Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,562 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Herbert B. Locksley, A. L. Sahs and Lloyd Knowler

F rom early 1958, until the registering of new cases ended in May 1965, 6368 case reports entered the Central Registry of the Cooperative Study of Intracranial Aneurysms and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from 20 participating university centers ( Table 1 ). These cases had in common either a history of spontaneous non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), or the finding of an intracranial aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation (AVM). TABLE 1 Code Designations of Participating Centers in the Cooperative Study Code Number University and

Restricted access

Herbert B. Locksley, A. L. Sahs and Ronald Sandler

incidence of various causes of SAH are difficult to acquire. In the reports available, marked variations are encountered and appear to reflect differences in methods of study and in selection of cases. In this paper, the various diagnostic categories of SAH will be reviewed based on the experience of the Cooperative Study in 5836 cases. Special attention will be given to the groups of cases in which SAH is unrelated to aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations. (AVM). Brief Review of the Literature Symonds '24 delineated the four major routes by which blood

Restricted access

Herbert B. Locksley

representative sample population must come under close medical scrutiny and at the same time not have its natural course modified by treatment! Before the age of angiography, studies of the natural history of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and its various causes were necessarily founded on autopsy findings, and little could be done to establish the cause in those who lived. Angiography made possible the diagnosis of most aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the living; surgical treatment soon became the order of the day, and the opportunity to obtain an

Restricted access

Herbert B. Locksley

Single aneurysm with SAH* 2360 Single aneurysm with first SAH* 2106 Unruptured single aneurysm* 274 Total multiple aneurysm cases 626 Multiple aneurysms with SAH 587 Multiple aneurysms with first SAH 521 Unruptured multiple aneurysms 39 All groups except those marked by * contain cases of coincident aneurysm (A) and arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Of the 56 A plus AVM cases, 40 had SAH and 16 were unruptured. It is usually stated in the various analyses whether these cases are included or excluded

Restricted access

Arteriovenous Malformations

An Analysis of 545 Cases of Cranio-Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations and Fistulae Reported to the Cooperative Study

George Perret and Hiro Nishioka

549 verified congenital and/or acquired arteriovenous malformations * (AVM) was divided into the following groups: 453 intracranial angiomatous malformations † 421 supratentorial  32 infratentorial 37 coexistent intracranial aneurysm(s) and angiomatous malformation 39 carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae 20 miscellaneous vascular malformations 5 “aneurysms” of the vein of Galen 4 extracranial angiomatous malformations 7 combined intracranial-extracranial malformations 1 post

Restricted access

J. Lawrence Pool

Edited by Eben Alexander Jr.

A n arteriovenous malformation (AVM), sometimes called an arteriovenous aneurysm or angioma, represents persistence of an embryonic vascular pattern or shunt. With time the vessels of an AVM may become increasingly tortuous, dilated, and numerous, and the lesion more extensive. An AVM usually extends into the brain as a wedge, which means that the surgeon must be wary of its deep as well as superficial blood supply. An AVM may be the cause of seizures or progressive neurological or intellectual deficits as the result of one or more of the following related

Restricted access

Gonzalo Sanchez, Anthony Imparato and Joseph Ransohoff

S erial cerebral angiography has been used during extracranial carotid embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) to observe the behavior of the emboli 16, 18 and to evaluate the extent of obliteration of their arterial supply. When the flow to the malformation is greatly reduced, a “critical point” is reached, 18 with lessening of the sump effect, whereby there is no longer a preference for the emboli to enter the AVM. We consider serial cerebral angiography a useful method but not totally reliable for predicting the approaching danger point

Restricted access

Artificial Slow Flow Carotid Angiography

Carotid Angiography with Compression Proximal to the Site of Injection

Henk Verbiest and Thomas A. Dokkum

central perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery. This subtraction results in a disclosure of the draining vein of the AVM ( double arrow ) and better visualization of the supplying anterior choroidal artery. C . Same case. Routine profile angiograms. D . Same case. PC profile angiogram gives a clearer view of the extent ( arrows ) of the AVM due to reduced filling of branches of the middle cerebral artery. Double arrow points to draining vein. Discussion Principal Characteristics PC carotid angiography is inconsistent with one of the

Restricted access

Sherman C. Stein, Ayub K. Ommaya, John L. Doppman and Giovanni Di Chiro

T he introduction of selective arteriography 1 has permitted accurate identification of the feeding vessels in cases of spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This in turn has led to considerable improvement in the surgical management of these lesions. 3, 4 Spinal AVM are supplied by radicular branches originating from the vertebral arteries, the costocervical and thyrocervical trunks, and intercostal and lumbar arteries. In addition, Picard, et al., 5 have reported a patient whose spinal AVM was fed in part by a branch of the internal iliac artery, the

Restricted access

Masahiro Mizukami, Takashi Tomita, Toru Mine and Hiroshi Mihara

W e routinely perform four-vessel angiography on patients with cerebrovascular disorders. In 10 of 1107 cases, the vertebral artery was divided into two channels, thus forming a bypass. We could find no other reports of this bypass anomaly. The total series included 74 cerebral aneurysms in 64 patients, and eight arteriovenous malformations (AVM), which represent the usual percentage reported by others. 14 However, in the 10 cases with the bypass anomaly, there was a much higher percentage of aneurysms (six cases) and AVM (two cases). Case Report A 56