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Theodore W. Eller, Lawrence P. Bernstein, Richard S. Rosenberg and David G. McLone

T he clinical syndrome and anatomic characteristics of the tethered spinal cord are well known and have recently been reviewed. 4 Most definitions of this entity, however, only recognize tethering of the caudal spinal cord (conus medullaris) associated with a short filum terminale, fibrous bands, or intradural lipoma. 2 Occasional patients have been reported with cords tethered at the thoracic level. 1 A case of symptomatic tethered cervical spinal cord is presented which improved following corrective surgery. Case Report This 23-year-old woman

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J. Bob Blacklock, Terry W. Hood and Robert E. Maxwell

W e are reporting a case of spontaneous intramedullary cervical spinal cord abscess. This is only the second such patient with an acute onset (less than 7 days) who survived, 2, 9 and the second case in a patient older than 70 years of age. 3 Case Report This 71-year-old right-handed retired machinist presented on July 7, 1981, with the chief complaint of severe upper back pain and inability to stand and walk. He complained of right-sided weakness of 5 days' duration and pain in the right forearm, hand, and intrascapular area. The onset of pain and

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William G. Wood, Lewis M. Rothman and Berl E. Nussbaum

retrograde brachial angiography was performed, and no abnormalities were noted despite utilization of photographic substraction techniques. Fig. 1. Myelogram. Left: Frontal view demonstrates widening of the upper cervical spinal cord consistent with an intramedullary mass. The arrow indicates a lobular filling defect on the right ventrolateral surface of the cord. Right: Right anterior oblique view more clearly reveals the lobulated filling defect (short arrow) . A linear defect is present extending superiorly from the lobular defect (long arrow) . These

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Jawad M. Khalifeh, Christopher F. Dibble, Anna Van Voorhis, Michelle Doering, Martin I. Boyer, Mark A. Mahan, Thomas J. Wilson, Rajiv Midha, Lynda J. S. Yang and Wilson Z. Ray

‘spinal cord injuries’:ti,ab,kw,de OR ‘spinal cord trauma’:ti,ab,kw,de OR ‘spinal cord traumas’:ti,ab,kw,de OR ‘spinal cord compression’:ti,ab,kw,de OR ‘traumatic myelopathy’:ti,ab,kw,de OR ‘post-traumatic myelopathy’:ti,ab,kw,de OR ‘central cord syndrome’:ti,ab,kw,de OR ((‘spinal cord’ NEAR/4 (injur* OR trauma* OR compression* OR lesion* OR transection OR laceration* OR contusion*)):ti,ab,kw,de)) AND (‘cervical spinal cord’/exp OR midcervical:ti,ab,kw,de OR cervical:ti,ab,kw,de OR ‘accessory nucleus’:ti,ab,kw,de or ‘phrenic nucleus’:ti,ab,kw,de)) OR ‘cervical spinal

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George J. Dohrmann

M cLaurin , et al., 11 examined the spinal cords of dogs with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus and noted myelomalacia and cavity formation secondary to the adhesive arachnoiditis. The purpose of the present study is to further describe the changes in the cervical spinal cord of dogs with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus and to study alterations of the histopathology by ventriculojugular shunt procedures. Materials and Methods Twenty adult female mongrel dogs, weighing 20 to 25 kg, were anesthesized with sodium pentobarbital (22 mg/kg). In 13 dogs kaolin (20 mg

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Studies of experimental cervical spinal cord transection

Part I: Hemodynamic changes after acute cervical spinal cord transection

Phillip A. Tibbs, Byron Young, R. G. McAllister Jr., William H. Brooks and Laddie Tackett

A cute hemodynamic changes following traumatic interruption of the cervical spinal cord pose complex management problems in the quadriplegic patient due to imbalance in the parasympathetic and sympathetic components of autonomically mediated peripheral vascular and myocardial reflex mechanisms. Many aspects of the cardiovascular consequences of acute cervical cord injury remain unclear. This investigation was undertaken to provide a detailed characterization of the cardiovascular alterations that follow acute cervical spinal cord transection in dogs. Serial

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Jawad M. Khalifeh, Christopher F. Dibble, Anna Van Voorhis, Michelle Doering, Martin I. Boyer, Mark A. Mahan, Thomas J. Wilson, Rajiv Midha, Lynda J. S. Yang and Wilson Z. Ray

transfers in the upper extremity following cervical spinal cord injury. Part 1: Systematic review of the literature. DOI: 10.3171/2019.4.SPINE19173 . References 1 Ackery A , Tator C , Krassioukov A : A global perspective on spinal cord injury epidemiology . J Neurotrauma 21 : 1355 – 1370 , 2004 10.1089/neu.2004.21.1355 15672627 2 Ahuja CS , Nori S , Tetreault L , Wilson J , Kwon B , Harrop J , : Traumatic spinal cord injury–repair and regeneration . Neurosurgery 80 ( 3S ): S9 – S22 , 2017 10.1093/neuros/nyw080 3 Anderson KD

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Studies of experimental cervical spinal cord transection

Part II: Plasma norepinephrine levels after acute cervical spinal cord transection

Phillip A. Tibbs, Byron Young, Michael G. Ziegler and R. G. McAllister Jr.

pH were measured frequently and maintained at normal levels by adjustments of tidal volume and ventilatory rate. Cervical laminectomy was performed at C-6 in all dogs, and seven subsequently underwent cervical spinal cord transection with a scalpel blade. Heparinized blood was collected for determination of plasma NE concentration at T 0 (the time immediately after cord transection in the experimental group and a corresponding time in the laminectomized but non-transected control animals), and at intervals of 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes thereafter. Blood samples

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Stephen B. Tatter, Lawrence F. Borges and David N. Louis

microscopic findings of neuronal differentiation. 9, 13, 21 As a result, the possibility of central neurocytoma is now often raised in the differential diagnosis of an intraventricular tumor in an adult. To date, however, definite neurocytomas have not been documented below the tentorium. We report two cases of cervical spinal cord tumors that are pathologically identical to central neurocytoma on light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural examination. Case Reports Case 1 This 65-year-old man noted numbness and paresthesias in the left upper

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Hank H. Gosch, Elwyn Gooding and Richard C. Schneider

T he development of petechial hemorrhages in the upper cervical spinal cord segments in experimental cerebral trauma has been observed by several investigators. 2, 3, 11, 20 Jakob 11 found hemorrhages only after a considerable interval from the time of injury. Denny-Brown and Russell, 2 contrary to previous observations, regarded these as an immediate and direct result of acceleration concussion. The distance of these lesions from the site of injury has raised questions, not only of the mechanism of their formation, but also of the relation these findings