Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 240 items for :

  • "adjunct therapy" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Charles W. Elkins and Juan E. Fonseca

consideration as it is in children. However, if it occurs in younger patients, this problem might be solved by reopening the central incision and inserting another segment of tubing, using available connectors. CONSIDERATION OF CASES We have performed a palliative shunting procedure either with or without exploration of the probable site of the lesion on 15 occasions in the past 3 years. These cases are diversified in type and are presented in Table 1 . TABLE 1 Name Diagnosis and Adjunct Therapy Type of Shunt Complications Duration

Restricted access

John P. Allen, David M. Cook, Monte A. Greer, Harold Paxton and Albert Castro

chromophobe adenoma was removed by curettage through a bifrontal craniotomy, and Case 4 was treated by bifrontal craniotomy and pituitary curettage for a nonfunctioning pituitary chromophobe adenoma. The third non-acromegalic patient (Case 5) had an elective transnasal hypophysectomy for metastatic carcinoma of the prostate. He had received 20 mg of prednisone and 1 mg of stilbestrol daily as adjunctive therapy for his malignancy prior to surgery. The two acromegalic patients are described more fully below. Case Reports Case 1 A 57-year-old man with acromegaly

Restricted access

Immunobiology of primary intracranial tumors

Part 1: Studies of the cellular and humoral general immune competence of brain-tumor patients

M. Stephen Mahaley Jr., William H. Brooks, Thomas L. Roszman, Darell D. Bigner, Lynn Dudka and Sheila Richardson

. Fig. 3. Graph showing serial lymphocyte counts, serum influenza and tetanus AB titers, and serum IgM levels of a patient with an anaplastic astrocytoma who remained stable neurologically after the 8-month follow-up study. Fig. 4. Graph showing serial lymphocyte counts, serum influenza and tetanus AB titers, and serum IgM levels of a patient with a meningioma who received no postoperative adjunctive therapy and who is doing well more than 10 months postoperatively. Inasmuch as patients with glioblastoma seemed to have the lowest DHR responses and

Restricted access

Immunobiology of primary intracranial tumors

Part 2: The evaluation of chemotherapy and immunotherapy protocols using the avian sarcoma virus glioma model

M. Stephen Mahaley Jr., Robert E. Gentry and Darell D. Bigner

W hile some progress is being made toward improved survival times of patients with anaplastic glioma treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 32–34 most adjunctive therapy protocols for brain tumors have been selected on an empirical basis or have been chosen from results of animal tumor models bearing no resemblance to human brain tumors. 20, 27 A suitable brain tumor model should consist of readily inducible autochthonous tumors with reasonable induction times, predictable host survival times, and neoplasms that are histologically similar to human

Restricted access

Stephen J. Haines

craniopharyngioma before and after the introduction of steroids as adjunctive therapy. Such comparisons are frequently made, however, but in an informal way which makes them difficult to pinpoint as examples. The case for historical controls has been forcefully stated by Gehan and Freireich, 22 and Pocock. 35 The example which follows, however, meets their most stringent criteria for historical controls, and demonstrates the danger of the technique. Byar, et al., 8 cited the Veterans Administration Co-operative Urological Research Group study on prostatic carcinoma. 47

Restricted access

Immunobiology of primary intracranial tumors

Part 4: Levamisole as an immune stimulant in patients and in the ASV glioma model

M. Stephen Mahaley Jr., Paul Steinbok, Patricia Aronin, Lynn Dudka and Doug Zinn

clinical trials and studies with the ASV model have influenced our initiation at this time of a pilot, Phase I, clinical study that will include active immunotherapy in addition to the inclusion of an immune adjuvant and immunostimulation ( Fig. 7 ). Thus, it will not be a definitive randomized study for immunotherapy but is intended to be an initial effort to expand the potential role of immunotherapy in the treatment of malignant glioma in the human. We will determine ho well this adjunctive therapy is tolerated, and will observe statistically, in a less precise manner

Restricted access

Michael L. J. Apuzzo and Malcolm S. Mitchell

universal standards of evaluation. Current opinion holds that modulation of the immune system will be most effective as adjunctive therapy after cytoreductive therapy by surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Under these circumstances, tumor burden can be reduced to a minimum, and thus increase the efficiency of the immune system against the tumor and the likelihood of a cure. Future Perspectives If immunotherapy is to be utilized to its maximum potential, clarification of fundamental issues related to immune mechanisms in glioma-bearing patients is of paramount

Restricted access

Judith A. Murovic, James P. Ongley, Joseph C. Parker Jr. and Larry K. Page

✓ A 20-month-old patient with a paraventricular and parapineal yolk-sac tumor was treated with subtotal excision and total neuraxis irradiation. She has done well in the 3½ years since surgery. A comparative review of similar pineal and gonadal yolk-sac tumors suggests a role for surgery combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additional experience with these unusual germ-cell neoplasms should establish the need for aggressive extirpation, not only to determine the exact diagnosis, but also to provide the basis for subsequent adjunctive therapy. The latter may include specific combinations of antineoplastic drugs in addition to radiation.

Restricted access

David S. Baskin, James E. Boggan and Charles B. Wilson

related to hypothalamic radionecrosis. Linfoot 39 reported a lower incidence of postirradiation morbidity in patients treated with heavy-particle radiation, and noted that the complications occurred only in patients who received therapy involving the Bragg peak effect and in those who had undergone prior irradiation by conventional photon techniques. Medical Therapy Medical therapy using bromocriptine has assumed a limited role in the adjunctive therapy of patients with pituitary tumors. 6 In the largest reported study to date, in which acromegalic patients

Restricted access

Dénes Áfra, Bela Kocsis, Jozsef Dobay and Sándor Eckhardt

combination of CCNU, VM-26, and procarbazine 12 in the treatment of supratentorial gliomas. The adjuvant chemotherapy improved survival times only slightly; it proved to be more effective if chemotherapy was given at the time of recurrence. In a prospective, randomized trial, Walker, et al. , 16 compared BCNU and Me-CCNU as adjunctive therapy with irradiation versus radiotherapy alone. Neither drug significantly improved the median survival times of malignant glioma patients (51 and 42 weeks compared with 36 weeks for radiotherapy alone); however, the number of longer