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Erica F. Bisson, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Michael S. Virk, John Knightly, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Anshit Goyal, Andrew K. Chan, Jian Guan, Steven Glassman, Kevin Foley, Jonathan R. Slotkin, Eric A. Potts, Mark E. Shaffrey, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Regis W. Haid Jr., Kai-Ming Fu, Michael Y. Wang, Paul Park, Anthony L. Asher and Mohamad Bydon

–20 Nevertheless, OL is still considered to be an effective procedure; it is widely performed and has been shown to have optimal long-term outcomes. As MIS techniques are increasingly adapted, it is important to investigate their outcomes in comparison to conventional open techniques. In the current study we used a prospective national registry to compare clinical and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) between open and minimally invasive decompression among patients with grade I spondylolisthesis. Methods Study Cohort For the present study, the Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) was

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Anthony M. DiGiorgio, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Paul Park, Andrew K. Chan, Erica F. Bisson, Mohamad Bydon, Kevin T. Foley, Steven D. Glassman, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Eric A. Potts, Mark E. Shaffrey, Domagoj Coric, John J. Knightly, Michael Y. Wang, Kai-Ming Fu, Anthony L. Asher, Michael S. Virk, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Jian Guan, Regis W. Haid Jr. and Jonathan R. Slotkin

, Chotai S , Parker SL , Bydon M , : An analysis from the Quality Outcomes Database, Part 2. Predictive model for return to work after elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease . J Neurosurg Spine 27 : 370 – 381 , 2017 3 Asher AL , Kerezoudis P , Mummaneni PV , Bisson EF , Glassman SD , Foley KT , : Defining the minimum clinically important difference for grade I degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: insights from the Quality Outcomes Database . Neurosurg Focus 44 ( 1 ): E2 , 2018 4 Chan AK , Bisson EF , Bydon M

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Anthony L. Asher, Clinton J. Devin, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Hui Nian, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Inamullah Khan, Ahilan Sivaganesan, Frank E. Harrell Jr., Kristin R. Archer and Mohamad Bydon

clinical spine registries, such as the Quality Outcomes Database and the International Spine Study Group for adult spinal deformity, have emerged as important tools in the physician’s armamentarium to measure, report, and promote healthcare quality. 1 , 2 , 11 , 27 The majority of the work on patient satisfaction thus far has been spearheaded in lumbar spine surgery, given the pervasive prevalence of degenerative lumbar conditions compared to their cervical counterparts. 6 , 15 , 19 , 20 , 22 , 26 , 28 , 33 As such, there is limited literature on this topic for the

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Andrew K. Chan, Erica F. Bisson, Mohamad Bydon, Steven D. Glassman, Kevin T. Foley, Eric A. Potts, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Mark E. Shaffrey, Domagoj Coric, John J. Knightly, Paul Park, Michael Y. Wang, Kai-Ming Fu, Jonathan R. Slotkin, Anthony L. Asher, Michael S. Virk, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Silky Chotai, Anthony M. DiGiorgio, Regis W. Haid and Praveen V. Mummaneni

, and nonuniform surgical techniques. Indeed, results pulled from randomized clinical trials may be difficult to generalize due to the stringent inclusion criteria used in those studies. Where trials fall short in the ability to capture the variability of “real-world” spine surgery practice, prospective registry data fill in the knowledge gap of a wide range of practice patterns. The AANS launched the Quality Outcomes Database (QOD), a prospective longitudinal registry that includes demographic, clinical, and patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to measure the safety

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Praveen V. Mummaneni, Erica F. Bisson, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Steven Glassman, Kevin Foley, Jonathan R. Slotkin, Eric Potts, Mark Shaffrey, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Domagoj Coric, John Knightly, Paul Park, Kai-Ming Fu, Clinton J. Devin, Silky Chotai, Andrew K. Chan, Michael Virk, Anthony L. Asher and Mohamad Bydon

regard to the efficacy of open versus minimally invasive fusion for spondylolisthesis. 2 , 9 , 10 , 13 , 19 , 20 , 22–24 Moreover, these studies are limited by their single-institution nature, thereby reflecting the experience of relatively few (1–4) surgeons. In light of the limitations in the current literature, we conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data in a multiinstitutional spine registry that represents a real-world spinal practice comprising academic and private institutions. Methods Data Source We queried the Quality Outcomes

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Praveen V. Mummaneni, Mohamad Bydon, John Knightly, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Anshit Goyal, Andrew K. Chan, Jian Guan, Michael Biase, Andrea Strauss, Steven Glassman, Kevin T. Foley, Jonathan R. Slotkin, Eric Potts, Mark Shaffrey, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Regis W. Haid Jr., Kai-Ming Fu, Michael Y. Wang, Paul Park, Anthony L. Asher and Erica F. Bisson

predictors of a nonroutine discharge for a homogeneous subset of patients undergoing 1- to 2-level decompression or 1-level fusion surgery for grade I spondylolisthesis. Methods Patient Cohort The Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) was queried for patients undergoing surgery for Meyerding grade I degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2016. The QOD spine registry is the largest prospective multiinstitutional registry in North America. The registry was established in 2012; the overarching objective behind its inception was to assess risk

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Anthony L. Asher, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Erica F. Bisson, Steven D. Glassman, Kevin T. Foley, Jonathan R. Slotkin, Eric A. Potts, Mark E. Shaffrey, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Domagoj Coric, John J. Knightly, Paul Park, Kai-Ming Fu, Clinton J. Devin, Kristin R. Archer, Silky Chotai, Andrew K. Chan, Michael S. Virk and Mohamad Bydon

spinal stenosis, 25 pseudarthrosis, 22 adjacent-segment disease, 16 and spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome. 24 However, literature on the MCID for patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis is scarce, and most of the published studies are limited by their single-institution nature and small sample size. In light of this knowledge gap, we sought to determine the MCID values of functional outcomes in patients who underwent surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods Data Source We queried the Quality Outcomes Database (QOD

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Andrew K. Chan, Erica F. Bisson, Mohamad Bydon, Steven D. Glassman, Kevin T. Foley, Eric A. Potts, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Mark E. Shaffrey, Domagoj Coric, John J. Knightly, Paul Park, Kai-Ming Fu, Jonathan R. Slotkin, Anthony L. Asher, Michael S. Virk, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Silky Chotai, Anthony M. DiGiorgio, Alvin Y. Chan, Regis W. Haid and Praveen V. Mummaneni

data from 11 sites participating in the prospective, multicenter, multidisciplinary Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) to identify factors associated with the most and the least satisfaction following surgery for grade 1 degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods The QOD is a prospective longitudinal registry that includes demographic, clinical, and PRO data to measure the safety and quality of neurosurgical procedures, including spinal surgery. The QOD was established with the aim of evaluating risk-adjusted expected morbidity and surgical outcomes to improve care

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Clinton J. Devin, Mohamad Bydon, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Inamullah Khan, Ahilan Sivaganesan, Matthew J. McGirt, Kristin R. Archer, Kevin T. Foley, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Erica F. Bisson, John J. Knightly, Christopher I. Shaffrey and Anthony L. Asher

various demographic, occupation-related, and clinical variables in determining the probability of return to work after cervical spine surgery. To address this knowledge gap, this study used data from a national spine registry to construct a predictive model as well as a nomogram to predict return to work after cervical spine surgery among patients who were employed preoperatively. Methods Data Source For this project, we queried the cervical spine module of the Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) registry. The QOD is a prospective registry that was designed to evaluate risk

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Praveen V. Mummaneni, Mohamad Bydon, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Andrew K. Chan, Steven D. Glassman, Kevin T. Foley, Eric A. Potts, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Mark E. Shaffrey, Domagoj Coric, John J. Knightly, Paul Park, Michael Y. Wang, Kai-Ming Fu, Jonathan R. Slotkin, Anthony L. Asher, Michael S. Virk, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Jian Guan, Regis W. Haid and Erica F. Bisson

improvement initiatives in recent years due to the high prevalence and also the billions of dollars in direct and indirect cost associated with treating low-back pain. 30 , 36 , 38 In the current study, we queried a prospectively maintained multiinstitutional spine registry to construct a predictive model for long-term patient satisfaction by using demographic, clinical, and operative factors obtained in patients undergoing surgery for grade I lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods Cohort We queried the Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) for patients undergoing surgery for