Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,116 items for :

  • "Parkinson's disease" x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Restricted access

Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor Paolo Ferroli , M.D. Angelo Franzini , M.D. Carlo Marras , M.D. Giovanni Broggi , M.D. Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta Milan, Italy 641 643 Abstract Object. A blinded evaluation of the effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation was performed in levodopa-intolerant patients with Parkinson disease (PD). These patients (Group I, seven patients) were moderately or severely disabled (Hoehn and

Restricted access

Oleg Kopyov, Deane Jacques, Christopher Duma, Galen Buckwalter, Alex Kopyov, Abraham Lieberman, and Brian Copcutt

L esioning of the globus pallidus ([GP], pallidotomy) is a well-known approach for treatment of the motor dysfunctions that accompany Parkinson's disease, particularly tremor, dyskinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait freezing. Whereas the first line of treatment for Parkinson's disease is pharmacological replacement of missing dopamine with drugs such as levodopa, 5 the dosage and effects do not remain stable over time. After a number of years of taking levodopa, patients begin to experience fluctuations in its effectiveness, until their Parkinson

Restricted access

Tetsuo Yokoyama, Yoko Imamura, Kenji Sugiyama, Shigeru Nishizawa, Naoki Yokota, Seiji Ohta, and Kenichi Uemura

N europsychological studies have demonstrated that Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with various cognitive deficits, ultimately leading to the development of dementia in approximately 30% of patients. 1 These deficits have been reported to be detected even during the early stage of PD 17, 24, 25, 33 and are thought to be derived from disturbance of frontobasal ganglia circuits. 29, 33, 34, 38, 39 Many authors have reported that posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP) effectively alleviates rigidity, bradykinesia, and tremor and has therefore become a common

Restricted access

Douglas Kondziolka, Eugene Bonaroti, Susan Baser, Fran Brandt, Young Soo Kim, and L. Dade Lunsford

surgery  lt 39  rt 19 Hoehn & Yahr stage (range)  on-period median 3 (3–5)  off-period median 4 (3–5) total levodopa equivalents (mg/day)  mean dose 767.3  range 175–1550 duration of PD (yrs) 13.3 ± 5.4  range 6–35 Patients were evaluated by the movement disorder neurologist before surgery and at 2-, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-months postsurgery. Patients were evaluated serially by using three techniques: 1) the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS); 12 2) a mini mental state examination; and 3) videotaping in on and off states. The mini mental state examination

Restricted access

Lauri V. Laitinen, A. Tommy Bergenheim, and Marwan I. Hariz

I n the late 1930's, Russell Meyers 20 began to perform open surgical interventions in the caudate nucleus, the basal ganglia, and the ansa lenticularis for the treatment of extrapyramidal diseases. The introduction of human stereotactic surgery in 1947 by Spiegel, et al. , 27 stimulated some neurosurgeons to apply the new technique to the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In 1950, Talairach, et al. , 31 described the effects of stereotactic surgery on extrapyramidal disorders. In 1953, Narabayashi and Okuma 21 published their first case of chemical

Restricted access

10.3171/jns.2005.102.2.0401 Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor John T. Slevin , M.D. Greg A. Gerhardt , Ph.D. Charles D. Smith , M.D. Don M. Gash , Ph.D. Richard Kryscio , Ph.D. Byron Young , M.D. Morris K. Udall Parkinson Disease Research Center of Excellence University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center Lexington, Kentucky 401 401 Abstract Object. Glial cell

Restricted access

Juan J. López-Lozano, Begoña Brera, Javier Abascal, and Gonzalo Bravo

T he encouraging results obtained by several groups 2, 4, 6 after transplantation of autologous adrenal medulla into the caudate nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease seem to indicate the value of this technique as an alternative treatment of this disorder. However, while there is generally an improvement in the signs and symptoms of parkinsonism, Drucker-Colín, et al. , 3 Molina, et al. (personal communication, 1987), Jiao, et al. , 4 and López-Lozano and Bravo (unpublished data) noted that some patients present transient episodes of confusion

Restricted access

Jamal M. Taha, Jacques Favre, Thomas K. Baumann, and Kim J. Burchiel

T halamotomy has been the preferred surgical treatment for parkinsonian tremor for the past 30 years. 3, 8, 10 Tremor is abolished in 86 to 95% of patients with Parkinson's disease after this procedure; 3, 8, 12, 16 however, the effects of thalamotomy on other symptoms of Parkinson's disease (that is, bradykinesia, rigidity, dystonia, drug-induced dyskinesia, and on—off fluctuations) have been inconsistent. 3, 8 For amelioration of the latter symptoms, posteroventral pallidotomy has proved to be a more effective surgery. 2, 5, 9, 11, 14 Currently

Restricted access

Alois A. Obwegeser, Ryan J. Uitti, John A. Lucas, Robert J. Witte, Margaret F. Turk, and Robert E. Wharen Jr.

, Beric A, et al: Pallidal targeting with the COMPASS system. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 69: 69–72, 1997 2. Baron MS , Vitek JL , Bakay RAE , et al : Treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease by posterior GPi pallidotomy: 1-year results of a pilot study. Ann Neurol 40 : 355 – 366 , 1996 Baron MS, Vitek JL, Bakay RAE, et al: Treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease by posterior GPi pallidotomy: 1-year results of a pilot study. Ann Neurol 40: 355–366, 1996 3. Benton AL , Hamsher KD : Multilingual Aphasia Examination. Iowa City : AJA Associates

Restricted access

Mark W. Fox, J. Eric Ahlskog, and Patrick J. Kelly

techniques. Unfortunately, not all patients with Parkinson's disease experience an optimum response to medications. 5, 23, 30, 39, 58 Consequently, there remains a role for surgical treatment of parkinsonian tremor. 11, 22, 28 Stereotactic operative techniques have improved significantly during the last decade due both to improved instrumentation and methods for electrophysiological monitoring, and to the introduction of computerized tomography (CT). Indeed, modern CT-based stereotactic procedures have altered the neurosurgical management of many intracranial conditions