Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 6,393 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Paul Grabb, Alan Spooner, Wally Wilson and W. Jerry Oakes

T he anatomy and function of the apical ligament (middle odontoid ligament, suspensory ligament), which lies between the alar ligaments and attaches the tip of the odontoid process of the axis to the basion, have infrequently been described, but this ligament has been ascribed a functional role in craniocervical stability by many authors. 5, 7, 8, 11 The purpose of this study was to examine the apical ligament in cadaveric specimens, to determine its exact anatomy, and to attribute a true function to it. It was our goal to prove or disprove the functional

Restricted access

Pierluigi Longatti, Alessandro Fiorindi, Alberto Feletti, Domenico D'Avella and Andrea Martinuzzi

N euroendoscopic anatomy of the fourth ventricle has been reported infrequently in the literature, mainly based on laboratory experiences or, more rarely, in accounts of caudocranial suboccipital surgical approaches. 3 , 4 , 6 , 12 , 16 , 19 Even neurosurgeons familiar with flexible endoscopes have scarcely taken advantage of the extraordinary versatility of their instruments to achieve complete visual control of all the ventricular cavities. 7 Nonetheless, the transaqueductal approach to the fourth ventricle performed with flexible scopes has been

Free access

Alejandro J. Lopez, Justin K. Scheer, Kayla E. Leibl, Zachary A. Smith, Brian J. Dlouhy and Nader S. Dahdaleh

T he craniovertebral junction (CVJ)—defined as the occiput, atlas, and axis—is a complex area that houses vital neural and vascular structures while achieving the most mobility of any segment within the spine. 63 It represents the transition between the brain and cervical spine. The majority of the spine’s rotation, flexion, and extension occur between the occiput, the atlas, and axis. 44 , 53 , 64 The biomechanics of motion and stability at the CVJ are unique at each vertebra and segment. An understanding of the complexities of the CVJ anatomy and

Full access

Joseph S. Cheng and John K. Song

One of the basic tenets of performing surgery is knowledge of the relevant anatomy. Surgeons incorporate this knowledge along with factors, such as biomechanics and physiology, to develop their operative approaches and procedures. In the diagnosis and management of sacral tumors, the need to be familiar with the anatomy of the sacrum is no less important than knowledge of the pathological entity involved. This article will provide an overview of the embryology and anatomy of the sacrum, along with concepts as applied to surgical intervention.

Full access

Karl-Olof Lövblad and Karl Schaller

D ue to advances in neurosurgical operating techniques 28 over the past 2 decades and to have a better understanding of the neuropsychological processes involving the limbic 21 and paralimbic 2 systems, it has become necessary to make use of imaging tools that can on the one hand provide high-resolution 3D data sets and on the other hand also reflect functional anatomy, connectivity, and molecular metabolic processes. This is especially important if one considers the intrinsic gliomatous processes of these areas, which tend to spread along the

Full access

Karl-Olof Lövblad and Karl Schaller

D ue to advances in neurosurgical operating techniques 28 over the past 2 decades and to have a better understanding of the neuropsychological processes involving the limbic 21 and paralimbic 2 systems, it has become necessary to make use of imaging tools that can on the one hand provide high-resolution 3D data sets and on the other hand also reflect functional anatomy, connectivity, and molecular metabolic processes. This is especially important if one considers the intrinsic gliomatous processes of these areas, which tend to spread along the

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Marios Loukas, Mohammadali M. Shoja, Nihal Apaydin, Mohammad R. Ardalan and W. Jerry Oakes

middle age, they become reduced to a single pair, 1 on each side of the SSS. As the lacunae can be encountered surgically, an anatomical study aimed at further elucidating their anatomy, identifying surgical landmarks, and associated quantitation seemed warranted. Materials and Methods Thirty-five adult cadavers (19 male and 16 female, with a mean age of 80 years at death [range 48–90 years]) were fixed in a formalin-phenol-alcohol solution and subjected to a detailed dissection of the calvarial region. With the cadaver supine, the scalp was removed to reveal

Restricted access

Jian Lü and Xianli Zhu

microsurgical anatomy of the interpeduncular cistern. Materials and Methods The interpeduncular cistern was identified and studied in eight Han Chinese adult human cadaveric brains, which had been obtained from persons ranging in age from 22 to 65 years at the time of death. Each brain had an intact dura mater and had been fixed with 10% formalin before removal from the cranial cavity. None of the specimens displayed signs of cerebral diseases on macroscopic examination. The microsurgical dissections were performed with microsurgical instruments and techniques with the

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Tyler Marshall, Marios Loukas, Mohammadali M. Shoja and Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol

flexor digitorum superficialis. Although the sublime bridge is a potential site of median nerve compression, only scattered case reports exist regarding entrapment of this nerve at this site. 5 , 7 , 8 , 10 , 12 F ig . 1. Schematic view of the sublime bridge and associated anatomy including its relationship to the median nerve. To date, no anatomical study has been performed that addresses the sublime bridge or its detailed relationships to the median nerve. The aim of the present study was to elucidate further this potential site of median nerve compression

Restricted access

R. Shane Tubbs, Joshua Dixon, Marios Loukas, Mohammadali M. Shoja and Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol

, Kim WH , Cho YK , Lim MK , Suh CH : MR imaging of the alar ligament: morphologic changes during axial rotation of the head in asymptomatic young adults . Skeletal Radiol 31 : 637 – 642 , 2002 4 Lang J : Craniocervical region, osteology and articulations . Neuro-Orthopedics 1 : 67 – 92 , 1986 5 Lang J : Skull Base and Related Structures: Atlas of Clinical Anatomy Stuttgart , Schattauer , 1995 6 Tubbs RS , Grabb PA , Spooner A , Wilson W , Oakes WJ : The apical ligament: anatomy and functional significance . J