Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 253 items for :

  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Spinal fractures in the setting of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis conservatively treated via orthosis: illustrative cases

Ayman W. Taher, Paul S. Page, Garret P. Greeneway, Simon Ammanuel, Katherine M. Bunch, Lars Meisner, Amgad Hanna, and Darnell Josiah

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier disease, is a type of noninflammatory arthritis principally characterized by excessive calcification of soft tissue in the spine resulting in gradual ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligaments and entheses. 1–3 Hyperostosis of the spine was initially described by Forestier and Rotes-Querol in 1950, the disease was then further characterized and defined as DISH by Resnick et al. 1 , 2 Diagnostic criteria for DISH includes the presence of calcification and ossification in the

Free access

Outcomes following conservative treatment of extension fractures in the setting of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: is external orthosis alone a reasonable option?

Paul S. Page, Garret P. Greeneway, Wendell B. Lake, Nathaniel P. Brooks, Darnell T. Josiah, Amgad S. Hanna, and Daniel K. Resnick

D iffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a common skeletal disorder in which an abundance of bone is formed along the anterior longitudinal ligament, leading to segmental fusion. 1 This condition was first described by Forestier and Rotes-Querol in 1950 and further defined by Resnick et al. in 1975. 2 , 3 This condition leads to progressive segmental fusion of the spine, resulting in pain, stiffness, and dysphagia in the cervical spine. Despite inappropriate bone formation, quantitative CT studies have shown no increase in bone mineral density

Free access

Negative impact of short-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion in patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis extending to the lumbar segment

Hideaki Nakajima, Kazuya Honjoh, Shuji Watanabe, Arisa Kubota, and Akihiko Matsumine

D iffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a noninflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by calcification and ossification of connective tissues especially in the spinal region (e.g., entheses and ligaments). DISH is not uncommon; a population-based cohort study in Japan showed a prevalence of 10.8% (males 22.0%, females 4.8%) and a significantly higher prevalence in older people (72.3 years) than in younger subjects (64.4 years). 1 The pathological process appears first in the lower thoracic area and then spreads to the upper

Restricted access

Cervical myelopathy in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Case report

Michael T. Stechison and Charles H. Tator

D iffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a disorder affecting both the vertebral column and the extra-axial skeleton, and is characterized by ossification of ligaments, with hyperostosis at their points of attachment to bone. 5, 7, 8 The association of neurological symptomatology is unusual. 7 This report describes a patient with DISH who developed cervical myelopathy. The cause was a unilateral, focal fibrous mass with calcification in the ligamentum flavum and its laminar attachment. This patient had no underlying medical condition other than

Free access

Posterior spinal fixation using penetrating endplate screws in patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis–related thoracolumbar fractures

Takahisa Hishiya, Tetsuhiro Ishikawa, and Mitsutoshi Ota

D iffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a noninflammatory skeletal disease characterized by calcification and ossification of ligaments and entheses. 1 Resnick et al. defined DISH as ossification of the spine across at least 3 disc spaces without disc degeneration, with relative preservation of disc height in the vertebral segments involved. 2 The etiology of DISH remains unknown, but several studies demonstrated associations with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and advanced age. 3–5 In Japan, which is experiencing a superaging society

Full access

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis masquerading as asthma: case report

Karim Mithani, Ying Meng, David Pinilla, Nova Thani, Kayee Tung, Richard Leung, and Howard J. Ginsberg

D iffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a systemic, noninflammatory condition characterized by calcification and ossification of ligaments and entheses, involving mainly the cervical and thoracic spine. Although the etiology of DISH remains unknown, notable risk factors include older age, higher body mass index (BMI), a history of diabetes mellitus, and higher levels of serum uric acid. 2 , 8 The majority of patients are asymptomatic, although some may present with pain, stiffness, reduced range of motion (ROM), dysphonia, or dysphagia. The most

Restricted access

Assessment of brain tumor cell motility in vivo and in vitro

Michael R. Chicoine and Daniel L. Silbergeld

-lapse videomicroscopy system. The inverted microscope holds a petri dish with cells under study in an atmosphere-controlled environment. The microscope is equipped with a 35-mm camera (CAM 1) for still photos and a videocamera (CAM 2) for time-lapse videomicroscopy. The monitor enabled observation and analysis of the images, which were captured on video prints by the video printer, recorded on videotape with the time-lapse VCR, and further edited with the SVHS VCR. Image analysis was performed with an online computer via digital capture equipment. Time-lapse image acquisition

Restricted access

Spinal cord injury after traumatic spine fracture in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders

Frederik R. Teunissen, Bianca M. Verbeek, Thomas D. Cha, and Joseph H. Schwab

A nkylosing spondylitis (AS) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) are diseases both leading to ankylosis of the spine, resulting in a rigid, fracture-prone spine. Because of their similarities the two are often grouped together in the literature. 5 , 19 , 23 However, AS and DISH are different diseases and have a different morphology of ankylosis. 7 , 12 , 16 AS is a rheumatic inflammatory disease, affecting predominantly (90.3%) human leukocyte antigen–B27 positive patients, 64% of whom are men. 9 About 80% of the patients experience onset of

Open access

Large aortic pseudoaneurysm after fusion surgery for hyperextension-type lumbar fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: illustrative case

Hirokazu Shoji, Kimihiko Sawakami, Yuki Tanaka, Seiichi Ishikawa, Hiroyuki Segawa, and Takashi Wakabayashi

Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders (ASD), such as ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), are often mechanically unstable. The fractures are usually of the severe types, such as AO spine injury type B or C, even if the cause of injury is a low-energy trauma, such as a fall. 1 These fractures may cause immediate- or late-onset spinal cord injury and neurological deficits after the trauma. Hence, operative management is usually recommended for all patients, except in rare cases of stable fractures

Free access

Prognostic factors of balloon kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral fractures with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Yuji Tsuchikawa, Naosuke Kamei, Kiyotaka Yamada, Toshio Nakamae, Nobuo Adachi, and Yoshinori Fujimoto

T he incidence of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVFs) in the elderly is increasing as society ages, impairing the daily activities of the elderly and increasing the economic burden on society. 1 – 3 Conservative treatment of ordinary OVFs was reported to result in good outcomes; 4 however, fractures in the fused part of ankylosing spines with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) tend to create three columns, which usually have poor clinical outcomes and are indications for surgery. 5 Additionally, conservative treatment of vertebral