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Jeremy C. T. Fairbank

T he purpose of this short article is to update readers on the current status of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The ODI was first published 33 years ago. 3 It has been extraordinarily successful. Many questionnaires are developed; some are published, and most are forgotten. The journey of the ODI has coincided with my professional career, and this has been important in its development and the protection of its integrity. It took 4 years to develop the ODI before publication, and my coauthors and I did our best, according to the knowledge and

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Mladen Djurasovic, Steven D. Glassman, John R. Dimar II, Charles H. Crawford III, Kelly R. Bratcher and Leah Y. Carreon

: Minimum clinically important difference in lumbar spine surgery patients: a choice of methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire Short Form 36, and pain scales . Spine J 8 : 968 – 974 , 2008 4 Fairbank JCT , Pynsent PB : The Oswestry Disability Index . Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 25 : 2940 – 2952 , 2000 5 Glassman S , Gornet MF , Branch C , Polly D Jr , Peloza J , Schwender JD , : MOS short form 36 and Oswestry Disability Index outcomes in lumbar fusion: a multicenter experience . Spine J 6 : 21

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Harel Deutsch

. Spine 34 : 1066 – 1077 , 2009 4 Copay AG , Glassman SD , Subach BR , Berven S , Schuler TC , Carreon LY : Minimum clinically important difference in lumbar spine surgery patients: a choice of methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire Short Form 36, and pain scales . Spine J 8 : 968 – 974 , 2008 5 Geisler FH , Guyer RD , Blumenthal SL , McAfee PC , Cappuccino A , Bitan F , : Patient selection for lumbar arthroplasty and arthrodesis: the effect of revision surgery in a controlled

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Timothy J. Yee, Brandon W. Smith, Jacob R. Joseph, Yamaan S. Saadeh, Jay K. Nathan, Elyne N. Kahn, Siri S. Khalsa, Kelsey J. Fearer, Michael J. Kirsch, David R. Nerenz, Victor Chang, Jason M. Schwalb, Muwaffak M. Abdulhak and Paul Park

I ncreasing attention has been paid to patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in spine surgery. 14 , 18 , 19 Among the various instruments developed to assess pain and disability due to spinal pathology, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) has been one of the most commonly utilized since its emergence in the 1980s. 8 , 9 , 20 Despite the questionnaire’s near ubiquity in preoperative and postoperative evaluations for patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery, its completion requires considerable time and effort. 3 , 16 The impetus to reduce patient and administrative

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Anthony L. Asher, Silky Chotai, Clinton J. Devin, Theodore Speroff, Frank E. Harrell Jr., Hui Nian, Robert S. Dittus, Praveen V. Mummaneni, John J. Knightly, Steven D. Glassman, Mohamad Bydon, Kristin R. Archer, Kevin T. Foley and Matthew J. McGirt

. 25 , 32 , 39 , 43 Given the logistical challenges and financial restraints of collecting long-term patient-reported data at a scalable level, it is vital to understand how well short-term outcomes represent long-term outcomes for both patient populations and individual patients. In this analysis, we used a large national spine care outcomes database to help determine whether 3-month Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores can be used as a reliable proxy for long-term (i.e., 12-month) follow-up status in the identification of effective versus noneffective care for

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Jeffrey L. Gum, Steven D. Glassman and Leah Y. Carreon

H ealth -related quality of life (HRQOL) measures have become the mainstay for outcome appraisal in spine surgery over the past two decades. Commonly used, validated, and reliable HRQOL measures include the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), 12 , 26 Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), 7 , 9 and visual analog scales or numeric rating scales for back and leg pain. 17 The definition of improvement has evolved concepts such as minimal clinically important difference (MCID) 6 and substantial clinical benefit, 11 which represent

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Jeremy C. T. Fairbank

-level degenerative changes in patients with single-level disease treated using lumbar total disc replacement with ProDisc-L versus circumferential fusion. Clinical article. J Neurosurg Spine 17: 504–511, December 2012). What I do not welcome is the use of the term “Oswestry Disability Index” (ODI) in relation to the outcome measure used in this study. “ODI” is used without any references at all in the paper on adjacent-level changes, 10 nor are there any references in that paper to the main 5-year outcome paper, 9 which precedes it, so the reader may be forgiven for believing

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Anthony L. Asher

TO THE EDITOR: We appreciate the publication of our article, “Inadequacy of 3-month Oswestry Disability Index outcome for assessing individual longer-term patient experience after lumbar spine surgery” ( J Neurosurg Spine [epub ahead of print March 18, 2016; DOI: 10.3171/2015.11.SPINE15872]). On viewing the paper online, however, we noted that one of the departmental affiliations was incorrectly listed as “Orthopedics Surgery” when it should have been “Orthopaedic Surgery,” and Dr. Kristin Archer was listed as having only one affiliation when in fact she

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Taemin Oh, Justin K. Scheer, Justin S. Smith, Richard Hostin, Chessie Robinson, Jeffrey L. Gum, Frank Schwab, Robert A. Hart, Virginie Lafage, Douglas C. Burton, Shay Bess, Themistocles Protopsaltis, Eric O. Klineberg, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Christopher P. Ames and the International Spine Study Group

, 27 , 40 However, no study to date has successfully combined these 2 findings to show that patients who are likely to demonstrate improvements in HRQOL measures also have greater improvements in QALYs. Thus, the primary goal of this study was to develop and internally validate a preoperative, predictive model to identify which patients will reach a 2-year MCID for the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and to subsequently apply this model to demonstrate that these patients achieve greater QALY improvements at 2-year follow-up from surgery. By establishing such a

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Marcus D. Mazur, Sara McEvoy, Meic H. Schmidt and Erica F. Bisson

who completed an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire before their consultation and a patient satisfaction survey after their clinic appointment. Patients were mailed the ODI questionnaire 1 week prior to their clinic appointment and were asked to bring the completed questionnaire to their appointment. Patients who forgot their ODI questionnaires were asked to complete one when they checked in on the day of their clinic appointment. Satisfaction surveys were sent by mail approximately 1 week after the clinic appointment, and these were returned via postage