Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 630 items for :

  • "adult spinal deformity" x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Restricted access

Jong-myung Jung, Seung-Jae Hyun, Ki-Jeong Kim, and Tae-Ahn Jahng

, : Major complications and comparison between 3-column osteotomy techniques in 105 consecutive spinal deformity procedures . Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 37 : 1198 – 1210 , 2012 10.1097/BRS.0b013e31824fffde 2 Bae J , Lee SH : Minimally invasive spinal surgery for adult spinal deformity . Neurospine 15 : 18 – 24 , 2018 29656622 10.14245/ns.1836022.011 3 Barton C , Noshchenko A , Patel V , Cain C , Kleck C , Burger E : Risk factors for rod fracture after posterior correction of adult spinal deformity with osteotomy: a retrospective case

Full access

Tatsuya Yasuda, Tomohiko Hasegawa, Yu Yamato, Daisuke Togawa, Sho Kobayashi, Go Yoshida, Tomohiro Banno, Hideyuki Arima, Shin Oe, and Yukihiro Matsuyama

R ecent studies have shown that sagittal spinopelvic alignment, including pelvic position, plays a critical role in the health-related quality of life of patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). 4 , 7 , 12 , 13 Therefore, the goal of corrective surgery for ASD is to achieve and maintain optimal spinopelvic alignment. Lumbar lordosis (LL) is one of the important parameters for optimal sagittal alignment. The achievement of adequate LL is necessary for good results in corrective surgeries in spinal fusion. Additionally, LL is one of the main parameters that

Free access

Griffin R. Baum, Alex S. Ha, Meghan Cerpa, Scott L. Zuckerman, James D. Lin, Richard P. Menger, Joseph A. Osorio, Simon Morr, Eric Leung, Ronald A. Lehman Jr., Zeeshan Sardar, and Lawrence G. Lenke

Previous Presentations This abstract was presented at the Scoliosis Research Society 2019 Annual Meeting, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, September 18–21, 2019. References 1 Schwab F , Patel A , Ungar B , Adult spinal deformity-postoperative standing imbalance: how much can you tolerate? An overview of key parameters in assessing alignment and planning corrective surgery . Spine (Phila Pa 1976) . 2010 ; 35 ( 25 ): 2224 – 2231 . 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181ee6bd4 2 Schwab FJ , Blondel B , Bess S , Radiographical spinopelvic parameters and disability in the

Free access

Mark Ren, Barry R. Bryant, Andrew B. Harris, Khaled M. Kebaish, Lee H. Riley III, David B. Cohen, Richard L. Skolasky, and Brian J. Neuman

use has been suggested as a way to improve postoperative outcomes and to reduce costs. 14 , 15 Reported rates of opioid use before spine surgery range from 34% to 57%. 3 , 12 , 16–19 Adult spinal deformity (ASD), which comprises a group of diseases that have a reported prevalence of up to 68% in adults older than 65 years, 20–23 can impair function, decrease quality of life, and cause severe back and radicular pain. 24 , 25 Patients often seek opioid analgesics and spinal arthrodesis to treat these symptoms, 25 , 26 and the frequency of ASD surgery more than

Free access

Devon J. Ryan, Nicholas D. Stekas, Ethan W. Ayres, Mohamed A. Moawad, Eaman Balouch, Dennis Vasquez-Montes, Charla R. Fischer, Aaron J. Buckland, Thomas J. Errico, and Themistocles S. Protopsaltis

. Drafting the article: Protopsaltis, Ryan, Stekas, Ayres, Balouch, Fischer. Critically revising the article: Protopsaltis, Balouch, Fischer, Errico. Reviewed submitted version of manuscript: Protopsaltis. References 1 Ames CP , Scheer JK , Lafage V , . Adult spinal deformity: epidemiology, health impact, evaluation, and management . Spine Deform . 2016 ; 4 ( 4 ): 310 – 322 . 27927522 10.1016/j.jspd.2015.12.009 2 Pérennou D , Marcelli C , Hérisson C , Simon L . Adult lumbar scoliosis. epidemiologic aspects in a low-back pain population

Restricted access

Takayoshi Shimizu, Meghan Cerpa, and Lawrence G. Lenke

I n patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD), the center of gravity (CoG) in the sagittal plane typically shifts forward due to the loss of lumbar lordosis (LL). In order to keep an upright position, these patients need to maintain their CoG on the gravity line, which is consistently located around the center of the ankle, 1 by mobilizing compensatory mechanisms, i.e., lordosing of residual mobile spinal segments, pelvic retroversion, and ultimately recruiting lower extremities (LEs). 2 With the advent of full-body radiographs, recent studies have, in

Restricted access

Takayoshi Shimizu, Meghan Cerpa, and Lawrence G. Lenke

I n patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD), the center of gravity (CoG) in the sagittal plane typically shifts forward due to the loss of lumbar lordosis (LL). In order to keep an upright position, these patients need to maintain their CoG on the gravity line, which is consistently located around the center of the ankle, 1 by mobilizing compensatory mechanisms, i.e., lordosing of residual mobile spinal segments, pelvic retroversion, and ultimately recruiting lower extremities (LEs). 2 With the advent of full-body radiographs, recent studies have, in

Free access

Yoji Ogura, Jeffrey L. Gum, Alex Soroceanu, Alan H. Daniels, Breton Line, Themistocles Protopsaltis, Richard A. Hostin, Peter G. Passias, Douglas C. Burton, Justin S. Smith, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Renaud Lafage, Eric O. Klineberg, Han Jo Kim, Andrew Harris, Khaled Kebaish, Frank Schwab, Shay Bess, Christopher P. Ames, Leah Y. Carreon, and the International Spine Study Group (ISSG)

S hared decision-making (SDM) is gaining momentum in the current era of patient-centered care. SDM is defined as a process in which patients and physicians mutually engage to determine the best treatment. 1 SDM improves patient satisfaction and quality of life, and reduces decisional conflict and patients’ anxiety. 2 , 3 SDM is particularly important when there are no obvious “best” treatment options. This is typically the case for adult spinal deformity (ASD), because a gold standard has not been established in the management of this disease. Furthermore

Free access

Emily K. Miller, Brian J. Neuman, Amit Jain, Alan H. Daniels, Tamir Ailon, Daniel M. Sciubba, Khaled M. Kebaish, Virginie Lafage, Justin K. Scheer, Justin S. Smith, Shay Bess, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Christopher P. Ames, and the International Spine Study Group

predict mortality and self-management ability in nonoperatively treated populations, these indices have recently been shown to be better predictors of perioperative adverse events than chronological age alone. 6 , 11 , 12 , 17 Numerous methods for frailty quantification have been developed and validated. 3 , 4 , 7 , 13 , 15–18 Searle et al. proposed and validated a method for creating frailty indices by using large, existing patient databases. This step-by-step method was used to create a frailty index (the adult spinal deformity frailty index [ASD-FI]) in this study

Restricted access

Andrew K. Chan, Robert K. Eastlack, Richard G. Fessler, Khoi D. Than, Dean Chou, Kai-Ming Fu, Paul Park, Michael Y. Wang, Adam S. Kanter, David O. Okonkwo, Pierce D. Nunley, Neel Anand, Juan S. Uribe, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Shay Bess, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Vivian P. Le, Praveen V. Mummaneni, and

B oth traditional open and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques may be implemented for the treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD). 1–4 Both techniques may satisfactorily achieve the goals of treating sagittal and coronal plane imbalance, instability, and neural compression. 1 , 5 , 6 Because traditional open surgery for ASD has been associated with substantial morbidity, 7–10 a number of surgeons have increasingly applied MIS techniques in ASD treatment, 11–13 demonstrating both clinical and radiographic improvement with long-term follow