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Peter Dyck and John B. Doyle Jr.

T he pain of both intermittent claudication and so-called “pseudoclaudication” is often brought on by walking. Rest brings prompt relief from pain of muscle ischemia, but not necessarily from pain of radicular origin. We believe van Gelderen 16 was the first to make this observation. In 1948, he described two patients whose legs became painful, weak, and numb when they walked for 10 to 15 minutes. Both men also experienced the same pain when they stood erect, and were relieved of it when they sat down. One of the men played tennis, and rode his bicycle

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Tobias A. Mattei, Brandon J. Bond, Carlos R. Goulart, Chris A. Sloffer, Martin J. Morris and Julian J. Lin

A lthough several scientific advances have been observed in the clinical management of TBI in the pediatric population in recent years, 3 , 19 , 39 preventive measures that might provide a significant impact on the epidemiology of severe TBI in this population have been relegated to a position of secondary importance, both in public policies and in the field of medical research. According to a recent study involving 42,412 patients in which the prevalence of clinically important TBIs in children was evaluated, 28 bicycle-related injuries are classified

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Rebecca Y. Du, Melissa A. LoPresti, Roxanna M. García and Sandi Lam

.40–57.62 million), respectively. TBI caused 8.1 million (95% UI 6.0–10.4 million) years of life lived with disability. The worldwide economic impact of the loss and decreased quality of life due to TBI is significant. The direct and indirect cost of TBI in the US alone is estimated to be $76.5 billion (in 2010 US dollars). 12 TBI occurs most often due to road traffic accidents (RTAs), specifically head injuries among pediatric and young populations riding motorcycles and bicycles. 13 , 48 Head injuries are the leading cause of death in fatal motorcycle crashes. 44 Of the

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Blaine Hoshizaki, Michael Vassilyadi, Andrew Post and Anna Oeur

helmet for young children participating in winter activities. Methods The following 3 types of young children's helmets were used in this study: an ice hockey helmet, an alpine ski helmet, and a bicycle helmet. These 3 types of helmets were chosen because they are reported to be the most common helmets used by young children for winter activities. The major characteristics of each helmet are provided in Table 1 . The testing method involved using a monorail drop tower to simulate an impact similar to that expected for a child tobogganing. A children's head form

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Atman Desai, David W. Nierenberg and Ann-Christine Duhaime

antipsychotics given for sedation, with unrevealing serum urine laboratory tests and normal findings on intracranial imaging studies, strongly suggested the most likely diagnosis in this case and led to a change in management. Case Report History and Presentation This 13-year-old, 70-kg boy was involved in an unhelmeted bicycle crash while riding down a hill, with loss of consciousness for a few seconds. He sustained multiple facial abrasions, and immediately upon regaining consciousness he was noted to be agitated and combative. He was taken by emergency medical

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Symeon Missios, Kimon Bekelis and Robert J. Spinner

investigated PNI association with several patient characteristics. We used a regression model in a cohort of children who had sustained trauma (during motor vehicle crashes, motorcycle crashes, bicycle crashes, pedestrian accidents, other crashes, and falls) and for whom data were recorded in the 2009–2011 NTDB. The advantage of using a comprehensive database, such as the NTDB, is that it provides an adequate volume of events for studying a rare entity such as PNIs. Methods The NTDB We included in our analysis all patients who were younger than 18 years, had

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Ting Lei, Evgenii Belykh, Alexander B. Dru, Kaan Yagmurlu, Ali M. Elhadi, Peter Nakaji and Mark C. Preul

Goldbach's conjecture, Chen was riding a bicycle from his house in Beijing to his favorite bookstore, Xinhua Bookstore, when he was hit by a young man also riding a bicycle at high speed. Chen was knocked unconscious and transported to a regional hospital. After treating his severe closed-head injury, doctors became suspicious of an underlying movement disorder that was not explained by his injuries. Chen was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, which was markedly affecting his cognition. Bad fortune continued for Chen when, just a few months after his discharge, he was

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, rhabdomyolysis, and cardiovascular collapse. The patient had been treated for 4 days at a referring hospital for a severe closed head injury sustained in a fall from a bicycle. During treatment for elevations of intracranial pressure, she received a continuous propofol infusion (100 µg/kg/min). The patient began to exhibit severe high anion gap/low lactate metabolic acidosis, and was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit at the authors' institution. On arrival there, the patient's Glasgow Coma Scale score was 3 and this remained unchanged during her brief stay

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Michael L. Cannon, Steven S. Glazier and Loren A. Bauman

acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and myocardial failure. It is unclear whether the severe head trauma predisposed the patient in some way to the idiosyncratic effects of propofol in this case. Case Report History This 13-year-old girl had a medical history significant for hyperthyroidism, but had clinically displayed euthyroidism for approximately 7 years. She was found unconscious at the bottom of a hill after leaving home on her bicycle without a helmet. There was no witness to the accident. When she was found, the patient was unconscious and gastric contents lay

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Third Eye rear-view mirror * helped relieve some of the claustrophobia associated with the halo device ( Fig. 1 ). Fig. 1. Photograph showing the Third Eye rear-view mirror applied to the halo ring. The small mirror in the Third Eye is easily applied to the halo ring; it does not require equipment modification and is readily available from most bicycle supply stores. The mirror can be removed at night and reapplied during waking hours. We believe that the use of this simple and inexpensive tool may make a patient's term in the halo fixation system more