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Robert M. Crowell and Yngve Olsson

M icrosurgical suture anastomosis of the superficial temporal artery (STA) to a branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is a low-risk procedure for restoring blood flow to the cerebrum after internal carotid or middle cerebral artery occlusion. 16, 18 This procedure has not yet been attempted in cases of acute stroke, but preliminary data from the laboratory 2 and the clinic 16, 18 suggest that after MCA occlusion prompt revascularization may be followed by returning neurological function with minimal structural damage. Can STA-MCA anastomosis done

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M. Peter Heilbrun, O. Howard Reichman, Robert E. Anderson and Theodore S. Roberts

A nastomosis of the superficial temporal artery to the middle cerebral artery cortical branches (STA-MCA) is a useful procedure for providing additional channels of collateral circulation to the brain. It has been demonstrated that these new channels will remain patent and will also enlarge with time. 6, 9 This procedure has been used in the treatment of patients with cerebrovascular disease presenting as transient ischemic attacks (TIA), completed strokes followed by incomplete resolution which has been termed reversible ischemic neurological deficit (RIND

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hydatid disease Werner L. Apt Juan L. Fierro Ciro Calderón Carlos Pérez Patricio Mujica January 1976 44 1 72 76 10.3171/jns.1976.44.1.0072 Compound elevated fractures of the skull Bruce Lawrence Ralston January 1976 44 1 77 79 10.3171/jns.1976.44.1.0077 Retained intracranial metallic foreign bodies Kenneth Ott Edward Tarlov Robert Crowell Nikolas Papadakis January 1976 44 1 80 83 10.3171/jns.1976.44.1.0080 Spontaneous cerebral revascularization in a patient with STA-MCA anastomosis James I

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James I. Ausman, James Moore and Shelley N. Chou

C erebral revascularization is presently being evaluated in a number of centers throughout the world as a means of providing additional blood flow to the brain. 1, 2, 4, 5 Basically, an extracranial artery is anastomosed microscopically to a cortical vessel through a craniectomy. Usually the cranial defect is repaired by replacement of the original bone or by acrylic cranioplasty. We are reporting a case in which left superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis was performed without repair of the cranial defect. Angiography 5

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Wayne S. Paullus, T. Glenn Pait and Albert L. Rhoton Jr.

14 have also reported using saphenous vein bypass grafts for lesions proximal to the middle cerebral artery, because they could provide sufficient flow to supply both hemispheres and the posterior fossa contents, and the flow is anterograde and more physiological than the retrograde flow with superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis. Even though the venous bypass graft to the supraclinoid carotid has these theoretical advantages over the STA-MCA anastomosis, the associated morbidity, the disadvantage of requiring occlusion of collateral

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tomography Mark L. Rosenblum Julian T. Hoff David Norman Philip R. Weinstein Lawrence Pitts November 1978 49 5 658 668 10.3171/jns.1978.49.5.0658 Microsurgical relationships of the superior cerebellar artery and the trigeminal nerve David G. Hardy Albert L. Rhoton Jr. November 1978 49 5 669 678 10.3171/jns.1978.49.5.0669 Treatment of moyamoya disease with STA-MCA anastomosis Jun Karasawa Haruhiko Kikuchi Seiji Furuse Junichiro Kawamura Toshisuke Sakaki November 1978 49 5 679 688 10

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Albert Ly-young Shen

T he treatment of carotid-cavernous fistulas remains a controversial problem. This report is of a case in which the usual procedures for treatment were considered too hazardous because of pre-existing occlusion of the contralateral carotid artery. Some form of therapy was felt necessary because the patient was rapidly losing vision in both eyes. To circumvent the potentially catastrophic problems associated with bilateral carotid artery occlusion, bilateral superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomoses were performed. The

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Jun Karasawa, Haruhiko Kikuchi, Seiji Furuse, Junichiro Kawamura and Toshisuke Sakaki

three adults), underwent STA-MCA anastomosis and/or encephalomyosynangiosis (EMS) 2 at Kitano Hospital. Their clinical features are summarized in Table 1 . Of the juvenile patients (Cases 1 to 10), two had transient ischemic attacks (TIA's) (Cases 3 and 10), three had TIA's followed by stroke (Cases 6, 8, and 9), one had reversible neurological deficits (RIND) followed by stroke (Case 1), and one had a stroke alone (Case 2). Three patients (Cases 4, 5, and 7) suffered initially from a stroke, and after complete or nearly complete recovery during the next 6 to 12

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artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis Paul Steinbok Kenneth Berry Clarisse L. Dolman March 1979 50 3 377 381 10.3171/jns.1979.50.3.0377 Failure of pyramidal tract decussation in the Dandy-Walker syndrome Raymond L. Lagger March 1979 50 3 382 387 10.3171/jns.1979.50.3.0382 Swan-neck deformity secondary to osteomyelitis of the posterior elements of the cervical spine Ghaus M. Malik Alvin H. Crawford Robert Halter March 1979 50 3 388 390 10.3171/jns.1979.50.3.0388 Percutaneous restoration of a kinked shunt Stephen E

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Paul Steinbok, Kenneth Berry and Clarisse L. Dolman

S ince the first published reports of bypass surgery in humans for intracranial vascular occlusive disease by Yaşargil, et al., in 1970, 21 there have been an estimated 1000 such operations performed. 5 Discussions of the techniques, indications, results, and assessment of patency of anastomosis have been the subject of a number of international symposia as well as a large number of publications. 2, 14, 16 While the vast majority of such operations are superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomoses for transient ischemic