dr. Hendrick was the first

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor R. Michael Scott , M.D. Children's Hospital Boston, Massachusetts 982 983 I enjoyed the article by Whitfield, et al. (Whitfield PC, Guazzo EP, Pickard JD: Safe removal of retained ventricular catheters using intraluminal choroid plexus coagulation. Technical note. J Neurosurg 83: 1101–1102, December, 1995). We too have been using this technique for several years, and it is described in my chapter dealing with shunt complications in the most recent

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Michael Koutzoglou , M.D. , Andreas Yannopoulos , M.D. Aghia Sophia Children's Hospital Athens, Greece 980 981 We read with interest the article by Whitfield, et al. (Whitfield PC, Guazzo EP, Pickard JD: Safe removal of a retained ventricular catheters using intraluminal choroid plexus coagulation. Technical note. J Neurosurg 83: 1101–1102, December, 1995). The authors describe a technique that facilitates removal of a retained

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Paul Steinbok , M.B.B.S., F.R.C.S.(C) , D. Doug Cochrane , M.D., F.R.C.S.(C) University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 981 981 We read with interest the technical note by Whitfield and colleagues (Whitfield PC, Guazzo EP, Pickard JD: Safe removal of retained ventricular catheters using intraluminal choroid plexus coagulation. Technical note. J Neurosurg 83: 1101–1102, December, 1995). We were somewhat

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Michael J. Higgins , M.D. , Enrique C. G. Ventureyra , M.D., F.R.C.S.(C) Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 980 980 We read with interest the recent technical note by Whitfield, et al. (Whitfield PC, Guazzo EP, Pickard JD: Safe removal of retained ventricular catheters using intraluminal choroid plexus coagulation. Technical note. J Neurosurg 83: 1101–1102, December, 1995) that described the use of

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Hardik Sardana and Shweta Kedia

TO THE EDITOR: We read with keen interest the article by Okano and Ogiwara 2 ( Okano A, Ogiwara H: Long-term follow-up for patients with infantile hydrocephalus treated by choroid plexus coagulation. J Neurosurg Pediatr 22: 638–645, December 2018 ). We commend the authors for analyzing this clinically relevant issue. They concluded that choroid plexus coagulation (CPC) with or without endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) can be a safe and effective treatment in children with infantile hydrocephalus and that long-term control of hydrocephalus and normal